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U.S. to Require Passport To Re-Enter Country

Zonk posted more than 9 years ago | from the friendly-greeting dept.

Privacy 1223

The Hobo writes "The CBC is reporting that starting in 2007, most Canadians will require a passport to cross into the United States and by 2008 Americans who crossed freely into Canada will be unable to return to the United States without a passport. The tougher new rules still allow Canadians to cross without being fingerprinted, but every person from any other country will be required to submit to fingerprinting." From the article: "Currently, Canadians and Americans are able to enter the United States with little more identification than a driver's licence or a birth certificate, though a passport has sometimes made it simpler to satisfy immigration officers at the border."

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Mexico, Eh? (5, Funny)

Tackhead (54550) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147204)

> Currently, Canadians and Americans are able to enter the United States with little more identification than a driver's licence or a birth certificate, though a passport has sometimes made it simpler to satisfy immigration officers at the border.

What's the big deal? Canadians and Americans still don't need passports to get home, nor do they need to worry about fingerprinting.

If you're an American without a passport, just come back through California, Mexico, and Arizona. The desert's hot, you'll pick up lots of dust, and after a few days' hiking, you'll have picked up a nice Mexican tan. Se Habla Espanol! You're in!

If you're a Canadian without a passport, remember that you're indistinguishable from the American as long as you remember to pronounce it "owwwwt" (like you stubbed your toe), instead of "oot" (like if you're going oot and aboot), and if you can pretend that Budweiser is beer for a few days. Grab a six-pack of Bud for your American friend and follow him across the desert. Then take a US domestic flight (for which no passport is required) to New York State. Go to the Six Nations Reserve and offer to haul some smokes 'n' booze in across the St. Lawrence. If it's winter, you can even walk home, eh?

Or remotely sniff the RFID off some other poor schlub and just use his passport.

Seriously, what's the big deal? Don't have a passport, go to Mexico, eh? :)

Re:Mexico, Eh? (5, Insightful)

sachmet (10423) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147241)

You didn't read the article, did you? "And by 2008, most Americans who visit Canada won't be able to re-enter their country without a passport." You sure *will* need a passport to come home. I don't know what will happen if you don't have it, but you can bet it won't be pleasant or speedy.

The big secret (3, Funny)

chipmeister (802507) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147269)

I bet they will still let people in without a passport. Only Americans would be naive enough to leave their country without one. Thus proof of citizenship!

Re:The big secret (2, Funny)

mencik (516959) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147294)

Just bring your American Express card. Never leave home without it!

Re:Mexico, Eh? (5, Funny)

schon (31600) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147289)

If you're an American without a passport, just come back through California, Mexico, and Arizona.

Yes, because these states all share a border with Canada, right?

I think you might wanna brush up on your geography a little.

Because passports are never wrong! (5, Insightful)

sachmet (10423) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147206)

Because, as we all know, passports are never forged [washingtontimes.com] . Ever. [freerepublic.com]

I don't see how we are more "protected" than the current system [house.gov] .

Re:Because passports are never wrong! (3, Informative)

garcia (6573) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147273)

I see it has being used when Passports are mandated to include RFID tags. By then, if the lawmakers get their way, cars will have them imbedded in tires to track their movements (of course it's all for the best interests of the USA's citizens and not to fill the coffers of local governments).

The US will then be able to track the movements of its citizens around the Interstates and across the border. It will then know when you left, when you came back, and where you went after.

It will all be a part of your little running history.

Keep RFID tags out of cars, passports, items in stores, etc.

Re:Because passports are never wrong! (1)

surefooted1 (838360) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147456)

That's when you go greyhound or fly. ;-)

passport? (1)

swimmar132 (302744) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147207)

What if I lose it?

Re:passport? (4, Funny)

jdreed1024 (443938) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147220)

What if I lose it?

That could never happen to me, as my voice is my passport. Please verify me.

Re:passport? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12147253)

Uh, I've lost my voice on several occasions.

Re:passport? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12147421)

But how can you show your passport . . . if you are unable to speak?

Re:passport? (5, Informative)

eobanb (823187) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147258)

Then you need to go to the American embassy, and they'll help you re-enter the country. This is true for entry into the US from almost anywhere.

Re:passport? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12147266)

Uhh...go to the nearest US consulate and get a new one. Pretty much the same thing that you do now.

Re:passport? (1)

lurch_mojoff (867210) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147332)

Have you seen this good movie called "The Terminal".

Well, if you lose your US passport in Canada, you'll feel like Tom Hanks' character is a lucky son of a b...

You get my drift.

Re:passport? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12147382)

What if I lose it?

I always travel with my expired passport, spare pictures, notarized birth certificate and a copy of my current passport kept separate from my passport. If I lose my passport, the embassy will have no trouble getting me a new one. Since travel is part of my job, it's part of my job to make sure nothing goes wrong.

Re:passport? (1)

thenextpresident (559469) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147440)

You go to the American embassy.

ahem. (1)

eobanb (823187) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147219)

Americans, leave while you still can.

So if I "lose" my passport while in Canada... (1)

johnny cashed (590023) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147262)

Can I stay there?

Re:So if I "lose" my passport while in Canada... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12147326)

Sure...in jail, that is.

What's next? Interstate travel? (4, Insightful)

Ydna (32354) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147221)

Shouldn't be too long before interstate travel in the US requires a passport. That'll finally put an end to criminals moving to another state to hide from the law.

Re:What's next? Interstate travel? (2, Interesting)

kaszeta (322161) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147327)

Shouldn't be too long before interstate travel in the US requires a passport.

Sometimes I think that this might actually happen.

Consider this: on one of my regular drives, it's not unusual for me to be pulled over, asked for identification, where I was coming from, and where I'm headed to, and if the officer doesn't like my answers (or I decline to answer), I get to wait until they've checked my ID and vehicle information over.

Seriously, having my US Passport is handy (and I'm about as honky-appearing as they come, I feel sorry for the foreign-appearing folks around here)

Where does this happen? No, this isn't the desert Southwest. This is Interstate 91 in Vermont [vnews.com] , 100 miles from the US-Canada border.

Re:What's next? Interstate travel? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12147368)

It's modded funny, but it's not really far from the truth.

Interstate travel in the US already requires full identification, logged permanently by the government -- that is, if you want to travel at a tolerable speed. Unless you're wealthy enough to afford a personal jet, you can't fly without the equivalent of showing a passport. (see freetotravel.org [freetotravel.org] )

This situation is only getting worse. Even interstate buses and trains now usually require ID for ticket purchases.

YRO? (1)

slacktide (796664) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147224)

Isn't this more like "Your Rights Offline" than "Your Rights Online?"

Re:YRO? (3, Funny)

stecoop (759508) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147301)

Your Rights Offline

No, you'll have to go online to get a good fake passport.

Re:YRO? (5, Funny)

jinzumkei (802273) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147343)

Your Rights Offline is still YRO. Yay for spelling!

I-5 is the Information Superhighway (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12147414)

What? You're not using the free WiFi at the Peace Arch?

I remember when.. (5, Interesting)

neoform (551705) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147226)

i was able to cross the border just by telling the customs agent where i was going and for how long..

Re:I remember when.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12147276)

Into Canada?
Getting back into the us is always harder than getting into Canada for some reason. Even when I was a kid, I can remember how easily we got into Canada. There has always been some crap with getting back in the U.S.

Re:I remember when.. (5, Interesting)

panda (10044) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147315)

Yes, and so do I.

I once went to Canada with three Japanese students who were studying in America. When we got to the Canadian border control, I went inside the office with them in case they had linguistic problems. The official there looked at each of their passports, looked at their visas for the U.S., then stamped that they'd entered Canada.

He looked to me with his hand out as if expecting another passport. I simply answered, "I'm a citizen." He smiled and let us through.

The Americans did check my driver's license on the way back, though.

'Course, this was 15 years ago.....

Phew! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12147228)


That'll stop Terr'rists! The 9/11 hijackers had legit ID, sheesh. More scare tactics to make you feel safe as the government takes away your freedom of movement.

Re:Phew! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12147323)

Actually, they didn't have legit ID. They had student visas which, had the INS been on the ball, would have been an instant indicator that they were not where they should have been and were not doing what they should have been doing.

Oh, and the government hasn't taken away any freedom of movement with this ruling, by the way.

Nice troll, though.

Re:Phew! (1)

portwojc (201398) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147345)

As the government takes away freedom of your movement? I didn't see anything in the article mentioning freedom of movement being stopped.

Re:Phew! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12147408)


As the government takes away freedom of your movement? I didn't see anything in the article mentioning freedom of movement being stopped.


And if you don't have your passport, you can't get into the country, whereas you could before. That's what an open border implies. Even if you're a US citizen, if you lose your passport you may not be able to get in. That sounds like it'd stop your freedom of movement in the country pretty well if you ask me.

Re:Phew! (3, Insightful)

badasscat (563442) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147442)

That'll stop Terr'rists! The 9/11 hijackers had legit ID, sheesh. More scare tactics to make you feel safe as the government takes away your freedom of movement.

Last time I travelled to Japan I was required to show my passport upon re-entering the United States. Last time I travelled to Europe (more than ten years ago!), same thing.

The deal we had with Canada was a special thing. You don't have any "right" to travel to another country and then re-enter without a passport. In fact, most countries require it - including the United States in every other case (except now with Mexico - and you can bet the DHS is looking at that now too).

This is just closing a loophole in the current immigration system. I don't see why Americans should continue to be able to get away without even owning a passport when practically every other citizen of the civilized world carries one pretty much wherever they go. There's no reason for us to be smug about our backwardness.

what? (2, Funny)

zerkon (838861) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147230)

no more driving across the peace bridge to get plastered between the fragile ages of 19 and 21? I mean I could but I'd probly forget where I put my passport...


aww who cares by then I'll be 21 anyway

The Good News: (1)

elefantstn (195873) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147233)

We can look forward to the end of the "only 1 in 5 Americans has a passport" troll.

Re:The Good News: (-1, Flamebait)

garcia (6573) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147307)

Yeah because I really want to travel to a country that openly disallows the discussions of one of their most embarassing political follies ever from the country that disallows its citizens to be as free as they once were.

Perhaps you want me to cross the Pond and end up in a country where they have more video cameras than people? Perhaps you want me to go to China?

So tell me again why I need a passport?

Re:The Good News: (1)

smcavoy (114157) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147418)

maybe you should read up on shit you comment on.
The publication ban was put in place by a JUDGE not the party in power, to PROTECT that persons right to a fair trial. And guess what, it's NOT PERMANENT. geez.
And just when the hell were we "more" free?

returning americans (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12147234)

Americans who crossed freely into Canada will be unable to return to the United States without a passport Damn, does that mean we're stuck with them then?

Say goodbye (3, Interesting)

Dark Coder (66759) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147237)

"Goodbye, my Canadian friends."

"Goodbye, those funky round flat bacon, hockey teams.."

"Goodbye, to those maple leaf brothers."

The door will go from wide-open to slightly ajar....

(sigh)

Re:Say goodbye (5, Insightful)

neoform (551705) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147298)

it's sad but true, the Bush administration is alienating canada like no other administration in US history..

from the beef ban to the tarifs on soft wood, now tightening the border only makes canadians not want to vacation in the US.. or for that matter have anything to do with americans.. which is a shame really.

Re:Say goodbye (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12147409)

I'd have no problem with this were I to need a passport to enter http://kenlayne.com/new_map.jpg [kenlayne.com] Jesusland. I'd never have to use it, except maybe to go to New Orleans.

When I read stuff like this I can't help but hope Canada (and the rest of the world) realizes that there's 49% of us who shake our heads at most of this administration's decisions.

Re:Say goodbye (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12147455)

Canadians aren't the only ones they're alienating. I flew over to the US from an EU state on Sunday for a 2 week business trip and had to get my fingers scanned and a photo taken on entry into the country. I'm really very unhappy about being treated this way, and I'm sure everyone I was queueing with felt the same.

America has ceased to be a country that others might aspire to. Other countries have experienced terrorism for many decades without becoming so draconian, so it's funny that the US, the supposed land of the free, overreacted so dramatically.

It's a crying shame really...

how hard would it be eh? (4, Funny)

b17bmbr (608864) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147242)

to figure out eh who is a canadian eh? im mean eh, it's aboot national secoority eh. so, if it makes the US safer, eh, then it should be okay eh.

right on (1, Insightful)

Weh (219305) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147243)

yeah, the global war on terror is used as an excuse for the current regimes totalitarian tendencies. You americans better read 1984.

Re:right on (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12147293)

I read it. Hmm...pretty much no relationship to what's going on in the US. On the other hand, if /. is your only exposure to the "truth" abou the US political system, I can see why you have such a skewed view of it.

Re:right on (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12147370)

Yes, groupthink, propaganda, frequent imperialist wars, the assualt on civil liberties (FCC, Patriot Act), calling people who do not support the war "seditious" or "unpatriotic", and etc. are NOT AT ALL like what happened in 1984.

Re:right on (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12147351)

Fuck 1984. Read Homage To Catalonia.

Re:right on (1)

mikael (484) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147361)

Or read the Conversatron [conversatron.com]

Re:right on (2, Insightful)

fenris_23 (634852) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147386)


How do you think our government came up with these crazy ideas?

thanks England.

Re:right on (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12147444)

yeah, the global war on terror is used as an excuse for the current regimes totalitarian tendencies. You americans better read 1984.

Maybe if you Canucks would stop allowing so many arabs into your country then we wouldn't have to go to these measures. As it stands I'm glad the US sealing that border.

Drivers License? Used to be freer than that (5, Interesting)

CrazyTalk (662055) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147244)

I grew up in Buffalo, NY so going back and forth to Canada was as regular an occurence as going to the mall. Only once was I asked for any kind of ID whatsoever, and that was because I was with a British citizen. Usually they would just ask you "Citizen of what country" and if you said "USA" they would wave you in.

Used to be freer than that (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12147365)

Used to be freer than that

Man, I've been hearing that my whole life (sigh).

Re:Drivers License? Used to be freer than that (1)

Jonavin (71006) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147381)

It also helps to be the right skin colour and accent, or at least not the "wrong" ones.

I get waved through all the time too. My cousin, on the other hand, has gotten his car ripped apart.

Re:Drivers License? Used to be freer than that (1)

beckett (27524) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147446)

well, it was nice and convenient to travel down to washington with nothing but a driver's license. i live in vancouver and i dip across the border once a few times a month to get gas becuase it's just a little way out of my aimless daily commute. now i gotta carry a passport with me? that extra hassle isn't worth it, and a lot of border towns that rely on crossborder shopping are gonna be SOL.

i have a lot of american friends that travel to canada on a whim and with minimal ID. too bad they won't be let back into their own country now without a damn passport.

yet another reason (5, Insightful)

crabpeople (720852) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147247)

to NOT travel to the USA

come to canada instead [travelcanada.ca] - all of the beauty - none of the ph34r

Re:yet another reason (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12147338)

The fact that Canada has laws against opinions that are contrary to popularly accepted historical views is enough to scare me from going.

How Canada treated Ernst Zundel should be enough to send a chill down anyone's spine, no matter if you share his extermist views or nor.

Is this (1)

computerme (655703) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147248)

Is this what he means when he says:

Freedom is on the march(TM)

internal passports next (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12147427)

"Freedom is on the march(TM)" --

Just make sure your papers are in order before going out into the street.

Not really a 'rights' issue (4, Insightful)

Staplerh (806722) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147254)

The CBC is reporting that starting in 2007, most Canadians will require a passport to cross into the United States and by 2008 Americans who crossed freely into Canada will be unable to return to the United States without a passport. The tougher new rules still allow Canadians to cross without being fingerprinted, but every person from any other country will be required to submit to fingerprinting.

Now, it's my understanding that a sovereign country can control their borders in any way they see fit. Perhaps there's some sort of rights argument to be made about the americans who need a passport to re-enter their country, although it doesn't seem like a major issue, but Canadians.. heck, I'm a Canadian, and it doesn't really effect our rights. America can do whatever they want with their borders to non-citizens. If they don't want to let us come in, heck, that really is their perogative.

Re:Not really a 'rights' issue (5, Insightful)

ergo98 (9391) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147325)

Well if you see yourself as a part of a larger community, it can be construed as a rights issue. Really though it's no big deal - get a passport. The only people who will be hurt are the idiots that don't plan ahead, and then boohoo to the media about how unfair the system is.

It is telling, however, that Canada and the US, two of the most alike and intertwined countries on the planet, are moving apart, while at the same time the enormously diverse European Union acts in many ways like a single country.

Re:Not really a 'rights' issue (1)

greed (112493) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147416)

Well if you see yourself as a part of a larger community, it can be construed as a rights issue.

I cannot speak to the American constitution, but the Canadian constitution provides for the right of both exit and entry. So they cannot put barriers to entry in the way of Canadian citizens; in particular, requiring a difficult to obtain non-free document would not be constitutional.

(Those of us who do our own taxes, don't have a regular GP, and are athiests, and work in software generally do not know people allowed to sign your passport application.)

YRO? (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12147256)

How is this related to my rights online?

Boundary Waters (1)

TykeClone (668449) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147272)

In high school, I went to the Boundary Waters canoe area (lots of fun - I'd recommend it). We stayed on the US side most of the time, but just there are no controls whatsoever there. We just popped over to Canada for lunch one day.

Whew! (3, Funny)

SoupGuru (723634) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147281)

With that gaping security hole closed up I can finally sleep at night knowing I'm safe from all the bad people in the world.

Yeah, but which passport? (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147282)

I've got two - a US one and a Canadian one.

Born in the USA.

It's just a plot by the man to stick us with RFIDs we don't want.

Re:Yeah, but which passport? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12147438)

When entering the US, you *always* must use your US passport, if you are a US citizen. Dumbass. They should have citizenship tests also include intelligence tests so that idiots like you don't get a citizenship that you don't deserve.

You know (1)

Tebriel (192168) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147285)

The article says you can get a special border crossing card so you don't need your passport (at least for Canadiens). So what's the big deal?

Harder for me to come back? (1, Flamebait)

DogDude (805747) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147291)

With all of the crazy bullshit going on in this country right now, why do they think that Americans will WANT to come back? I'm worried about travelling right now, because if I find a place that isn't run by religious fundamentalists, I may just decide to stay!

Re:Harder for me to come back? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12147387)

Some of us are entranced by the classic American idea, I have my home, don't tread on me. Freedom and all that jazz. I'm not leaving home forever to forget my family and friends. I'm staying to try and fix it.

Funny how that sounds like the choice that people in the USSR had.

Re:Harder for me to come back? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12147401)

I'm worried about travelling right now, because if I find a place that isn't run by religious fundamentalists, I may just decide to stay!

You will be missed.

Strange.. (0, Troll)

broothal (186066) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147302)

All Soviet Russia jokes aside, it's alarming how much the US resembles the old USSR. Impossible to get in and out of without a cavity search. Anything you say on the phone will be potentially picked up by the government, and privacy is virtually non-existant.

Re:Strange.. (5, Insightful)

donutello (88309) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147415)

Since when did producing a passport become the equivalent of a cavity search?

Idiotic statements like yours lead me to believe you are uneducated and don't understand the horrors that the Soviets put their citizens through.

Re:Strange.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12147452)

In Soviet Russia, all of you are aside the jokes!

Online Rights? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12147317)

What the hell does this subject have to do with "rights online"? Looks like just another execuse for liberals to complain that the U.S. needs and open-border policy (not that we don't already, considering the millions of ILLEGAL immigrants that are here already)

Going to Canada (1)

dema (103780) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147319)

Not long ago some friends and I went to a show in Detroit and on the way home we randomly decided to take the bridge over to Canada. Upon entering Canada the woman asked us what our intentions were and the person driving said "I don't know, we just want to check out Canada." or something like that. So she waved us on without any other questions or ID checks and we went to Essex and got a pizza.

On the way back, however, the guy asked to see all of our licenses, questioned each of us about a variety of things, and did a search of the vehicle's trunk. All in all it took about twenty minutes. The same thing appeared to happen to the two vehicles before us.

Probably not worth drawing any serious conclusions, but I found the distinction to be rather amusing (:

Think of the children (5, Insightful)

The Hobo (783784) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147320)

I submitted the story, and forgot to include this as food for thought:

Think of a typical family of four. My own just did this. Say this family wants to go to Disneyland from Canada. As it stands, my parents were able to go with the young'ns without a problem, and none of them have passports. Tourists from Canada are a part of the US economy. Had the passports been required, it would have cost [pptc.gc.ca] : 87 + 87 + 37 + 37, plust GST, which is a total of 265.36$, and that doesn't even include the trouble of finding a guarantor and taking passport photos which cost more than normal photos. This is on top of any other travel costs, likely for a single trip. This will most definitely deter Canadians from visiting and spending money in the US. Not to mention that passports take at least 3 weeks to get, ruling out any sudden decisions to say pick a US ski package to a Canadian one. I personally enjoy taking trips to the US, but this makes it much harder, and I'm certain this scenario will be repeated.

Not an issue (0, Offtopic)

Mike Hawk (687615) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147397)

You don't want to go to Disneyland anyway. That place has gone to hell recently. Deaths, closed and broken rides, no Captain Eo. Forget it.

Re:Think of the children (4, Interesting)

kebes (861706) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147433)

You are correct, but your figures were assuming that the family only takes one out-of-country trip every 5 years. The real tourist money probably comes from people that travel more often. Those people (families) will have up-to-date passports anyway (even for the kids), and it won't be a matter of getting a new passport, but just bringing your current passport. Most people I know have a valid passport at all times anyway, for one reason or another.

As you say, this will decrease the number of "impulse tourists" who don't otherwise travel abroad, but I doubt this will put a serious dent in the US tourism budget. Those people will probably just deal with the longer line at the border to get the proper tourist card or whatever.

Re:Think of the children (1)

Jonavin (71006) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147443)

Good points but most Canadians I know have active passports. This is less common in the USA. So if anything, it will deter USian tourists from visitting Canada, if our raising dollar hasn't already done that.

So as far as tourism goes. This is a net gain for the USA.

How is this "online"? (2, Insightful)

Wubby (56755) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147339)

Don't mean to be picky (ok, maybe I do), but how is this story about "Rights Online"? Politics maybe. I agree there may be a rights issue. Big Brother Bush wanting to ensure that we all stay adequatly Nationalist and all, but I troll...

YRO, IIRC, is "Your Rights Online". And don't say, "Your reading it online, right?" 'Cause that would be "Your Rights, Online".

War on Terror..... oops... I mean Tourism (5, Funny)

herbicidal maniac (861052) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147344)

Be very very wary.... the War on Tourism will be a long hard road.... there may even be tourists living on your street. Your next door neighbor may be a tourist, report any suspicious activities. We will not stop until we have eliminated the scourge of touism from our land. They are all around you, checking out our national treasures.

The EU (5, Interesting)

mindstrm (20013) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147352)

The EU, and the rest of the world, should call the American's bluff on this one.. just not produce the new funky passports to appease the US.

Further, I hope Canada reciprocates and requires americans to have valid passports.

"I forgot my passport day" (3, Interesting)

aapold (753705) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147354)

Sounds like a plan for a series of protests against this policy, if people feel strongly enough about it. Pick a day, and a time, and forget your passport. Have literature on each of your cars... (I think it would work better at land crossings where you can tie up more people)...

Deportation (3, Funny)

The One and Only (691315) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147366)

What if Canada deports me? I'm screwed!

WHAT? (1)

DrugCheese (266151) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147369)

I thought thats what passports where used for?

Shows how ignorant I am.

Give Us Your Tired, Your Poor, Your Huddled Masses (5, Insightful)

fastpage (125435) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147371)

As long as they have proper documentation and identification. Otherwise its...

"I'm sorry sir, but your papers are not in order.."

Does anyone else find it hilarious... (1)

Anita Coney (648748) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147377)

That it's easier [chronwatch.com] to get into the US from Mexico than it is from Canada?! Any terrorist could simply walk across the border into Texas without any impediment by the government. But yet an American citizen will not be allowed cross the Canadian border?! Strange stuff!

Fingerprinting? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12147379)

People going into USA has to submit their fingerprints?! Whoa!

you already need a passport, sometimes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12147389)

I drove up to Alaska this summer from the lower 48 so I ended up crossing back into the US a number of times along the way (took some side trips). I would highly recommend taking a passport with you even now. I got a lot of grief from one border patrol guy in particluar, he was a complete asshole about me not having a passport. Said he could lock me up if he wanted to. Total prick. The other 2 times I crossed back into the US I had no problems. But take your passport with you just in case.

Currently able to enter? someone tell these guys (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12147400)

Currently, Canadians and Americans are able to enter the United States with little more identification than a driver's licence or a birth certificate, though a passport has sometimes made it simpler to satisfy immigration officers at the border."

Unless ofcourse your one of them. See Here [islamonline.net]

Yeah, not gonna happen. (2, Interesting)

DroopyStonx (683090) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147407)

I'm SO sure that people living in Detroit who go over to Casino Windsor.. then to return will find themselves barred from the country without a passport.

Not gonna happen.

what about when the shoe is on the other foot? (4, Insightful)

the-build-chicken (644253) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147411)

U.S. citizens get pretty pissed off [cnn.com] when you try and fingerprint them as they enter another country. And more countries will follow suit with this. The principle of reciprocality is enforced by most nations on this planet....so get ready to be fingerprinted U.S. citizens...you treat guests in your country like criminals, and we'll treat you the same way if you ever come to ours...only we'll probably dick you around for 9 hours in the airport as a bit of payback.

Your Rights Online? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12147420)

What does this have to do with "Your Rights _Online_"? This story only applies to people who actually leave their keyboards once in awhile.

Saw this on CNN (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12147428)

CNN said this is being done to prevent terrorism. I have some questions. Did any of the 9/11 hijackers enter the US through Mexico or Canada? Does this appear to be another case of lawmakers and politicians trying to look "tough on terrorism" when what they are doing has little, or nothing, to do with terrorism?

Seems Reasonable (1, Insightful)

n-baxley (103975) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147431)

This seems perfectly reasonable. If you leave one gaping hole in US border patrol, like the entire northern border, then you may as well not patrol the other borders. Yes it's possible to forge a passport, but with 50 differnet formats and much lower security, dirvers licenses are much easier to get and to forge. This will certainly cut down on tourism on both sides of the border, but without it the border patrol is really missing a big loophole.

And for those of you who say "What next?! Papers at the state border?" Give me a break this is nowhere near that extreme and you should know it.

They won't be caught out again (1)

panurge (573432) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147435)

The CIA is making sure it doesn't get caught with its pants down on the 200th anniversary of 1812. They're going to make sure that the Brits, the Canadians and the Indians don't just walk in and burn down the White House a second time. (Yes, I know it was actually in 1814, but the war officially started in 1812.)

M$ again (1)

jlebrech (810586) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147445)

Is that Microsoft again, you can go anywhere without one of those passport things nowadays.

Kinder, Safer Nation (5, Insightful)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 9 years ago | (#12147451)

Because the assholes who planebombed NYC and DC all had passports, were known terrorists, and were connected on the record with the assholes who bombed the WTC in 1993. Mohammed Atta's passport was somehow found fluttering atop the burning steel slag of the WTC - even tougher than the 2 planes' 4 blackbox recorders, which have never been reported found. I feel safer already.
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