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Top Banned Books of 2003

CowboyNeal posted more than 10 years ago | from the only-fit-for-printing dept.

Censorship 1033

michaelzhao writes "The ALA (American Library Association) recently published the new 100 most frequently banned books list of 2003. Of the banned books, Harry Potter was in the number 7th place in the most frequently banned. Also included were 'Where's Waldo' and 'The Giver' along with 'Goosebumps' and 'How to Eat Fried Worms.' These books were banned from various public institutions. This means that they were banned from various public libraries and public schools around the nation. (private schools, libraries, and institutions of higher learning don't count) The ALA encourages the people of the United States to fight against the book bans and read a banned book today!"

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first one? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10096578)

one first!

So What? (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10096579)

Well, I don't know about banning them, but quite a few of the books on that list certainly qualify as total crap.

* Scary Stories
Um. WHY?! These books were some of the most popular books in school when I was in grade school. You were lucky if you could get a copy because they were ALWAYS checked out.

* I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings?
Maya Angelou is a crappy poet and a crappy writer. If she weren't over 200 years old and black, nobody would think twice about her. And who cares that she was a stripper or prostitute or whatever when she was younger. That doesn't make her poetry stink less. It's about time we stop torturing children by making them read her garbage. There are much better poets out there to read and study.

* Daddy's Roommate / Heather Has Two Mommies
Well, need I say anything? These obviously don't belong in a school library. Six year old kids don't need to be learning about homosexuality anymore than they need to be learning about heterosexuality. Leave this stuff for the later years - like when they can at least tie their own shoes.

* Bridge To Terabithia
Oh good god what a piece of shit. I had to read this in school in fifth grade. It was short, sappy, dull and retarded. It might be fitting for third grade, if it wasn't so boring - but not for anything above that.

* Sex
Well, duh.

* A Wrinkle In Time
What the fuck?! This was a great book for young people (around the age of 10 to 12). What in the fuck would it be banned for?!?!

* The New Joy of Gay Sex
Golly, why do you figure they might not want their children reading that? I would say that's not a book that was so much banned as it just wasn't purchased. I'm sure most places for children don't carry books on how to fist your girlfriend's pussy either. So what.

* How To Eat Fried Worms
What the hell?! Granted, it's a stupid book - but I dont' recall anything offensive or whatever in it.

* Where's Waldo?
Well, I understand this one. It's not even a book really. Banning this is like banning television from the school library. It's just not really an appropriate item.

Really, most of the books on that list suck. Some are great, but not many (Slaughter House for example). And many of them SHOULD be banned. I'd be pretty ticked if my kid brought home some of the books from that list from school. Others, though, make no sense at all. Really odd.

Re:So What? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10096642)

I have to disagree as to your opinion on Angelou. I happen to enjoy her poetry. It seems to me like you're a bigot/Republican. (No, I'm not black)

Re:So What? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10096704)

What the fuck? I'm a bigot/republican because I can't stand her poetry? That is the stupidest thing I have ever heard.

Her poetry is ridiculous. I could toss a bunch of random shit into my computer and come out with better poems and prose than her. And her pattern of speach is irritating.

You have a serious mental problem if your first thought to someone saying they dont' like someone's writing is "well, they must be a bigot".

Re:So What? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10096748)

Just because he doesn't like Angelou doesn't made him racist. Personally, I very much enjoy her work, too.

On the other hand, I don't enjoy the work of EE Cummings. Some of his work confronts the issue of race. It's not because I disagree with him, I just don't enjoy his style.

My point is, just because he doesn't like Angelou's work doesn't mean he's a racist. Am I a racist because I don't like Cummings' style?

Re:So What? (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10096643)

What I can't figure out is why To Kill A Mockingbird was banned. It's an excellent book and an excellent movie as well. I find it absurd and offensive that it's being banned.

The book I found most difficult to read in high school was Night. It's a vert graphic description of the holocaust. I gave up on reading it because it was so disturbing to me, and just took a bad grade. I can't believe that hasn't made the list.

Re:So What? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10096722)

I don't think highschool kids really read anythign like that anymore anyway. I know that when I was in school a decade ago, we didn't read things like Antigony or Slaughterhouse Five. No, our english class read "Jurassic Park". Fucking stupid. And then we wonder why our country is so far behind.

Re:So What? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10096766)

Not that I agree with banning it, but I can appreciate some academics having trouble with the material (Atticus Finch is seen as a "nigger lover" - a quote straight from the book, btw).

Re:So What? (3, Interesting)

FrivolousPig (602133) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096671)

"* Where's Waldo?
Well, I understand this one. It's not even a book really. Banning this is like banning television from the school library. It's just not really an appropriate item."

Perhaps it teaches attention to detail?

That's a tad harsh. (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10096705)

If you wouldn't like your kids reading those books, fine; the library doesn't have to stock them. Schools choose what books they do and do not show, and it's well within their right to simply not accept copies of "Sex", but banning them altogether is certainly inappropriate. Ultimately, it's the reader's choice whether or not he/she wants to read a book, not the author's; no book should be completely banned.

Not shelved, fine. If there's a book in the school library that you'd rather not fall into your child's hands, petition to have it removed from the shelf, or made inaccessible to younger children. But banned completely, based on the objective opinions of a mother? No.

Re: So What? (1)

Black Parrot (19622) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096710)


> * Daddy's Roommate / Heather Has Two Mommies
Well, need I say anything? These obviously don't belong in a school library. Six year old kids don't need to be learning about homosexuality anymore than they need to be learning about heterosexuality. Leave this stuff for the later years - like when they can at least tie their own shoes


I'm sure that last phrase is a euphemism for something, but I can't quite figure it out.

Re:So What? (5, Insightful)

shalla (642644) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096712)

And many of them SHOULD be banned. I'd be pretty ticked if my kid brought home some of the books from that list from school.

And while I respect your right to decide what your child reads, you do NOT have the right to decide what MY child reads or what OTHER PEOPLE's children read. Just because you find Bridge to Terabithia to be crap doesn't mean all kids do, and I want my child to be able to check it out of a school library.

Keep in mind that this list does not just reflect school libraries, and that this is a list of challenges to books, not necessarily that all these books have been successfully removed from libraries.

I'd also disagree that Heather Has Two Mommies is inappropriate for elementary school kids. We have books picturing heterosexual couples, why not homosexual ones? It's not like the book advocates for only homosexual couples, or has sexual tones. Shockingly enough, there are also picture books about death out there. These kinds of books have a purpose. If your child brings it home, sit down and talk about it. If you don't want them reading it, tell them that. My parents vetted my reading.

If we're going to censor everything anyone finds offensive or inappropriate for their children, we're not going to have any materials in libraries.

Re:So What? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10096756)

Keep in mind that this list does not just reflect school libraries, and that this is a list of challenges to books, not necessarily that all these books have been successfully removed from libraries.

Yes it does, mostly. 71% of the challenges were with regard to school libraries.

I'd also disagree that Heather Has Two Mommies is inappropriate for elementary school kids. We have books picturing heterosexual couples, why not homosexual ones?

What children's picture books depict heterosexuality as the entire point of the book? Yes, books depict them if you mean that in the story there is a dad and a mom - but dad and mom and their relationship aren't the topic of those books now are they? I don't think it's appropriate for a little kid to have to read a book focusing on anyone's sexuality. PERIOD. Christ, at least wait until they're in double digits. My six year old doesn't need to know this kind of shit. I don't have a problem with anyone's sexuality, but I don't want my child's brain being pelted with everyone's vies - be they religious or sexual - when he's barely old enough to tie his shoe and still holds my hand to cross the street.

Re:So What? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10096729)

If she weren't over 200 years old...

She isn't. Try 76.

Re:So What? (1)

KillerHamster (645942) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096755)

* Bridge To Terabithia Oh good god what a piece of shit. I had to read this in school in fifth grade. It was short, sappy, dull and retarded

I couldn't have said it any better. This book sucks beyond description. In fact, that's probably what won it the Newberry Medal. Have you ever noticed that "award-winning" children's books almost ALWAYS suck? I'd gladly support a ban on Bridge To Terabithia just to spare kids from exposure to such stupid literature.

Re:So What? (1)

mOoZik (698544) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096771)

You forgot Ayn Rand's Atlas Shrugged! :P

2003? Recent? (5, Informative)

lecithin (745575) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096582)

The title actual is "The 100 Most Frequently Challenged Books of 1990-20001".

Re:2003? Recent? (2, Informative)

lecithin (745575) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096603)

Thats what I get for eating and typing at the same time. It is actually "The 100 Most Frequently Challenged Books of 1990-2000".

Re:2003? Recent? (5, Funny)

Phoenixhunter (588958) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096605)

That's what happens when the submitter doesn't RTFA.

Waldo (1)

ScribeOfTheNile (694546) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096586)

May I ask why the hell Where's Waldo? was banned?

Re:Waldo (5, Informative)

DrunkenTerror (561616) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096607)

Nudity. [solonor.com]

Re:Waldo (4, Interesting)

M. Silver (141590) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096609)

Perhaps someone who's read the article (it's loading in another tab, but I'm not holding my breath) can say for sure, but my best guess would be that the ban list must include books that are not "banned" so much as "excluded by policy," perhaps in this case because "Every time we buy a Waldo book, some smart aleck has to go through and circle Waldo on each page, so we should stop wasting our money on them."

Or some such.

It's *still* loading, though.

Re:Waldo (5, Funny)

deanj (519759) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096610)

Well..this wasn't banned really... They just couldn't find it.

Re:Waldo (1, Insightful)

MrKevvy (85565) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096632)

"May I ask why the hell Where's Waldo? was banned?"

I would imagine as it's wordless/pictorial, so may be removed from school libraries as it has no educational value as it doesn't help students with their reading comprehension. Time spent finding Waldo is time not spent learning anything.

Re:Waldo (1)

KillerHamster (645942) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096659)

And, as I recall, some of the pictures have what could be considered nudity.

Re:Waldo (1)

joshmoh (708871) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096647)

According to the banned books project (http://solonor.com/bannedbooks/archives/001808.ht ml [solonor.com] ):

Nudity.

Guess someone found something more than just Waldo.

Re:Waldo (1)

Jeff DeMaagd (2015) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096731)

If it is true, I think it is "bare back" nudity. A topless female sunbather which you don't see the other side. That is, if I'm not making it up as a figment of my memory.

What I'd like to see is some sort of evidence of it. One timy person on a beach of thousands, in a book of dozens of images is really quite a stretch anyway.

-1, Redundant (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10096587)

This article was redundancy city.

Why Harry? (4, Interesting)

BigHungryJoe (737554) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096588)

Is the objection to Harry Potter that it depicts magic? I don't get it. C.S. Lewis had magic in his books, and Christians love him. What is the difference?

Re:Why Harry? (4, Insightful)

Mr. Arbusto (300950) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096621)

I don't get The Giver being banned either. It was REQUIRED reading when I was in middle school, and then again in High School.

Why would it be banned? Depicts socialism and controled death?

Re:Why Harry? (2, Informative)

dazilla (647166) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096626)

Harry Potter actually refers to it as witchcraft. This causes a problem with some Christian organizations, as it's clearly against their teaching. CS Lewis, on the other hand, was simply using it as a plot device. Also, the author of Harry Potter is a proponent of wicca. I'm not saying anything for or against either, but those are the main reasons for banning them.

Re:Why Harry? (5, Informative)

Dj (224) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096742)

And would you like to give a reference to your factesque "is a proponent of Wicca"?

Or was it something you heard....

Maybe like http://www.snopes.com/humor/iftrue/potter.htm

That sort of stuff eh?

The simple fact that the Potter books are *counter* to some pretty fundamental Wicca principles is the other give away.

Still... what about them Swift Boat Vets eh? And are you interested in this bridge I have for sale?

Re:Why Harry? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10096753)

Harry Potter actually refers to it as witchcraft.

Unlike Narnia, which is ruled by the White "No, certainly not a witch, we can't expose our children to that sort of thing"?

Re:Why Harry? (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10096762)

Also, the author of Harry Potter is a proponent of wicca.

What do you base this charge on? The article in The Onion that was pulled because stupid people believed it was real!?

Re:Why Harry? (4, Insightful)

wired_parrot (768394) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096653)

The difference is in the number of copies published. J.K. Rowling has achieved a phenomenom that C.S. Lewis could not even dream of. With fame comes greater scrutiny. I'm sure there's hundreds of books depicting magic and paganism and ways more objectionable to religious fundamentalists, but none of them achieved the level of book sales that Harry Potter did.

Re:Why Harry? (1)

DAldredge (2353) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096654)

The 'religious' groups in theis country need 'evils' so people will give them money to fight said 'evils'

Partial list of evils.

Comics
Rock and Roll
Dungeons and Dragons
Harry Potter

Re:Why Harry? (1)

BigHungryJoe (737554) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096677)

They won the D&D battle. Remember the 1st edition Dungeon Masters Guide? With the big demon on the front? Or all the demons in Monster Manual? Nothing like that in 3rd edition. I suspect they didn't want heat from the Christians.

Re:Why Harry? (1)

betelgeuse-4 (745816) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096689)

DAldredge's partial list of 'evils'(from sig):

ruby
python

I wonder if people pay him to fight these 'evils'

Re:Why Harry? (3, Insightful)

6800 (643075) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096660)

I probably should not try to answer your question since I haven't read Potter and only have second hand knowledge. However I will give it a shot. In C.S.Lewis work, for example, "The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe", the lion is patterned after Jesus Christ and the story lines emphasise that which is generally accepted as good while the witch and witchery is depicted as both bad and weaker in the end. Thus the work is 'uplifting' Witchery, on the other hand, in Harry Potter is presented (so I understand) as attractive thus it is generally of no real worth and is possibly capeable of leading some off course, so to speak. At least there is (it would seem) little 'redeeming' value in Harry Potter.

Re:Why Harry? (1)

The Kiloman (640270) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096754)

It's because the magic in the Harry Potter is traditional witches-and-wizards magic. The Narnia series mythology is closely tied into Christianity. Seriously, have you read the later books in the series? It's pretty well beaten over your head by that point. Lewis was also influnced by astrology and Germanic mythology, but that stuff isn't near as offensive to your average middle-american Fundie as hexes and spells are.

For more info about the astrology tie-ins, check out this article [christianitytoday.com] . Yeah, it's on Christianity Today, ironically enough.

banning (4, Interesting)

BoldAC (735721) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096593)

I used to think my high school literature teacher was the coolest person in the world. (Oh, and she was HOT!) Obviously a previous bra-burning flower girl...

Then, the school board told her that she had to quit teaching A Brave New World -- and she did.

What a wimp. I lost all respect for her for not fighting it.

AC

Re:banning (1)

BakaHoushi (786009) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096638)

Personally, that's why I loved my English teacher and my Health teacher last year. We read books with some topics that... let's just say I doubt the school board would have approved of. (And my Health teacher said and did some things I doubt they'd approve of, either) So, my teacher often made a simple request: Don't tell the superintendent what we talk about in class, and we can pretty much get away with anything. No books are banned.

Re:banning (2, Interesting)

Ranger96 (452365) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096655)

So, when your employer tells you to not do something in terms of your job duties, are you a 'wimp' if you don't fight it? Or do you prefer to keep your job?

Re:banning (4, Insightful)

barcodez (580516) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096719)

Well yes, if your employer asks you to do something immoral or just plain wrong then you don't do it - seems simple enough to me - it's people blindly following orders that lets things like Hitler's Germany happen.

Re:banning (4, Insightful)

Ranger96 (452365) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096774)

Wow - only three levels in the thread and there's already a technical violation of Godwin's law!

I would agree with you about immoral activities. However, a school board telling a teacher not to teach certain material does not fall into that category. It may be unfortunate or anti-intellectual, but not immoral.

Re:banning (3, Insightful)

Apreche (239272) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096750)

No, and this is a major problem in this country. People are more afraid of consequences than for standing up for what they believe in. I'm more afraid of not standing up for what I believe in than the consequences.

Re:banning (3, Interesting)

NoMercy (105420) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096690)

Lot better than in the UK, the national criculum has seen to that, all schools no matter where they are or who there teaching, teach the same stuff, so we all read Of Mice and Men, and we all do Macbeth in drama, we all study X in science...

It does mean everyone gets an equal footing, and the bad teachers don't slack off and just not teach anything but it does get increadably boring after reading the 40th poem of the NEAB Anthology.

Re:banning (3, Insightful)

ejaw5 (570071) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096772)

Although she probably should have stood up for principles, its a different story when you have a family to feed, house and car to pay off, etc etc. Its the same deal when my HS AP English teacher came under fire for teaching Ginsberg's "Howl" poem. He certainly gave some resistance, but he did say utimately there's a balance between being 'right' and appeasing superiors.

So sad..... (1, Interesting)

MrAnnoyanceToYou (654053) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096601)

The Anarchist's Cookbook doesn't even make the list... I mean, is all this stuff really that dangerous?

Re:So sad..... (2, Informative)

orrigami (769691) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096663)

But it really did make the list. #57

Re:So sad..... (2, Funny)

PythonCodr (731083) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096701)

But it really did make the list. #57

Right ... just below James and the Giant Peach. Who knew that homemade bombs were less dangerous than imaginary bugs... ?

#57 Anarchist Cookbook by William Powell (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10096703)

'nuff said.

Re:So sad..... (1)

mrmag00 (200868) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096707)

wow, stupid mod and stupid poster.

57. The Anarchist Cookbook by William Powell

It wasn't the whole Where's Waldo series... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10096608)

...it was in particular Where's Waldo: Waldo Has 2 Daddies.

Good U Penn Article (4, Informative)

Geiger581 (471105) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096611)

here [upenn.edu] .

Not a list, but has a good portion of the books and actually gives inciteful commentary.

How about... (-1, Offtopic)

grub (11606) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096612)


... the removal of goatse.cx from the world because of one uptight bitch on Christmas Island? Sure, it was an eyesore but who is she to decide what's right?

I hope her uterus falls into a campfire.

Re:How about... (0, Offtopic)

DAldredge (2353) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096633)

The TOS of the domain administrator decides what is right. And they decided they didn't think it did.

Re:How about... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10096708)

The administrator of my high school decided 1984 was communist propaganda. Thats OK too!

Re:How about... (4, Funny)

arose (644256) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096649)

30. "The Goats" by Brock Cole

Re:How about... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10096743)

they probably would ban "The Goatse"

Maybe for good reason (5, Funny)

a5cii (620929) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096617)

Harry Potter - encourages children to take drugs, mainly pot

Wheres Waldo - Encourages Stalking

and as for "how to eat fried worms" this obviously encourages animal cruelty

I don't get it (1)

Beaker1 (624539) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096619)

why The House of Spirits by Isabel Allende? why To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee?

Wow... (2, Insightful)

FiReaNGeL (312636) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096620)


I can understand the banning of American Psycho (excellent book by the way), but Sex by Madonna (and lots of sex related books)? In the Internet era... i mean, is this serious? Is this to "protect" children or something? America is weird sometimes...

Weirdest ban go to 'Of mice and men'... What's disturbing in this story? It was obligatory to read it in Highschool for us in Canada.... Does it means Canadians are deviant or something? Can I live an healthy, balanced life after this? I hope so!

Re:Wow... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10096640)

'Of mice and men'... What's disturbing in this story?

Possibly the vaseline glove reference. Remember, tight-asses get puckered most easily.

Re:Wow... (1)

grub (11606) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096656)


Yes, we Canadians are deviants. I had to read "Of Mice and Men". Also, I recall when we had to read "Catcher in the Rye" and our teacher (when reading parts that were deemed important) actually read out loud the "Fuck You" that Holden sees on the wall. No one in class freaked out: it's literature not filth.

Re:Wow... (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10096657)

What the fuck are you smoking?

You understand the reason for banning American Psycho from a school library, but you don't understand the point of banning a book full of madonna naked and in bondage gear, whipping men and engaging in various sexual acts with other men and women, often in public? Do you really think that's appropriate for school?

And "is this to protect the children or something?". -- Why, yes. Uh... Why else do you think people don't allow certain books in school libraries? Who the fuck else would they be protecting? I sure as fuck know my 86 year old grandmother isn't walking down to the local school and sitting in the tiny chairs reading books in their library.

Books are good! (0)

Omnipotent1 (809076) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096622)

Banned books are always good The giver was a good book why ban wheres waldo? Harry potter The choclate war.... all good books

People are stupid. (5, Insightful)

CFBMoo1 (157453) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096639)

No question after seeing the list and finding these.

5. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

56. James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl

88. Where's Waldo? by Martin Hanford

96. How to Eat Fried Worms by Thomas Rockwell

That list is disturbing. The ones I highlited here are some of what I read that really shouldn't be banned in my own opinion. Though I think no book should be banned, it's up to people to shepard their children and decide for themselves.

Re:People are stupid. (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10096679)

it's up to people to shepard their children and decide for themselves.

Tell me, how do you do that?

I mean, seriously - am I supposed to go to school with my child and help them pick a book to read in the school library? Do you really think "the new joy of gay sex" is something that a fourth grade kid needs to be read? And if I request that it not be made available in his school library - how is that wrong? When my child is in school, during school hours, under the guidance of his teachers and administrators and librarians - it's THEIR job to shepard my child.

Re:People are stupid. (1)

suwain_2 (260792) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096744)

5. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

It's been years since I read this, but it apparently has a lot of deep-rooted racism.

56. James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl

I distinctively remember being in grade school and being shocked to find profanity here. I think it was just something like the word "ass," but that's horrible profanity if you're in third grade.

Some have said that Where's Waldo contains nudity somewhere. I've never heard of How to Eat Fried Worms.

list text. (0, Redundant)

MrAnnoyanceToYou (654053) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096651)

Here's a copy of the list for you unlucky fellers not able to get it: (it's in order but sin numbers because of formatting) Scary Stories (Series) by Alvin Schwartz Daddy's Roommate by Michael Willhoite I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou The Chocolate War by Robert Cormier The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck Harry Potter (Series) by J.K. Rowling Forever by Judy Blume Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson Alice (Series) by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor Heather Has Two Mommies by Leslea Newman My Brother Sam is Dead by James Lincoln Collier and Christopher Collier The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger The Giver by Lois Lowry It's Perfectly Normal by Robie Harris Goosebumps (Series) by R.L. Stine A Day No Pigs Would Dieby Robert Newton Peck The Color Purple by Alice Walker Sex by Madonna Earth's Children (Series) by Jean M. Auel The Great Gilly Hopkins by Katherine Paterson A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle Go Ask Alice by Anonymous Fallen Angels by Walter Dean Myers In the Night Kitchen by Maurice Sendak The Stupids (Series) by Harry Allard The Witches by Roald Dahl The New Joy of Gay Sex by Charles Silverstein Anastasia Krupnik (Series) by Lois Lowry The Goats by Brock Cole Kaffir Boy by Mark Mathabane Blubber by Judy Blume Killing Mr. Griffin by Lois Duncan Halloween ABC by Eve Merriam We All Fall Down by Robert Cormier Final Exit by Derek Humphry The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood Julie of the Wolves by Jean Craighead George The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison What's Happening to my Body? Book for Girls: A Growing-Up Guide for Parents & Daughters by Lynda Madaras To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee Beloved by Toni Morrison The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton The Pigman by Paul Zindel Bumps in the Night by Harry Allard Deenie by Judy Blume Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes Annie on my Mind by Nancy Garden The Boy Who Lost His Face by Louis Sachar Cross Your Fingers, Spit in Your Hat by Alvin Schwartz A Light in the Attic by Shel Silverstein Brave New World by Aldous Huxley Sleeping Beauty Trilogy by A.N. Roquelaure (Anne Rice) Asking About Sex and Growing Up by Joanna Cole Cujo by Stephen King James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl The Anarchist Cookbook by William Powell Boys and Sex by Wardell Pomeroy Ordinary People by Judith Guest American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis What's Happening to my Body? Book for Boys: A Growing-Up Guide for Parents & Sons by Lynda Madaras Are You There, God? It's Me, Margaret by Judy Blume Crazy Lady by Jane Conly Athletic Shorts by Chris Crutcher Fade by Robert Cormier Guess What? by Mem Fox The House of Spirits by Isabel Allende The Face on the Milk Carton by Caroline Cooney Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut Lord of the Flies by William Golding Native Son by Richard Wright Women on Top: How Real Life Has Changed Women's Fantasies by Nancy Friday Curses, Hexes and Spells by Daniel Cohen Jack by A.M. Homes Bless Me, Ultima by Rudolfo A. Anaya Where Did I Come From? by Peter Mayle Carrie by Stephen King Tiger Eyes by Judy Blume On My Honor by Marion Dane Bauer Arizona Kid by Ron Koertge Family Secrets by Norma Klein Mommy Laid An Egg by Babette Cole The Dead Zone by Stephen King The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain Song of Solomon by Toni Morrison Always Running by Luis Rodriguez Private Parts by Howard Stern Where's Waldo? by Martin Hanford Summer of My German Soldier by Bette Greene Little Black Sambo by Helen Bannerman Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett Running Loose by Chris Crutcher Sex Education by Jenny Davis The Drowning of Stephen Jones by Bette Greene Girls and Sex by Wardell Pomeroy How to Eat Fried Worms by Thomas Rockwell View from the Cherry Tree by Willo Davis Roberts The Headless Cupid by Zilpha Keatley Snyder The Terrorist by Caroline Cooney Jump Ship to Freedom by James Lincoln Collier and Christopher Collier

Re:list text. (0, Redundant)

MrAnnoyanceToYou (654053) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096672)

F**ing html editor. Scary Stories (Series) by Alvin Schwartz Daddy's Roommate by Michael Willhoite I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou The Chocolate War by Robert Cormier The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck Harry Potter (Series) by J.K. Rowling Forever by Judy Blume Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson Alice (Series) by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor Heather Has Two Mommies by Leslea Newman My Brother Sam is Dead by James Lincoln Collier and Christopher Collier The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger The Giver by Lois Lowry It's Perfectly Normal by Robie Harris Goosebumps (Series) by R.L. Stine A Day No Pigs Would Dieby Robert Newton Peck The Color Purple by Alice Walker Sex by Madonna Earth's Children (Series) by Jean M. Auel The Great Gilly Hopkins by Katherine Paterson A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle Go Ask Alice by Anonymous Fallen Angels by Walter Dean Myers In the Night Kitchen by Maurice Sendak The Stupids (Series) by Harry Allard The Witches by Roald Dahl The New Joy of Gay Sex by Charles Silverstein Anastasia Krupnik (Series) by Lois Lowry The Goats by Brock Cole Kaffir Boy by Mark Mathabane Blubber by Judy Blume Killing Mr. Griffin by Lois Duncan Halloween ABC by Eve Merriam We All Fall Down by Robert Cormier Final Exit by Derek Humphry The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood Julie of the Wolves by Jean Craighead George The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison What's Happening to my Body? Book for Girls: A Growing-Up Guide for Parents & Daughters by Lynda Madaras To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee Beloved by Toni Morrison The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton The Pigman by Paul Zindel Bumps in the Night by Harry Allard Deenie by Judy Blume Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes Annie on my Mind by Nancy Garden The Boy Who Lost His Face by Louis Sachar Cross Your Fingers, Spit in Your Hat by Alvin Schwartz A Light in the Attic by Shel Silverstein Brave New World by Aldous Huxley Sleeping Beauty Trilogy by A.N. Roquelaure (Anne Rice) Asking About Sex and Growing Up by Joanna Cole Cujo by Stephen King James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl The Anarchist Cookbook by William Powell Boys and Sex by Wardell Pomeroy Ordinary People by Judith Guest American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis What's Happening to my Body? Book for Boys: A Growing-Up Guide for Parents & Sons by Lynda Madaras Are You There, God? It's Me, Margaret by Judy Blume Crazy Lady by Jane Conly Athletic Shorts by Chris Crutcher Fade by Robert Cormier Guess What? by Mem Fox The House of Spirits by Isabel Allende The Face on the Milk Carton by Caroline Cooney Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut Lord of the Flies by William Golding Native Son by Richard Wright Women on Top: How Real Life Has Changed Women's Fantasies by Nancy Friday Curses, Hexes and Spells by Daniel Cohen Jack by A.M. Homes Bless Me, Ultima by Rudolfo A. Anaya Where Did I Come From? by Peter Mayle Carrie by Stephen King Tiger Eyes by Judy Blume On My Honor by Marion Dane Bauer Arizona Kid by Ron Koertge Family Secrets by Norma Klein Mommy Laid An Egg by Babette Cole The Dead Zone by Stephen King The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain Song of Solomon by Toni Morrison Always Running by Luis Rodriguez Private Parts by Howard Stern Where's Waldo? by Martin Hanford Summer of My German Soldier by Bette Greene Little Black Sambo by Helen Bannerman Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett Running Loose by Chris Crutcher Sex Education by Jenny Davis The Drowning of Stephen Jones by Bette Greene Girls and Sex by Wardell Pomeroy How to Eat Fried Worms by Thomas Rockwell View from the Cherry Tree by Willo Davis Roberts The Headless Cupid by Zilpha Keatley Snyder The Terrorist by Caroline Cooney Jump Ship to Freedom by James Lincoln Collier and Christopher Collier

Re:list text. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10096713)

You do realize that there is a preview button to the right of the submit button.

Re:list text. (1)

MrAnnoyanceToYou (654053) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096757)

no shit. oh vvell. Got a hint on forcing carriage returns for next time? This vvas my err... 2nd post. lemme
check
something
hrm. Seems to have vvorked.

wow the text version of where's waldo (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10096696)

too bad ctrl-F makes this search too easy though.

A Light in the Attic? (0, Flamebait)

sstory (538486) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096652)

A Light in the Attic is on that list, but the bible isn't? I guess people don't know foul, disturbed literature when they see it.

Is this the most important information? (5, Interesting)

Phanatic1a (413374) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096666)

See, I think that a more important list of which books were banned would be a list of which public institutions did the banning. If there are provincial, backwards-minded, insular communities out there banning books, I'm more interested in knowing where they are than what they're banning.

Pft, whimpy stuff (5, Interesting)

u-238 (515248) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096673)

There are much more serious and interesting instences of banning, like the actual 1995 book burnings of Germar Rudolph's published findings (a German chemist who found evidence showing no signs of Zyklon-B use in Auschwitz other than in delousing chambers). Extreme or not, his publications were literally burned...

And another similar instance [guardian.co.uk] wherein publication was halted and pages were ordered torn out of a medical study which showed people of Jewish ancestry to be significantly genetically linked to the Arab and Palestinian population.

Re:Pft, whimpy stuff (0)

Ieshan (409693) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096776)

I don't like responding to these kinds of Posts, but this time, I'll be serious.

On the absolutely absurd presumption that they didn't use Zyklon-B, exactly what happened to the 12 million people (including 6 million Jews)? Killed in other ways?

Perhaps your point wasn't to sound antisemetic or revisionist, though the tone of your post certainly seems that way. What gives?

Section? (1, Offtopic)

bhirsch (785803) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096674)

Why is this under YRO? It seems like if it's not under Main, Books would be the most appropriate section.

what? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10096676)

This kinda stuff makes me sick.

I've had it with the righteous ultra-right religious sickos. How about replacing all library books with bibles?

Man get some IQ.

Go ahead. Mod me flamebait.

A Wrinkle in Time (5, Interesting)

Citizen_Kang (35179) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096680)

A Wrinkle in Time is apparently banned because it contains magic and "new age" nonsense. (http://solonor.com/bannedbooks/archives/001742.ht ml [solonor.com] ). Oddly enough, Madeline L'Engle was openly Christian, known to run with other prominant Christian authors like C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien. It boggles the mind.

that's kind of harsh terminology, man (1)

nomadic (141991) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096768)

Was? She's still alive, you know...

Ban Slashdot ! (2, Funny)

bushboy (112290) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096681)

Slashdot encourages normally quiet and law abiding Geeks to question authority !

Ban teh Slashdot now !

What books get banned over seas? (3, Interesting)

Shivetya (243324) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096686)

Out of curiosity what gets banned overseas? I would figure most NAZI related material isn't permitted in France, Germany, or similar countries.

Required Reading (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10096692)

Its amazing how many of the books on that list were required reading in my public schools in California... Huck Finn (4th grade I think), Bridge to Terabithia (6th), Of Mice and Men (9th), The Catcher in the Rye (10th), A Brave New World (11th), A Wrinkle in Time, James and the Giant Peach (1st... okay, so the teacher read it to us), A Light in the Attic (2nd.. same), Lord of the Flies (10th), etc. etc...

If anyone needs any proof these books have messed us Californians up... Well, we did elect Arnold.

My fav school read (2, Interesting)

flyneye (84093) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096702)

Aahhh fourth grade,I remember our weekly trips to the school library.I remember the FIT my grandmother had when she saw I had not only a book on "body language but also Xaviera Hollanders "The Happy Hooker"(who the f**k knows how it got in there)hell,I was just impressed with the pretty lady on the cover,what did I know in 4th grade.
I had actually read about half of it before the old bat got her grabbers on it.
come to think of it I probably owe my love of reading to porn and comic books at a young age.
I mean c'mon granny,Im MENSA now,read everything you never approved of and more and you're just worm food who never had any fun.
Lets rethink this censorship thing.If you want kids to read,you have to LET them want to read.If johnny is gonna learn by reading The Necronomicon,Philosophy in the Bedroom or the Republican National Platform,LET HIM.
He may be a little different,but he's not gonna be an illiterate welfare baby if you let him develop some intellect.

Banned books. (1)

gunix (547717) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096714)

Well.
Someone once said, "where they burn books, they will soon start burning people".

This has happend many times in history... and someone said that "What we learn from history, is that we never learn from history and are bound to repeat the same mistakes"

2003? (2, Informative)

Malk-a-mite (134774) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096718)

Is there some secret link in the story that doesn't go to a page that says:
"The 100 Most Frequently Challenged Books of 1990-2000"

I know late stories go up sometimes and sometimes /. mods don't actually look at the links, but isn't this pushing it a bit?

Don't forget... (-1, Flamebait)

artemis67 (93453) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096720)

Unfit for Command [scotsman.com]

he New Joy of Gay Sex by Charles Silverstein??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10096727)

Does anyone know anything about this book? I'm afraid to look it up on Amazon.com for fear that my buyer's profile will recieve nothing but gay themed book suggestions from now on.

Absurd! (1)

meckardt (113120) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096732)

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn? The Adventures of Tom Sawyer??? This is what they're keeping away from kids? Perhaps they'll ban Dr. Suess next.

A number of the other titles on that list were REQUIRED READING when I was in HS (and younger). Evidently the standards are chaning for the worse.

No. (1)

amalcon (472105) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096735)

I understand some of these, but some just make no sense.

The Adventures of "Huckleberry Finn" and "Of Mice and Men" are widely recognized great pieces of literature. "The Catcher in the Rye" isn't on that same level, but it's still up there. "A Wrinkle in Time" and "The Giver" are about the only popular thought-provoking children's science fiction/fantasy books. That's just in the top fifteen.

What really did it for me was "A Light in the Attic." Seriously. How many of you developed your appreciation of poetry as a child largely due to this book?

boys vs. girls (1)

lockholm (703003) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096736)

An interesting contrast:
coming in at #40: What's Happening to my Body? Book for Girls: A Growing-Up Guide for Parents & Daughters by Lynda Madaras

and at #61: What's Happening to my Body? Book for Boys: A Growing-Up Guide for Parents & Sons by Lynda Madaras

Clearly, it's better for boys to learn about their bodies. I wonder what the rationale was for libraries that chose to ban one book and not the other.

The real reason (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10096738)

Nobody comes out and says it outloud, but the real reason these books are banned: they contain advertising for products that are competitors to the schools' and libraries' official sponsors. :-P

Highly Recommend (1)

artlu (265391) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096739)

A book entitled "The Alchemist." Basically, a short story about following omens and doing what you really want in life, etc. Maybe finding something you didn't know existed that could make everything better.

A quick 3-4 hour read that is definitely worth it.

gShares.net [gshares.net]

Not really "banned" just "challenged" (1, Informative)

AwesomeJT (525759) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096745)

The webpage lists the top 100 challenged books. Of which I can understand why. Saying a book is challenged is like saying "I don't agree with this" and nothing more. If that were the case, I would agree with any book dealing with Sex, Homosexuality and the like for children in grade school. Stuff like that should be left to the parents to explain. Other books, I have no idea why. Certain Mark Twain has written some interesting things which challenge us, but Huck Finn ain't one of them. And the lot of others I grew up reading or seeing as PBS "After School Specials" -- I mean really? Give me a break.

Of course, nothing will substitute for good parenting. Parents should keep certain materials away from their children until they can understand it. If parents don't do their jobs, some one else will -- and those people won't exactly share your same values.

BTW, the link goes to the 1990-2000 list, where's the 2003 list?

Some ban them, some use them in class... (1)

Dark Nexus (172808) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096749)

Most of the non-Shakespeare books I had to read in high school english classes are on that list...

Required reading (1)

Zackbass (457384) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096751)

What amazes me about the list is that 80% of the required reading that I did at my school (just a normal public school) is on the list. The idea of someone graduating high school without having read several of them truly troubles me.

Oh, the irony... (1)

sockonafish (228678) | more than 10 years ago | (#10096767)

How can you read The Giver, and then ban it? That's like banning 1984.
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