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Singaporean University Snubs Lauded (But Anti-Censorship) Professor

timothy posted about a year and a half ago | from the just-a-coincidence dept.

Censorship 48

New submitter nifty-c writes "Singapore has invested heavily in higher education partnerships with the U.S. and launched an ambitious program of high-tech research with Western countries, but recent events have opened these links to controversy. Prof. Cherian George at Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore, is a communication and information school professor and an outspoken critic of his government's censorship of the Internet. NTU recently fired him, sparking an outcry from critics who claim political interference. This week a group of faculty and affiliates at Harvard's Berkman Center for Internet & Society has 'strongly caution[ed]...colleagues working in the area of Internet and society in any dealings with Singaporean universities.'"

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Wait a minute (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43123831)

1. This article said the man was "fired". Actually he was an associate professor who was denied tenure, i.e. a substantial promotion. Lots of associate professors are denied tenure in every major university every year, and frequently there are cries of discrimination, favoritism, cronyism, etc.

2. In order to get tenure in a major university, a candidate should be distinguished in his or her field (being considered a great teacher is nice, but that and $2 gets a cup of coffee when it comes to tenure decisions). This guy seemed to be best known for his harsh criticism of the government of Singapore... which the university depends on in many ways! Yeah, that sounds likely that they would want that guy on board.

Re:Wait a minute (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43123901)

The Slashdot summary makes me question what is happening to the English language. Thanks for the translation...

Re:Wait a minute (1)

Hal_Porter (817932) | about a year and a half ago | (#43128223)

Honestly Americans have made such a mess of English that at this point you're better off learning Mandarin which is a hen3 hao3ting1 de yu3yan2.

Re:Wait a minute (5, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about a year and a half ago | (#43123909)

1. You do realize that being denied tenure is closer to being fired at/before the end of a probationary period, not passed over for promotion from fry cook to shift manager? It is true that the ongoing trend toward permatemping higher education by stringing along assorted adjuncts and other cheap labor has eroded the traditional process a bit; but it is still generally the case that 'denied tenure' = 'pursuing opportunities elsewhere is exciting and mandatory!' rather than 'you will remain an associate professor'.

2."This guy seemed to be best known for his harsh criticism of the government of Singapore... which the university depends on in many ways! Yeah, that sounds likely that they would want that guy on board." If the state of Singapore is serious about 'academic independence', then sometimes they end up cutting checks to people who say mean things about them. It's the quieter and more bookish version of not having the majority party send the minority party to the firing squad. It's a neat concept. If they aren't up to that, well, their 'universities' are pretty much stuck being fancy vocational schools and nothing more.

Re:Wait a minute (1)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | about a year and a half ago | (#43124891)

"cutting checks to people who say mean things about them"

It's a good thing that our universities here in America are so idealogically pure, they don't have that saying mean things problem as any kind of racism gets you fired quickly.

Re:Wait a minute (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43126281)

MIT gets hundreds of millions from the federal government in research grants and tuition aid. Yet, Chomsky is still there freely criticizing everything he sees fit for criticism.

I hope Slashdotters will take up this "immediately deflect to another country" tactic for everything else in the future. For example, when US corporations are fairly criticized, we get inundated with replies of "Well, it's not like Chinese companies are any better"

Only then will we see the fallacy of such an approach to debate.

Re:Wait a minute (5, Insightful)

nifty-c (113789) | about a year and a half ago | (#43123911)

Tenure is an up-or-out system. He was fired. He was not denied "a substantial promotion." You don't know what you are talking about.

Re:Wait a minute (1)

wmac1 (2478314) | about a year and a half ago | (#43124153)

and he is an associate professor and not a professor. I guess I read somewhere that he was previously promoted to associate professor level by the same university.

I don't say that he does not deserve to get the promotion (because I think he deserves that promotion), but it is not proper to fabricate and bring out things out of order (to support someone).

On a side note, I have traveled to Singapore a few times and my impression is that it is a closed and highly controlled state. It is a small island and the government has been able to implement all kinds of controls over the citizens. I guess I heard you are being tracked all the time when you drive a car (you put your card in the car which is then tracked in the whole city). Like many other countries in the region (e.g. Malaysia, Thailand), expressing political ideas and critics is a no no (specially for foreigners). I thought it is not a suitable place for long stays, the community is over-competitive, there is too much work stress and pressure, a recent law may push the cost of owning a car to $1.5 million, property prices (both rental and owning) is crazy high, the whole country is limited to an island (you reach the other end in half an hour).

Re:Wait a minute (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43128863)

I think you mean the cash card which is inserted in the car's reader.

That is used to deduct certain amounts if you drive thru certain roads during peak hours.

Called the ERP system here.

Used to make people pay to use certain roads at certain times - reduces traffic congestion that way.

Of course if you travel thru those particular roads with the gantries, it should be easy enough for the authorities to know thats where you passed thru.

Re:Wait a minute (2)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | about a year and a half ago | (#43124197)

Well for better or for worse being denied tenure IS like being fired. I mean while you're not technically fired simply because you are denied tenure, it's basically a message to get out. The only professors you generally see stay around that are not tenured, are ones that are nontenure track. Some positions, like research assistant professors, are not tenure-track. No matter how long they work, tenure is not something they will receive. However in a tenure-track position, being denied tenure is more or less a kiss of death. If the department simply isn't sure yet they'll normally extend your time, neither granting nor denying tenure. When they flat-out deny tenure, that normally means they want you gone.

Tenure is not something, at this point, that is just occasionally granted to the best professors. It is basically something assumed for most regular professorships. You either get tenure, or you go work somewhere else.

I work for university, and I have never seen a professor that was denied tenure stick around. They have all left nearly immediately afterwards. There is a reason for that. It is a convenient way to get rid of a professor that, for whatever reason, the department, college, university, whatever doesn't like.

Re:Wait a minute (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43126101)

From TFA:

Under NTU's "3+3+3+1" tenure track policy, Dr George will have to leave the university within the next year after being rejected for tenure a second time.

Source, the link under "from critics who claim political interference": http://storify.com/kuekj/denial-of-tenure-sparks-furore [storify.com]

Re:Wait a minute (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43127521)

His main research interest is in media and politics, including the political economy of journalism, censorship and alternative media

WTF?
I would have fired this parasite for trying to pass this bullshit off as scholarly.

let's move the ivy league there (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43123881)

I read the linked articles and I see that Freedom House, an NGO, says that Singapore has the same rating for political and civil freedom as Nigeria. The Economist compares the democracy in Singapore with that of Liberia. So that does beg the question... what genius sat down and said "this would be a great place to put a new campus for Yale!"

Re:let's move the ivy league there (4, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about a year and a half ago | (#43123961)

I read the linked articles and I see that Freedom House, an NGO, says that Singapore has the same rating for political and civil freedom as Nigeria. The Economist compares the democracy in Singapore with that of Liberia. So that does beg the question... what genius sat down and said "this would be a great place to put a new campus for Yale!"

'Freedom' talks, money walks. It's pretty similar to the (on the whole practically hagiographic) coverage that Dubai gets. If the GDP per-capita is high enough and most of the violence is reserved for locals who get mouthy, rather than expats who don't give a fuck because they can always just fly home, you can have pretty much any western investors, corporate branch offices, or prestige institutions you are willing to buy.

If you have the sort of unfreedom that is bad for property values(like Nigeria), then you can still get extraction industries and CIA agents; but probably not a Yale branch campus...

Re:let's move the ivy league there (1)

tqk (413719) | about a year and a half ago | (#43124265)

It's pretty similar to the (on the whole practically hagiographic) coverage that Dubai gets.

That has to be the silliest word I've seen since "orthogonal" (come on; what's wrong with "tangential", ffs?).

holy + writing [wiktionary.org] . Pretentious much? :-P

I also resent your dissing Dubai. It's one of the few shining lights in the Arab world. I wish all of Islam was as happy as Dubai.

Re:let's move the ivy league there (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about a year and a half ago | (#43124391)

As with most words, the etymology is a pretty sketchy guide to the definition. Not unrelated; but words pick up(and lose) a lot of baggage over time.

In this case 'hagiography' is the genre of writings about saints and miracles and holy places and whatnot. It also tends to carry the perjorative assertion that the writing in question is somewhere between excessively uncritical and overtly fawning in its treatment of the subject. Would there be other ways to convey the same point? Sure. Does that particular word compactly encapsulate what I wanted to say? Quite conveniently so. (I'm generally in agreement that using 'orthogonal' outside of mathematical contexts is a bit off; but it's hardly a synonym for 'tangential').

Re:let's move the ivy league there (1)

macshit (157376) | about a year and a half ago | (#43124907)

I'm generally in agreement that using 'orthogonal' outside of mathematical contexts is a bit off; but it's hardly a synonym for 'tangential'.

In a computer software context, "orthogonal" has the huge advantage that it's idiomatic. People will immediately understand your meaning... (with "tangential" they'd just go "huh?")

Most people I hear using "orthogonal" outside that context are involved in computers, so for them, it's perfectly normal.

Re:let's move the ivy league there (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about a year and a half ago | (#43128113)

Fair enough. I usually think of computer software as being a 'mathematical context'; but I suppose that it has such an enormous applied/engineering side at this point that it would be far from obvious that I meant to include software people in saying that.

Re:let's move the ivy league there (2)

ericloewe (2129490) | about a year and a half ago | (#43125069)

Tangential != Orthogonal

What's wrong with "tangential" is that its meaning is orthogonal to "orthogonal".

Re:let's move the ivy league there (1)

tqk (413719) | about a year and a half ago | (#43191683)

What's wrong with "tangential" is that its meaning is orthogonal to "orthogonal".

Among mathematicians, I'd agree. However, to the average Joe (like me):


    tangential
            adj 1: of superficial relevance if any;

    orthogonal
            adj 1: not pertinent to the matter under consideration; "an
                          issue extraneous to the debate";

those look pretty damned similar.

Re:let's move the ivy league there (2)

lxs (131946) | about a year and a half ago | (#43125259)

Just because you don't know a word doesn't automatically make the poster using it pretentious. It does make said poster more erudite than you.

Re:let's move the ivy league there (1)

interkin3tic (1469267) | about a year and a half ago | (#43124047)

I don't know, but I think education is the solution to the problems with Singapore you mentioned.

Re:let's move the ivy league there (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43124951)

Singapore is one of the best educated nations in the world.

The people is aware of the Emperor and his tactics, but choose to do nothing. The people have some kind of strange respect for the Lee Dynasty. Especially the Emperor of Singapore is deeply respected in a non constructive way.

The emperor needs to die before Singapore can rise to its full glory.

The Singaporeans need their rights to choose to stay the same. They will not revolt, but they should have their right to choose being the same by their own choice.

Re:let's move the ivy league there (1)

cffrost (885375) | about a year and a half ago | (#43124131)

I read the linked articles and I see that Freedom House, an NGO, says that Singapore has the same rating for political and civil freedom as Nigeria. The Economist compares the democracy in Singapore with that of Liberia. So that does beg the question... what genius sat down and said "this would be a great place to put a new campus for Yale!"

Consider Yale's proposal* for training US military to interrogate immigrants. [rt.com] As Singaporeans are already subject to degrading human rights conditions, [wikipedia.org] there should be little resistance from the populace should Yale decide to improve trainees' experience with interrogating natural-born Asians.

* Additional source: http://www.democracynow.org/2013/2/21/an_interrogation_center_at_yale_proposed [democracynow.org]

Re:let's move the ivy league there (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about a year and a half ago | (#43124221)

I think it's fair to say that Yale's research lead on that project, Charles Morgan III, may not be what we call a 'quick study' or a 'good learner from experience'...

His research specialty is stress and PTSD, so he has worked with the SERE program for quite a while. Back in 2007 [nytimes.com] he was oh-so-horribly-shocked to discover that we were using methods we had previously associated with the forces of commie aggression. Now, in 2013, he is seeking “someone they can’t necessarily identify with” in order to provide better practice for special forces interrogators? Is this guy the clueless optimist that keeps hopeful nigerian scammers clogging up our inboxes year after year?

Re:let's move the ivy league there (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43124307)

So when we did it to our own people it was an acceptable training technique that none of you had any problem with, but once the same techniques are used on other people its torture? Fuck that. I saw similar interrogation techniques 30 years ago when I was a SERE Agressor.

Re:let's move the ivy league there (1)

the eric conspiracy (20178) | about a year and a half ago | (#43126471)

Um the links you posted make it pretty clear that what he is training people for is NOT interrogation.

Re:let's move the ivy league there (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43124779)

Erm, because it's a city state with one of the highest GDP per capita in the world ($60K/year)? One of the least corrupt countries in the world?

Nigeria is poor ($2.5K/year), corrupt and violent. There is no valid comparison to make between the two nations.

qq moar yale (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43124225)

qq moar

Singapore is a not a free country (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43124407)

Singapore is a remnant from the time when Western countries would support any regime, provided it would not align with the USSR. There is no freedom of press, no freedom of association in Singapore. All depends of the good will of the prime minister. But since 1959, only two different prime ministers have ever been elected, and the second one is the son of the first one.

There are elections with opposing candidates, but it's also the case in Russia nowadays. As almost all media belong to the government or the prime minister's family. The election system is over-complicated to engineer a very predictable result. While a large portion of the housing is public housing, the government makes threats to remove state funding in constituencies that do note vote for the ruling party. It is said that there is no 'perception' of corruption in Singapore. On the individual level, it might be true, with upstanding public officers. But much of the country's economy is under the control of Temasek holdings, which belongs to the state, and is a pretty opaque company.

In the end you should not expect freedom if you go to work and live as an expatriate researcher in Singapore. Money, for sure. But as you're getting this money, you also are a pawn of the state to further its control of the population, and help launder the money hidden in the city by corrupt officials throughout Asia.

Re:Singapore is a not a free country (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43124691)

They've actually had 3 prime ministers since independence but the second one stepped aside for the son of the first one.

Ordinary Singaporeans are terrified of their government to a degree that isn't found in many countries. They're convinced that one stray comment could see them punished for the rest of their lives.

The fear of the government is declining as the government's unpopularity with the younger generation is increasing but it's hard to imagine any transfer of power to the opposition.

Re:Singapore is a not a free country (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43124963)

I felt the same when I lived in Singapore. It took my a while to get used to the fear, the fake honour, and the lies.

It such a great place that could be so much more. I hope the old Emperor dies as soon as possible. He did a great job, but his time has past.

Re:Singapore is a not a free country (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43124735)

That's actually the true meaning of the term "3rd World countrty" . . . 1st world refers to capitalist democracies, 2nd world communist countries and 3rd world is non-aligned. At the time the term was coined these countries hadn't achieved a high human development index (standard of living). Singapore, despite some lack of freedom, now has. It's still according to the original definition a 3rd world country. . . . I live across in the 'newly industrialed' nation of the Philippines.

Re:Singapore is a not a free country (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43125263)

s/true/old/

OMG Asian countries have censorship (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43124799)

........Or maybe you shouldn't listen to whatever censorship USA is telling you!
Get a clue

The Lee dynasty of Singapore. The Emperor is old. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43124931)

The age of Fidel Castro, Saddam Hussein, Lee Kuan Yew, Muammar Gaddafi, Suharto, and the other cold war dictators is near the end. May the Singapore get the democracy and freedom they deserve. Their right to choose to be the same, but by their own choice.

Singapore is probably the country in the world that is most ready for a democracy. It is still being run by cold war tactics by a old cold war veteran of the league of the great titans of global leadership. A great old man that failed. The Emperor runs his country like so many other of the old cold war dictators.

I would probably have voted for Lee Hsien Loong as a leader. But he should get the change to win as a true open candidate instead of being the son of the Emperor.

Singapore have everything they need for a brilliant society, but it seems like they have to wait for the Emperor to die. The Emperor of Singapore has done a descent job. He has excelled in too many areas to mention. But he failed to finish the job. He build a model society in so many ways, but he has kept using the old cold war tactics long after the need was long gone.

Is it the Asian respect for the elders that keep the Singaporeans from pushing the Emperor down? I might have voted for his son as the leader of Singapore, but not as a Emperor.

Singapore is one of the countries I like the most, but the Emperor and his family makes it hard to be honest. Singapore is a country of lies and fake honour. But very close to be so much more. I enjoyed my life in Singapore, but I could not respect the lies.

hold your horses. (1)

ikejam (821818) | about a year and a half ago | (#43125267)

Woah.. lets not go on to full Singapore bashing mode .. the country (city-state) has achieved some incredible things.. not least of which is continued economic prosperity amidst the carnarge, as well as an incredibly safe, stable and clean living habitat for the populace. Ofcourse there are gripes, freedom of speech does not stand up to the western definition of it..but atleast they are pretty honest about it. The city and its government has punched far above its weight. I think it would only be fair to analyse the state of affairs in that context.

Re:hold your horses. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43125637)

It is a well functioning dictatorship, but the Lee Dynasty is a leftover from the cold war.

Singapore has the education, money, and system to become one of the best democratic countries in the world. The law in Singapore is not the same for all the people. It is closer to being so than most countries on this planet, but one family is above the law.

Re:hold your horses. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43125675)

Given the strict control of the press, how can you tell if it's "safe, stable, and clean living" for most of the populace?

Re:hold your horses. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43126747)

The Singaporean media are a OK news source for the region, but not for Singapore.

Singapore is small and physically relatively open. Most areas outside the military camps are accessible for regular people. Walked and travelled around most of the country both in the night and during day time. It is mostly clean, tidy, safe, and so on. But there are clear problems that few people mentions.

Singapore is a city of trading. Trading attracts both positive and negative aspects of society. They also have many of the same problems we have in the west. It is in many ways comparable to modern western cities.

There are problems related to human trafficking, weapons trade, organized crime, pollution from the shipping industry, pollution from burning in Indonesia, and much more.

But you are right. Most people in Singapore is not trained to think critically about their own surroundings. They are not encouraged to look for problems. They do not know their own city.

Re:hold your horses. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43126479)

So you're saying people on Slashdot who criticize the US despite it's advances over the decades in civil rights, environmental regulations, and tremendous growth in welfare for the poor, are wrong to do so? What does "punching above it's weight" really mean? I recall that whenever China is criticized, it's large population is claimed as an impediment and should mitigate any criticisms, now here we see another claim that small population is an impediment and should mitigate any criticisms. Which is it?

Reminds me a few years ago (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43125325)

when a grouo pf recruiters from Singapore came to our campus to look post-docs to work at their then new A-star research hub. After their talk, a uni mate came up to one of them and asked them about working there. He must have poked fun on purpose because I overheard the recruitment lady explicitly saying its all fine as long as you don't talk about the politics.

Singapore a Guided Democracy (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43125327)

Singapore is what is called "guided democracy(GD)". A simple way of effectively saying "do it my way or the highway". However this guided democracy has achieved enormous success and results for the last few decades taking a tiny country and putting it at the forefront of Asia as a pro business centre. It is highly likely that without being a GD then we would be looking at a very different and MUCH poorer country right now. Singapore has no mineral or natural wealth to fall back on, so was their approach wrong? That said when a "Western" University chooses to partner with Singapore and establish an adjunct there they know exactly what political arena they are entering and they deliberately make an informed decision. Additionally it is accepted in Singapore that if you openly and often criticise the ruling Peoples Action Party(PAP) you WILL eventually feel their "wrath" in some way. Thus an Associate Professor at a government University, under these circumstances, quite possibly will not achieve tenure if he is overactive in his criticism of the PAP and their methods. He knew of this likelyhood upfront. Should a Western University now change course as a result of this event? Probably not as Singapore is "changing". The PAP maintained a decent majority at the last election, but the overall 's popularity has been deminishing slightly as voters begin to seek a more open way forward and recent local elections have stunned the PAP in this regard .For a Western University to reconsider their approach to Singapore in view of this and at this time is probably not useful and would be unnecessary. Singapore is now a hugely successful country which rewards the prosperous (low taxation, no capital gains) but it has become an extremely expensive place to live as inflation is HIGH and property prices are now EXTREME. If you are not prosperous you are allowed to purchase Housing Development Board (HDB) flats (apartments) which cost usually under one million Singapore dollars (yes that's inexpensive ,very inexpensive relative to private property in Singapore) but the occupants often have a long (45+ minutes) communte to work. That may not sound an inconvenience to non Singaporeans but is considered a lengthy commute by Singapore standards. But is has created a visible example of the large gap between the haves and have nots in the country. Just like China vast amounts of private properties have been puchased and remain empty as the owners expect a rich reward in terms of rising prices EVERY year and see NO downside. Just drive by residential skyscrapers at night and look for those apartment blocks with few lights on! This is a visible rendition of the extreme residential property inflation/speculative game in Singapore. With all the success in Singapore there is now a dichotomy of a potential decision amongst the population. Should Singapore continue with the guided democracy because "it has worked so well", or is now the time to choose a more open democratic governance and take the risks that this brings, in return for a more open society where criticism is accepted as benefitial. It's their country. They will decide.

Re:Singapore a Guided Democracy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43125703)

I used to live in Singapore.

The Singaporeans would probably re-elect their current leader if they had a real actual choice. The Lee family has done a good job in most areas, and even great in others. But the people of Singapore should be given the right to choose the Lee family by them self.

I am less sure that the people would have chosen the same level of surveillance and censorship as they have today. They taxi drivers are funny. They complain all the time about their living condition and their lack of freedom.

From wikipedia:
"The government in Singapore has broad powers to limit citizens' rights and to inhibit political opposition.[1] In 2009, Singapore was ranked 133rd out of 175 nations by Reporters Without Borders in the Worldwide Press Freedom Index. Freedom in the World 2006 ranked Singapore 5 out of 7 for political freedom, and 4 out of 7 for civil liberties (where 1 is the most free), with an overall ranking of "partly free"."

Life, get over it. Everyone gets fucked over (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43127585)

It is only news when it is someone in the public light.

Cherian George = douchebag? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43127673)

This guy claims to have a hate on for Singapore, but he's clinging by the skin of his teeth to hang around this repressive regime?

Since he's so loved by his supporters, perhaps his alma mater Stanford, Columbia, or Cambridge can offer this douchebag a tenure position.
Hey supporters, put your money where your mouth is.

Advice for Original Poster (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43127709)

This post didn't get many responses. This was obviously written to get a reaction and deservedly so, but what you are trying to say isn't clear. You are trying to cram too much into long sentences so. Write shorter punchier questions and to start debate you need to end with a clear question.

tenure denied (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43127721)

I've never met this guy, but perhaps it's as simple as some serious personal hygiene problems like bad curry body odor.
And who wants that in the faculty meetings.

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