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U.S. Begins Digital Fingerprinting In Airports

timothy posted more than 10 years ago | from the fingers-bitte dept.

United States 1174

lemist writes "Cross Match has rolled out digital fingerprinting at major airports in the United States according to MSNBC. It's designed to increase border security. They appear to be using Cross Match's Verifier 300 LC. Note that the actual capture of the fingerprint requires no interaction with the device. It determines when the image quality is excellent and grabs it."

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GNAA confirms: U.S. is dying (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7898750)

GNAA / Google confirms: Linux is dying.
By GNAA Staff

Here you have it: it's official; Google confirms: Desktop Linux is dying.

Now, you might be thinking this is just another cut & paste troll based on the typical *BSD is dying bullshit.
It isn't.
As you might have know, your favorite search engine, Google [google.com] , has been running a little statistics service, called "Zeitgeist [google.com] ".
Since about a year ago, they started providing statistics of the operating systems used to access their search engine worldwide.
I will let the numbers speak for themselves:

Operating Systems Accessing Google in January 2002 [google.com]
Operating Systems Accessing Google in March 2002 [google.com]
Operating Systems Accessing Google in April 2002 [google.com]
Operating Systems Accessing Google in May 2002 [google.com]
Operating Systems Accessing Google in June 2002 [google.com]
Operating Systems Accessing Google in July 2002 [google.com]
Operating Systems Accessing Google in August 2002 [google.com]
Operating Systems Accessing Google in September 2002 [google.com]
Operating Systems Accessing Google in November 2002 [google.com]
Operating Systems Accessing Google in December 2002 [google.com]
Operating Systems Accessing Google in January 2003 [google.com]
Operating Systems Accessing Google in February 2003 [google.com]
Operating Systems Accessing Google in April 2003 [google.com]
Operating Systems Accessing Google in May 2003 [google.com]
Operating Systems Accessing Google in June 2003 [google.com]
Operating Systems Accessing Google in July 2003 [google.com]
Operating Systems Accessing Google in August 2003 [google.com]
Operating Systems Accessing Google in September 2003 [google.com]
Operating Systems Accessing Google in November 2003 [google.com]

If you've looked at even a few of these links, you don't need to be a Kreskin [amdest.com] to predict Desktop Linux's future. The hand writing is on the wall: Desktop Linux faces a bleak future. In fact there won't be any future at all for Linux on Desktop because Linux is dying. Things are looking very bad for Linux on Desktop. As many of us are already aware, Linux on Desktop continues to lose market share. Red ink flows like a river of blood.

According to Google Zeitgeist [google.com] , there are about 80% of Internet Explorer 6 [microsoft.com] users. The only platform supporting Internet Explorer 6 is, of course, Microsoft Windows. These statistics are consistent with the earlier presented graphs of the operating systems used to access Google, with the Windows family consistently taking the top 3 ranks. Out of remaining 20%, the split is even between MSIE 5.5, MSIE 5.0, both Windows-only browsers. Netscape 5.x (including Mozilla) counts for only a measly 5% of browsers used to access Google. As you can see from the graph, this sample was calculated starting from March 2001 until September 2003.

Linux "leaders" will have you believe that Linux is gaining market share. However, according to Google [google.com] , "Linux" was never a top 10 search word at *any time* since Google began tracking search statistics. This can only mean one thing: Linux is dying.

All major surveys show that Linux on Desktop is something never meant to happen. Repeatedly, reputable organizations review Desktop Linux offerings, and consistently [osnews.com] give [com.com] it [com.com] unacceptable [yahoo.com] scores, compared to even Apple [apple.com] 's MacOS X [apple.com] , which is actually based on the "claimed to by dying long time ago" *BSD. If you paid attention to the operating systems used to access Google graphs earlier, you will notice that MacOS has consistently scored higher percentages than Linux. Infact, the obscure "other" category, which we assume is embedded systems, PDA's, cellular phones, etc, has at times ranked Higher [google.com] than even Mac OS - and of course, Linux.

In almost 2 years worth of statistics, Linux [linux.com] has NEVER outranked even such a truly "dying" OS as Mac OS, and infact, never raised above the 1% mark. When Windows XP [microsoft.com] was released, Google searches for Linux drastically decreased [google.com] . This clearly demonstrates that Linux on Desktop is, for all practical purposes, dead.

Fact: Desktop Linux is dead.

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fp!!! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7898752)

or not...

What a terrible thing (-1, Troll)

panxerox (575545) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898758)

what? we shouldent even try to do anything to protect ourselves? yes it's invasive, yes it tacks on an additional 15 seconds, no we don't care if you don't like it. Who do we expect to protect our boarders for us? Canada? .. oh wait..

Re:What a terrible thing (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7898798)

Not only did you spell "borders" wrong, you used the tired "oh wait" tagline. Bravo! I salute you, purveyor of mediocrity.

Re:What a terrible thing (0, Redundant)

Pieroxy (222434) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898832)

Why not just preventing everyone from entering your borders? That way you are sure no one will bother you anymore.

Re:What a terrible thing (1)

randyest (589159) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898865)

Some Americans would be pretty happy with that. To be quite honest, I'd imagine the bulk of the complaints about closing America's borders completely would come from potential immigrants, not Americans.

What was your point again?

Re:What a terrible thing (1)

djupedal (584558) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898921)

Why not just preventing everyone from entering your borders?

Seems the current state of the Great Wall shows that to be easier said than done.

I can't wait for digital fingerprinting to be a tourist attraction, listed in guide books and photographed by tourists.

Re:What a terrible thing (1)

gustgr (695173) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898836)

I do not completelly agree with that. My country (Brazil) started January 1st do to that in our airports to, with a bit difference: it is required fingerprints and photographs only for north americans.

This law is based on the international reciprocity principle. Here it is used just as 'reveange' against the americans who were kind of humiliating the brazilian people on their airports.

I belive that when used for REAL security this is important, but just as a power and control game as it is being used will not solve anything.

Re:What a terrible thing (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7898885)

I think the United States also placed a special clause for Brazilians too... Something about transvestites. I'll have to find the link for you though

Re:What a terrible thing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7898960)

only for north americans

What did Mexicans and Canadians do to you?

Re:What a terrible thing (5, Insightful)

Goldberg's Pants (139800) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898881)

If all this nonsense actually DID increase security, then fair play. But it doesn't. From your statement you appear to believe that yet another privacy rape at the airport, in a climate where women have been forced to empty baby bottles because they might contain weapons, is worth it, do you? Would that be correct? It's all in the interests of national security...

Okay, then, over Christmas, the Bush regime (Heil Dubya!) raised the terror alert etc... saying an attack was likely.

Now let's see here, they claim this, which, to me, means ALL these new security measures have been a waste of time, effort and money, and done nothing other than strip American's of more and more of their rights. If there's a "clear and present danger" of an attack, the administration is admitting that all this nonsense at airports is rubbish because it has not stopped the potential for attacks.

In short: All this security at the airport is like the old adage.

"This rock in my hand keeps away all the lions."
"But there are no lions here."
"Exactly."

Let's look at it this way and assume the "threat" is real. The fingerprint system is ONLY as good as the intelligence it's received. If Joe Terrorist goes through and has never been fingerprinted before... Well woop de doo, when he flies a plane into a building, at least we'll know what his fingers looked like before they burnt up in the wreckage.

It's a useless security measure.

Blame Canada! (2, Interesting)

ergo98 (9391) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898959)

Who do we expect to protect our boarders for us? Canada?

Uh, no you shouldn't expect Canada to protect your borders for you, and the moral implication repeated constantly (such as your pathetic little sheep-like "oh wait") that we should is absolutely ludicrous. As a Canadian, I personally have no problem with the US crawling down into the basement, curling up into the fetal position and sucking its thumb -- It is your country, and as a visitor people simply have to accept each country's sovereign right to self-protection. Of course this measure would have done absolutely nothing to prevent 9/11, nor does it do anything to affect the hundreds of sleeper cells in the US, nor does it do anything but provide the illusion of safety for the ignorant (such as yourself). Of course this is from the same administration that is so bloody uninventive and unoriginal that they can only imagine that terrorist could only possibly conceive of hijacking airliners and smashing them into buildings -- until the terrorists put toxins in the water supply, at which point they'll then imagine that the world's terrorists are perpetually focused on putting toxins in water supplies...rinse and repeat.

Having said that, it is fascinating, though -- The United States currently hosts some 8 to 11 MILLION illegal aliens. The United States has rampant illegal weapons and drug trade. The United States Southern border has a guesstimated 6,000, uncaught, illegals crossing it every single day. Yeah, keep up the Canada jokes...You and Hillary Clinton can keep up the charade that we're the source of your security ills.

first (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7898761)

first post

Took the gov't long enough (-1, Troll)

ObviousGuy (578567) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898767)

And they'll know we are Muslims by our lopped off fingertips.

Interesting (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7898769)

Wil Wheaton [wilwheaton.org] made a blog entry a few hours ago about digital fingerprinting and piracy concerns. Definitely worth a read.

Re:Interesting (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7898783)

ROFL, got me good with that one.

Re:Interesting (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7898795)

tard got me too with it...

what a reject..

GOATSE.CX (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7898802)

doh

Re:Interesting (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7898809)

Wil Wheaton's new website design is pretty nifty!

Re:Interesting (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7898818)

Yeah, that's just like Wil to make those comments. Personally, I don't agree with him about how it's an invasion of privacy.

We need to be protected!

Re:Interesting (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7898837)

and this is related to this discussion.....how??????

Re:Interesting (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7898848)

Because Wil feels that fingerprinting is an invasion of privacy. I kinda have to agree with him on that.

Re:Interesting (0)

modme2 (630194) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898843)

got me too lol.. how?

Re:Interesting (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7898883)

The real one is .NET not .ORG . Bleah ... Domain ID:D103662685-LROR Domain Name:WILWHEATON.ORG Created On:06-Jan-2004 17:16:28 UTC Last Updated On:06-Jan-2004 17:16:58 UTC Expiration Date:06-Jan-2005 17:16:28 UTC Sponsoring Registrar:R91-LROR Status:TRANSFER PROHIBITED Registrant ID:GODA-05001368 Registrant Name:Derek Arnold Registrant Street1:219 1/2 N Federal Ave Apt 8 Registrant City:Mason City Registrant State/Province:Iowa Registrant Postal Code:50401 Registrant Country:US Registrant Phone:+1.6414217320 Registrant Email:monoperative@yahoo.com Admin ID:GODA-25001368 Admin Name:Derek Arnold Admin Street1:219 1/2 N Federal Ave Apt 8 Admin City:Mason City Admin State/Province:Iowa Admin Postal Code:50401 Admin Country:US Admin Phone:+1.6414217320 Admin Email:monoperative@yahoo.com Tech ID:GODA-15001368 Tech Name:Derek Arnold Tech Street1:219 1/2 N Federal Ave Apt 8 Tech City:Mason City Tech State/Province:Iowa Tech Postal Code:50401 Tech Country:US Tech Phone:+1.6414217320 Tech Email:monoperative@yahoo.com Name Server:NS17.DR2.NET Name Server:NS18.DR2.NET

Re:Interesting (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7898907)

How about a little formatting:

Domain ID:D103662685-LROR
Domain Name:WILWHEATON.ORG
Created On:06-Jan-2004 17:16:28 UTC
Last Updated On:06-Jan-2004 17:16:58 UTC
Expiration Date:06-Jan-2005 17:16:28 UTC
Sponsoring Registrar:R91-LROR
Status:TRANSFER PROHIBITED
Registrant ID:GODA-05001368
Registrant Name:Derek Arnold
Registrant Street1:219 1/2 N Federal Ave Apt 8
Registrant City:Mason City
Registrant State/Province:Iowa
Registrant Postal Code:50401
Registrant Country:US
Registrant Phone:+1.6414217320
Registrant Email:monoperative@yahoo.com
Admin ID:GODA-25001368
Admin Name:Derek Arnold
Admin Street1:219 1/2 N Federal Ave Apt 8
Admin City:Mason City
Admin State/Province:Iowa
Admin Postal Code:50401
Admin Country:US
Admin Phone:+1.6414217320
Admin Email:monoperative@yahoo.com
Tech ID:GODA-15001368
Tech Name:Derek Arnold
Tech Street1:219 1/2 N Federal Ave Apt 8
Tech City:Mason City
Tech State/Province:Iowa
Tech Postal Code:50401
Tech Country:US
Tech Phone:+1.6414217320
Tech Email:monoperative@yahoo.com
Name Server:NS17.DR2.NET
Name Server:NS18.DR2.NET

Re:Interesting (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7898924)

oh nos!

you posted my info on there. I STILL WIN

Re:Interesting (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7898942)

> I STILL WIN

Indeed you do, sir!

Re:Interesting (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7898966)

I really just couldn't believe the domain was available.

Re:Interesting (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7898898)

I'd like to know who originally modded this "Interesting". To me, it just proves that mozilla should block mouseOver popups

Re:Interesting (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7898903)

Hats off to you my friend:) Very nicely played sir.

28 countries exempt (5, Insightful)

Brahmastra (685988) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898779)

28 countries are exempt from this testing including a lot of western european countries where the Sept 11th terrorists moved around with impunity. This fingerprinting scheme aint going to fix anything.

Re:28 countries exempt (1)

LinuxHam (52232) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898801)

This is the part that pisses me off the most.. typical govt pork..

Re:28 countries exempt (5, Interesting)

1029 (571223) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898815)

What I really like is Brazil's answer to this: they are now stopping and fingerprinting and photographing all US visitors. Tit-for-tat, the way it should be. And it wouldn't at all stop me from visting Brazil, just as it probably won't stop many Brazilians from coming here.

Re:28 countries exempt (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7898859)

Agreed
If have to respect Brasil's right to fingerprint if I am going to use America's right to do the same.

Re:28 countries exempt (-1, Offtopic)

Kohath (38547) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898886)

Brazil? I hear the monkey problem is even worse than before.

Re:28 countries exempt (4, Informative)

plj (673710) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898858)

But you should be a citizen of one of those 28 to get excluded, if I've understood correctly. AFAIK, the Sept 11th terrorists weren't, although they'd lived in Europe.

I'm not perfectly sure, however - please correct if I'm wrong.

Re:28 countries exempt (1)

crc32 (133399) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898934)

You are correct. What matters is the citizenship of the person, not their country of residence. Not that passports can't be faked, of course.

Re:28 countries exempt (4, Informative)

LX.onesizebigger (323649) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898958)

Does anyone recall the little fact that none of the September 11 hijackers traveled under a false identity?

Re:28 countries exempt (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7898975)

Does anyone recall the little fact that none of the September 11 hijackers traveled under a false identity?

Yeah, it's absolutely crazy to think that they might modify their strategy slightly the second time around...

Re:28 countries exempt (4, Insightful)

GuyMannDude (574364) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898941)

But you should be a citizen of one of those 28 to get excluded, if I've understood correctly. AFAIK, the Sept 11th terrorists weren't, although they'd lived in Europe.

You're missing the point. All the terrorists have to do is get a forged passport from one of those countries and they'll slip through. A security net with tons of holes doesn't do any good.

On a related topic, does anyone know what the Pfa (probability of false alarm) for fingerprint matches is? It would be interesting to take this number, multiply it by the number of people coming into the country every day (subtracing out those from the magic 28 countries) and figure out how many jet-lag weary travelers are going to be in for one hell of a rude shock when they get to America.

GMD

Re:28 countries exempt (0, Flamebait)

Goldberg's Pants (139800) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898932)

where the Sept 11th terrorists moved around with impunity

Yes. Bush and his senior administration have visited Europe often haven't they...

Re:28 countries exempt (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7898937)

This fingerprinting scheme aint going to fix anything.

Wrong. It will fix some things. But not all things. This, and other fixes, will fix all things. The perfect should not be the enemy of the good.

Re:28 countries exempt (4, Insightful)

jaxdahl (227487) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898955)

Actually, those countries already have compatible passports which contain most/all of the information that this system captures anyway, so it isn't that big of a deal.

Re:28 countries exempt (0)

efuseekay (138418) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898969)

Which, incidentally, includes UK, country where Mr Shoe Bomber Richard Reid came from.

Doh. I don't mind the fingerprinting (IANAA) : the US Gov (and its corporations) prolly knows more about me than my own country :). But I think if they want to do it, they should just go all the way and fingerprint everybody. Personally I doubt this is gonna make anything any safer.

Besides, I don't know how they are going to use the data. But I do know that some interesting new techniques better be there go mine all those data they are going to get.

Yeah (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7898781)

Welcome to gattaca !

Re:Yeah (0, Flamebait)

Cthefuture (665326) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898860)

This isn't for Americans though. Moron.

Re:Yeah (0)

XiChimos (652495) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898919)

Privacy is for all, not just Americans, unless you are for the shooting of Chinese if they voice democratic beliefs. Besides privacy, the system won't work since it is easy enough to travel through Canada or an "allowed" country, especially if you aren't Arab, sadly.

Re:Yeah (1)

iminplaya (723125) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898933)

"This isn't for Americans though..."
That starts in the next stage.

If you want my fingerprint to fly... (5, Funny)

mikeophile (647318) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898789)

Don't be mad when I offer the middle one.

I think it's good. (4, Insightful)

ActionPlant (721843) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898790)

I don't think this is a problem. I see how some people think this might be an invasion of privacy, and hey, if they put this thing in random public places, especially without letting us know, yes I'd be upset. But this is in AIRPORTS. You're required to check in before you ever get on the plane anyway. I think it's just another means of making sure that people who are on these planes really are who they say they are. That can't be a bad thing.

Damon,

Re:I think it's good. (1)

hendridm (302246) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898882)

Would you have a problem with your DNA being on government file? How is this any different? If you're not doing anything wrong, you have nothing to worry about, right?

Re:I think it's good. (1)

ActionPlant (721843) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898956)

I suppose I might, but when I was a kid my folks took me down to be fingerprinted. I always assumed it wasn't any different than the census. And now I'm honestly wondering...do they still require this? I figured if you were a citizen, your fingerprints were on file. That's why I don't personally have a problem with this.

Damon,

Re:I think it's good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7898893)

For foreigners OK. But if they started doing this to Americans then I sure as hell would stop flying.

In general it may not be a bad idea if it's not abused but it could have some rather scary implications if it was. Enough to warrent not using it. All of a sudden every person who ever flew would have an FBI profile. No thanks.

Re:I think it's good. (1)

JanneM (7445) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898899)

The basic thing I have against the idea is that I would have no control over where that fingerprint data ends up. It is taken in airports, but do you seriously think US authorities are not going to use the data in every way they can - especially considering that the policy at this time seems to be that non-US citizens are not entitled to the same protections that US citizens are (and that they have at home).

Re:I think it's good. (3, Insightful)

LX.onesizebigger (323649) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898936)

For a government to verify identity by means of passport examination is one thing. To keep personal, biometric data on file, however, is entirely different and something that most governments should not consider doing to their own citizens. Should other countries really accept that the U.S. government has more data on their citizens than those other countries themselves?

No invasion of privacy? Bull! If you really think so, please go down to your local precinct and volunteer to have your fingerprint taken so that you may be examined as a potential suspect in criminal investigations.

Making sure people who are on the planes are who they say they are -- bull! Against what database will this be verified? It's trying to please the public by making sure they can see the government keeps tabs on "those damn foreigners".

....And? (3, Insightful)

OtakuHawk (682073) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898792)

So they have my fingerprint... Are they taking names and other info, or are they just going to have a database full of 5 billion fingerprint entries, but no names?

Re:....And? (2, Interesting)

Nutt (106868) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898825)

I dont know about anyone else, but when I was young we all went on a "field trip" to the local jail and courthouse and had our fingerprints taken. Of course we all thought it was fun seeing where all the mean old people were kept but looking back I wouldn't be suprised if my prints wound up in a database somewhere..

Re:....And? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7898943)

So, they have your photo, fingerprint, and passport number and flight details. More than enough to start crossmatching data.


Jerk

Re:....And? (0)

hkfczrqj (671146) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898949)

Yes. They are doing this in the inmigration area of the airports (passport control, that is... so they have the names also). And they are also taking a digital picture of the person.

What next ? (4, Funny)

noelo (661375) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898793)

Anal probes ?????

Re:What next ? (1)

Unominous Coward (651680) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898851)

hey, I would'be be giving them ideas.

Re:What next ? (3, Funny)

core plexus (599119) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898948)

Anal probes ?

For some people, that would be an incentive to travel more.

-cp-

President Bush to Liberate Alaska! [alaska-freegold.com]

Lineup (5, Funny)

mhlandrydotnet (677863) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898803)

Now, all we need to do is to have terrorists send us in a copy of their finger prints so we can keep em on file.

who give a shit (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7898811)

about a bunch of fucking niggers being treated like animals

It wasn't me! (1)

AndroidCat (229562) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898813)

It was my evil clone !

(Too bad clones don't have identical fingerprints, and Raelian cloning methods still seem to be a bit .. umm .. fake? Besides, as the original, I'd be far more evil than any cheap knock-off!)

Clever device (0, Offtopic)

wkitchen (581276) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898814)

It would be nice if a good fingerprint reader could be made cheap enough to use it for things like unlocking doors and starting cars. Wouldn't need to carry so many keys around. Should be simpler for these kinds of applications since it would only have to match against a very small local database of prints.

so robbers will chop off your finger (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7898852)

Nice move, eh?

"Money or your live!" they say.
"All my money is locked in the bank with my PIN and fingerprint!"
"TELL ME YOUR PIN OR I'LL SHOOT YOUR DAUGHTER!"
"1234!"
"Good. NOW YOUR FINGER PLEASE!"
*chopchopchop* -

There ya go...

Re:Clever device (5, Insightful)

JanneM (7445) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898939)

Problem is, faking a fingerprint - even when checking for pulse and body heat - is not all that difficult. Bad Guys(tm) will do so if needed. And they will of course preferentially use someone else's print (which again is quite doable to obtain). Then what do you do? Passwords, PIN codes and social security numbers can be changed if you've lost them or is a victim of identity theft. But how do you change your fingerprint?

Finger print scanners (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7898817)

Are an incredibly easy way for the government to assassinate people. The skin there is exceptionally thin and perfect for micro-injection of virii or other agents. Plus they can be sure they got the right person. Goodbye privacy, hello death. It's the American way.

READ ORWELL (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7898821)

As seen on numerous billboards across the country, I had to bring this slogan here to slashdot.

Please read Orwell and maybe a history book about Germany in 1933-1945 and please don't block similarities off your mind by thinking "Nah! That can't happen here, we're a democracy!" - This democracy is rapidly declining and too many bury their head in the sand...

Re:READ ORWELL (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7898965)

It is importnat to remember that Orwell's book was in response to his deep dislike of the Communists.
It isn't directly anti-Fascist (Orwell didn't like them either), but instead created after Orwell hung out with, learned how Communists acted, and got to really hate them.

Meanwhile... (1)

EduardoFonseca (703176) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898824)

... here in Brazil we still use the only fool-proof method: Ink and paper!

And BTW... I agree with the "reciprocy" we are giving to the americans ;)

Re:Meanwhile... (1)

EduardoFonseca (703176) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898847)

err... the correct term would be "reciprocity".

Re:Meanwhile... (1)

noelo (661375) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898875)

Imagine the 'reciprocy' in places like Indonesia or Iran.....

Re:Meanwhile... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7898890)

6 letters: KABOOM

Re:Meanwhile... (2, Interesting)

JCCyC (179760) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898891)

More: Brazilian authorities quickly altered the procedure from "get all 10 fingers" to "get thumb only" because in the USA they're taking thumb only. Now THAT is tit-for-tatness!

Re:Meanwhile... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7898915)

We have to be fair :)

Re:Meanwhile... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7898892)

You can make errors with ink and paper. And you can't search nearly as quickly when you have prints to identify.

Fingerprinting with ink and paper is just looking for matching points, and multiple people can have enough similar matching points to make a mistake.

Re:Meanwhile... (1)

QuasiCoLtd (727325) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898916)

And BTW... I agree with the "reciprocy" we are giving to the americans ;)

As an American I do find that somewhat humorus myself, however, isn't that costing Brazil a decent bit in manpower and money just to be able to do this? Seems like a waste just to spite someone.

Re:Meanwhile... (1)

EduardoFonseca (703176) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898952)

Well, lots of Brazilians (me included) felt offended by this measure. C'mon, this is the same as calling Brazilians terrorists.

Plenty of Brazilians (it's all over the news here) have been quite humilliated on U.S. airports (even our former Foreign Minister!). We all felt your pain and prayed for the victims, but this is too much.

A lot of manpower? Yes. A waste? Of course. Do I agree with it? Sure.

Easy to bypass. (3, Insightful)

DAldredge (2353) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898834)

All they have to do is walk across the damn borders (north or south).

Re:Easy to bypass. (1)

checkitout (546879) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898880)

All they have to do is walk across the damn borders (north or south).

Nope, apparently they're going to start doing this at the borders as well.

Re:Easy to bypass. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7898918)

We should have closed those borders down long ago.
We can call the northern one "The Wall That Chretien Built"

Are "Suspected Terrorist" buttons OK yet? (1)

i.r.id10t (595143) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898850)

Or is everyone just assuming it, and not needing the labels? http://www.politechbot.com/p-04973.html

I've not one problem with improving security, as long as the improvements really are and work.

next up... Verichip (4, Insightful)

segment (695309) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898854)


Wired magazine
02:00 AM Oct. 23, 2002 PDT

A surprise decision by the Food and Drug Administration permits the use of implantable ID chips in humans, despite an FDA investigator's recent public reservations about the devices.

The FDA sent chip manufacturer Applied Digital Solutions a letter stating that the agency would not regulate the VeriChip if it was used for "security, financial and personal identification or safety applications," ADS said Tuesday.

But the FDA has not determined whether the controversial chip can be used for medical purposes, including linking to medical databases, the company added...

Supposedly, (supposedly) DoD was looking into this as a replacement for military dogtags, and the BOP (Bureau of Prisons) was supposedly looking into it. Now sounds far fetched but according to the companies press releases: September 29, 2003 - Applied Digital Solutions, Inc. (Nasdaq: ADSX), an advanced technology development company, today announced that its wholly owned subsidiary, VeriChip Corporation, has retained the services of Stanley "Stan" L. Reid, a longtime technology industry executive and former congressional aide with extensive experience and wide contacts in Washington, D.C., to market VeriChip(TM) secure identification solutions to federal agencies.

...

Since 1996, Mr. Reid has served as president of Strategic Sciences, a Washington, D.C.-area consulting firm that specializes in marketing advanced technologies to the federal government. Mr. Reid has particular expertise in selling new, introductory technologies to government agencies, including the Departments of Defense (DoD), Energy (DoE) and State, as well as the agencies that have been incorporated into the Department of Homeland Security. (source [adsx.com] )

Just think if they decided to do away with Social Security, or made this a standard for newer borns a-la vaccinations... Oh well that's why I'm glad I support the war on terror [politrix.org]

Welcome to America (4, Funny)

psyconaut (228947) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898857)

Please excuse our xenophobic and jingoistic tendancies. Ya'll have a nice day now!

-psy

A quick parody... (4, Funny)

TDScott (260197) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898863)

The Department of Homeland Security put out a PDF leaflet [dhs.gov] about the program, which contained their normal, almost incomprehensible pictograms like those on ready.gov [ready.gov]

I thought they needed some better, and funnier, subtitles [thomasscott.net] .

Mixed feelings (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7898866)

On one hand, this shouldn't affect anyone's privacy at all, because all travel information to foreing countries (or even domestic travel for that matter) is already a matter of record. As long as you are who you say you are, I don't see how this affects anyone not trying to travel under an alias.

On the other hand, particularly since 28 countries are exempt, I don't see how this will be very effective at stopping undesirables from getting into the country.

The libertarian in me founds this whole thing distasteful though, but in an imperfect world this is a rather small infringement on my rights and I suppose on the balance it is worth the inconvenience.

Orwellian... (4, Insightful)

highwaytohell (621667) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898876)

Well the US Govt has a stance of trust nobody, my question is whats going to stop a guy with three suitcases full of plastic explosives walking into an Airport and making a crater out of it. Fingerprints arent gonna help much then. All these security measures are just put in place to make the people feel safe, however a plane could come from a foreign country which doesnt have or cant afford to implement this technology. Osama is still to be caught, intelligence has done nothing, and you dont hear of any new breaks in locating him. All we see is his head on Al Jazeera threatening to eradicate the infidels. When Sept 11 occured, no one knew who these guys were, they could have been on the plane just as easily with the fingerprint technology implemented then. The real threat is knowing who your enemy is. All we have is one face, we dont have his many followers. This could just lead to a witch hunt of massive proportions

Just saw this one the news... (1, Interesting)

zeno_2 (518291) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898877)

Brazil I guess is making every American do a fingerprint test to get into the country as a response to what the story is about. I found it pretty funny..

OMG (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7898896)

Oh my God. This was on CNN 4 days ago & just now showed up on slashdot? What is this? A slow news day?

what are they going to do.... (1)

noelo (661375) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898908)

With that kid in Iraq whose arms got blown off during the war....toe prints ????

Brazil strikes back! (sort of) (5, Insightful)

AndroidCat (229562) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898909)

Brazil treads on US fingers [telegraphindia.com] (I out-sourced it to an Indian site. :^)
Washington has been upset by Brazil's tit-for-tat reaction to the US-VISIT system that went into force yesterday with digital technology after a year of preparation. US travellers have complained of up to nine-hour delays at Rio de Janeiro airport where Brazilian immigration authorities, only told of the order last week, are using inkpads and paper.
Well gee, travellers upset by security measures, imagine that! (Inkpads and paper sound like non-security.) Looks like the Brazilian governement as a whole is undecided about this, "not foreign policy".

Yep. (4, Informative)

nadavspi (631105) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898920)

We got ours taken at the American Embassy in Israel when we were there a few weeks ago (were there to get a new visa stamp).
Anyone 14 or over is required to have their prints taken, and chcked every time they enter the US.
The article is right; it really didn't take that much longer than usual. As long as it doesn't slow the already crappy process to go through at 5 AM after a 12 hour flight, it doesn't really bother me.

Reminds me of the early days of Dehomag (5, Informative)

luckytroll (68214) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898929)

Dehomag (the German branch of Hollerith - the ancestor of IBM) got its start assisting the Germans with a similar effort - using computing technology (punched cards) to track all kinds of things in the interest of security, efficiency, and thoroughness. They got their start automating the census, and wound up empowering governments with then unheard of levels of efficiency in attaining many of their goals, despite the changing nature of those goals.

Again we are seeing a watershed moment in the efficiency, security and thoroughness of states ability to enforce their policies. Lets hope that this time the population will gain a proportional increase in control over the agenda of the state.

The alternative will be no less than a repetition of history.

The Revelation (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7898950)


16 And he causeth all, both small and great, rich and poor, free and bond, to receive a mark in their right hand, or in their foreheads:
17 and that no man might buy or sell, save he that had the mark, or the name of the beast, or the number of his name.
18 Here is wisdom. Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast: for it is the number of a man; and his number is Six hundred threescore and six.

Does this really solve a problem? (2, Insightful)

wrmrxxx (696969) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898961)

Were the September 11 hijackers travelling under false passports? I was under the impression that they were not. If this system had already been in place in 2001, would the outcome have been any different?

Is accurate knowledge about who is entering the USA through airports really a significant problem for those trying to predict and prevent future terrorism incidents? I would have expected that a greater problem was knowing the intentions and tracking the actual actions of individuals.

If this system works perfectly, surely people with terrorist intentions will know it, and simply not enter the USA legally? It's not as if the USA's borders are impregnable - there are large numbers of people managing to enter without passports or visas. It's like carefully putting a lid on the bucket to make sure you don't spill any water, but ignoring the leak-hole at the bottom of the bucket.

This is the first step... (2, Interesting)

FlyGirl (11285) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898964)

... and once we all get used to this, I wonder how long it will be before they want to fingerprint ALL airline passangers. Many might say I am paranoid, but I have always been worried about "having control" of my fingerprints -- yeah, yeah, I realize I leave them behind everywhere, but there's something scary to me about the government having them. Just too bad that they don't have some kind of device that I could be reasonably sure would check my fingerprints against the known criminals and then DISCARD them -- I'd feel much better if I knew that they weren't keeping a permenant record of them for possible future use who-knows-when and who-knows-how. And, please, don't give me the age old line of "If you've done nothing wrong, what are you afraid of?" Some of us just like privacy (and respect it in others) for the sake of it.

Does anyone actually think that this will work?? (1)

teamhasnoi (554944) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898967)

I was listening to NPR yesterday, and there was an interview with the Secretary of Pork Projects That Do Little Other Than Assure Folks Who Don't Do Any Research On Anything That Is Shoveled Down Their Throats, and he said that this was not 'foolproof', but would make great strides in protecting us from terrorism.

I say bullshit.

Anyone who is ready to give their life in order to kill as many Americans as they can will have a backup plan. There are many ways into the country. And who checks the accuracy of the info the first time through?

Besides, this is an excellent example of treating the symptoms and not the cause.

I really think if we had a foreign policy that didn't run the equivalent of a rape-and-pillage mission every 6 months, we could forgo the whole war on terrorism.

Of course, it would be hard to powergrab and make billions of $$$ if that was the case.

Good ol' Tom Ridge was interviewed on the Tonight Show a while back. He said that the WOT would never end. I think he meant the War on Peace.

I am far more terrrified of our 'elected' officials than any AK toting zealot.

What's next? (1)

mikeophile (647318) | more than 10 years ago | (#7898973)

Will we have to start making Xerox copies of our asses to ride the subway?
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