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MIT President Tells Grads To 'Hack the World'

timothy posted about a year ago | from the but-gently dept.

Education 86

theodp writes "On Friday, MIT President L. Rafael Reif exhorted grads to 'hack the world until you make the world a little more like MIT'. A rather ironic choice of words, since 'hack the world' is precisely what others said Aaron Swartz was trying to do in his fateful run-in with MIT. President Reif presumably received an 'Incomplete' this semester for the promised time-is-of-the-essence review of MIT's involvement in the events that preceded Swartz's suicide last January. By the way, it wasn't so long ago that 2013 commencement speaker Drew Houston and Aaron Swartz were both welcome speakers at MIT."

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sounds familiar... (3, Insightful)

Tastecicles (1153671) | about a year ago | (#43948275)

...Line from "Hackers", repeated several times:

"Hack the planet!"

Re:sounds familiar... (2)

Eightbitgnosis (1571875) | about a year ago | (#43948295)

They're TRASHING our rights, man! They're TRASHING the flow of data! They're TRASHING! TRASHING! TRASHING!

Same Color, Same Smell!! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43948369)

They're TRASHING our rights, man! They're TRASHING the flow of data! They're TRASHING! TRASHING! TRASHING!

You know what's great about fucking a black woman? If she forgets to wipe her ass, you can't tell!

Re:sounds familiar... (1)

fustakrakich (1673220) | about a year ago | (#43948747)

You sound like my hard drive. Time to buy more RAM?

Re:sounds familiar... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43954845)

That (the "trashing") is also a quote from Hackers.

Re:sounds familiar... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43948395)

what a nice, polite and subtle tribute so such grim events.

Re:sounds familiar... (1)

Steve_Ussler (2941703) | about a year ago | (#43949429)

I think he loved that movie :) But MIT hackers are real...the movie was a sham.

Re:sounds familiar... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43949909)

totally.

No chick hacker looks anything like Angelina Jolie.

Re:sounds familiar... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43950385)

Actually - some female hackers look better than Jolie. The problem is yours - you spent so much of your youth watching the television, and being indoctrinated to prefer women who look like Jolie. Those of us who aren't totally indoctrinated prefer real women, who aren't draped in (tens?) thousands of dollars worth of designer clothes, hundreds of dollars worth of make up, carefully airbrushed in every image, blah, blah, blah.

You want Jolie? Go get her. Personally, I wouldn't follow her around the corner to get a better look at her.

Re:sounds familiar... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43950703)

No chick hacker looks anything like Angelina Jolie.

What? Flat chested?

(Too soon?)

Hack The World! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43948305)

I want to get off!

really sad, rip Aaron (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43948317)

to today's youth, please always look critically at what the "adults" are doing, they've often quite wrong

Re:really sad, rip Aaron (1)

couchslug (175151) | about a year ago | (#43948651)

Don't rust anyone over 30.

Re:really sad, rip Aaron (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43948703)

There are plenty of people to trust over 30; developing critical thinking skills and examining what the "old folks" are telling you is paramount though.

Re:really sad, rip Aaron (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43949605)

I'm nearly forty and I'll say this: don't trust anyone or anything including ideals and ideas. Nothing will ever live up to your trust.

Trust is as empty a word as love. You might at best think you know when you trust or love someone else (and possibly be wrong) but nothing else. They are one-directional and therefore mostly meaningless words that people subconsciously or consciously cling to to avoid reality.

That said it might well be a good decision to avoid reality, otherwise you'll become like me.

Re:all is lost, all a sham (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43952231)

I'm nearly forty and I'll say this: don't trust anyone or anything including ideals and ideas. Nothing will ever live up to your trust.

Trust is as empty a word as love. You might at best think you know when you trust or love someone else (and possibly be wrong) but nothing else. They are one-directional and therefore mostly meaningless words that people subconsciously or consciously cling to to avoid reality.

That said it might well be a good decision to avoid reality, otherwise you'll become like me.

Why do you post anything on /. then? If you believed as you say you wouldn't bother posting, try Plato.

Go on, kids, hack the world! (5, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about a year ago | (#43948321)

Go ahead and hack the world. If you get caught, I never said that and we've never heard of you.

Re:Go on, kids, hack the world! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43948413)

Go ahead and hack the world. If you get caught, I never said that and we've never heard of you.

1. The word 'hack' has several meanings. Maybe you picked the wrong one.

2. We have good relations with the well known law school up the river. However Prof. Lessig is very busy, I'm afraid.

3. Couldn't you settle for disrupting the Harvard-Yale football game?

4. Or the kind of hacking that leads to an IPO, so you can live a life of luxury and MIT can hit you up to fund some new research labs.

Pesky Kids (4, Funny)

sanman2 (928866) | about a year ago | (#43948439)

... I would've gotten away with it too, if it weren't for those pesky kids!

fir5t post (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43948325)

its3lf. You7 can't

Thedp is the Worst Submitter Ever (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43948327)

Can we get submissions without thedp's snide, inane and uninsightful comments thrown in? He is the worst with slipping in his own commentary as well as a million useless and irrelevant links in the story.

Ban theodp and fire timothy, I say.

Re:Thedp is the Worst Submitter Ever (0)

Samantha Wright (1324923) | about a year ago | (#43948347)

That would be too ironic to happen.

Re:Thedp is the Worst Submitter Ever (1)

fustakrakich (1673220) | about a year ago | (#43948749)

Irony is dead...

Re:Thedp is the Worst Submitter Ever (0)

Samantha Wright (1324923) | about a year ago | (#43949033)

It sure is. Isn't that ironic? (Alanis Morissette in 3, 2...)

Re:Thedp is the Worst Submitter Ever (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43948479)

Actually I thought the summary was balanced in the sense that you can't really fault it whether you agreed or disagreed with what Swartz did, except to say that it should've tilted more towards your POV.

A million useless and irrelevant links? Hardly. He just brought up the Swartz case, which I'm sure was on many of the attendees' minds.

Re:Thedp is the Worst Submitter Ever (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43948555)

But I can fault it. Watch: "It's full of bias and doesn't really provide any new information, which is because the 'story' it's reporting is nothing more than an excuse for an armchair advocate to post his bookmark selection again." There. I just faulted it. The problem is that there is nothing newsworthy about this. The guy made a commencement address that is, when you look at it, nothing more than inspirational fluff that doesn't represent a sane viewpoint in today's world, just like every other commencement address ever. There is no need for this to be a story at all.

Re:Thedp is the Worst Submitter Ever (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43948607)

What Reif said was not news, but it's a gathering of the clan, like a wedding or a funeral, and it occurred while the Swartz case is still being actively discussed. As you noted, it's a chance for people to post about MIT and Swartz, or both together.

If anyone wants to post some cool Lisp code, here's their chance.

Huh... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43948357)

So can this guy share some blame when the law comes knocking?

Cuz "hack the world" didn't work out so well for Aaron Swartz...

Re:Huh... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43948879)

He is probably using a definition of "hack" that doesn't involve breaking into storage closets.

Hack the World except... (2)

Virtucon (127420) | about a year ago | (#43948363)

For our materials that are paid for by US tax dollars and put behind systems to deliberately make you get at it through our multiple gates and measures or any other thing we make money on.

Hack the world, but not WOW (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43948391)

Hack the world, but not the World of Warcraft. Video game hackers make it so making video games is more challenging(some cool games are impossible to make because they'll be ruined by hackers), and it costs more to hire game masters to ban cheaters. When the game is competitive, cheaters detract from the fun of the game.

Make the world a place for rich loyal kids (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43948441)

I think you misunderstood "more like MIT". The Massachusetts Institute of Technology is a deeply traditional institution, not some revolutionary place. People go there to change the odds in their favor, not to make the world a better place.

MIT Hacks (5, Informative)

e4liberty (537089) | about a year ago | (#43948449)

At MIT, the word "hack" means something very specific, and not criminal or unethical. It is a impressive, creative, and clever achievement. From http://hacks.mit.edu/ [mit.edu] The word hack at MIT usually refers to a clever, benign, and "ethical" prank or practical joke, which is both challenging for the perpetrators and amusing to the MIT community (and sometimes even the rest of the world!). Note that this has nothing to do with computer (or phone) hacking (which we call "cracking").

Re:MIT Hacks (0, Troll)

darkfeline (1890882) | about a year ago | (#43948507)

Do you seriously think just because a prank or practical joke is "clever", "benign", or even "ethical", that it isn't criminal? People have been thrown in jail for worse.

Re:MIT Hacks (1)

darkfeline (1890882) | about a year ago | (#43948513)

Substitute "less" for "worse". I wasn't thinking properly, that's how much parent post's lack of thought angered me.

Re:MIT Hacks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43948603)

Do you seriously think just because a prank or practical joke is "clever", "benign", or even "ethical", that it isn't criminal? People have been thrown in jail for worse.

OP is just explaining MIT culture. You're welcome to keep your own culture (which seems to be super serious and stodgy)

Re:MIT Hacks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43948641)

We've seen MIT culture on display with Aaron

lol, the captcha is "collar"

Re:MIT Hacks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43949821)

The fact that people think this is something specific to MIT really shows how the press and hollywood has corrupted a title that was once a badge of honor, and it'll never be so again.

Re:MIT Hacks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43950187)

I disagree. When you see people using the word appropriately you can be pretty confident there's a good chance of them being interesting in some way or another, and I find that useful. The hacker culture won't ever be pop culture.

Re:MIT Hacks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43948673)

Fucking ignorant people everywhere...

Re:MIT Hacks (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43950415)

Yes, they have. Most MIT "hackers" are very respectful of property and equipment, we just like to play with it.

For example: when visiting various MIT buildings and roofs somewhat illicitly one evening, we noticed that some very clumsy fools had damaged the lock leading to one of the MIT rooftops. The next week, we showed up with tools and parts and repaired the lock, so that there was no sign of damage.

MIT authorities, in turn, treated our hacks fairly kindly. When we turned the "assembled underwater to practice space manufacture" cube hanging in the lobby of MIT's main entrance into a six-sided die late one night, we took much longer than planned. And when we scurried off for a celebratory drink at the allnight coffeehouse, someone realized they'd left the blueprints in the lobby. When they retrieved the blueprints, it was apparent the campus police had found them and had previously been leaving us alone while we worked, because they had an added signature from the head of the head of campus police.

We were *very* careful about hacking. The points of good hacks were technological accomplishment, and *surprise*, not theft or destruction. A hack that left someone glad you'd done it was considered ideal, such as the police car or telephone booths on the Great Dome.

Re:MIT Hacks (1)

darkfeline (1890882) | about a year ago | (#43979025)

Yes. I know all of this. But if you, say, reconstructed a police car on a building outside of MIT, I doubt you'll find the authorities there as accomodating of your technological accomplishments as you'd like. So go "hack the world". Even if you leave no damage and put everything back where it was, you may just find an arrest warrant out for your name.

People are commonly called out for finding exploits and security vulnerabilities. Do you honestly think a practical joke would get away unpunished? It's awesome that MIT promotes this kind of culture, but it's best to keep reality in mind, especially for new graduates.

Re:MIT Hacks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43948705)

I'm pretty sure we've already been hacked then. Multi-billion dollar companies based on web search and swapping pictures of cats? If that isn't a prank I don't know what is. Whether or not it's ethical is up for debate though.

Re:MIT Hacks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43949275)

Phone hacking is called cracking at MIT? Where did Phreaking go?

Re:MIT Hacks (1)

cbhacking (979169) | about a year ago | (#43951013)

I believe he meant phone as in smartphone (or tablet). I hack my phone, and occasionally hack *on* my phone, all the time, in the MIT sense. Phreaking is entirely different; that's hacking the phone system.

Re:MIT Hacks (3, Insightful)

divisionbyzero (300681) | about a year ago | (#43949557)

At MIT, the word "hack" means something very specific, and not criminal or unethical. It is a impressive, creative, and clever achievement.

From http://hacks.mit.edu/ [mit.edu]

The word hack at MIT usually refers to a clever, benign, and "ethical" prank or practical joke, which is both challenging for the perpetrators and amusing to the MIT community (and sometimes even the rest of the world!). Note that this has nothing to do with computer (or phone) hacking (which we call "cracking").

So, the president of MIT was urging MIT students to pull clever practical jokes? That's stupid or he meant something different. Presumably he meant "hack" in the same way that people who have been actually involved with computers understand it: exploring the possibilities of a system (often including some that the inventor never intended) for the sake of discovery and in some cases using those discoveries to create unique and innovative outcomes. I get that you are trying to make a distinction between "hacking" and "cracking" but "hacking" has a meaning that transcends the special case of practical jokes that are a part of MIT folklore and if the president of MIT did not have the broader meaning in mind, then his comments are almost comical.

Re:MIT Hacks (1, Informative)

AthanasiusKircher (1333179) | about a year ago | (#43949819)

So, the president of MIT was urging MIT students to pull clever practical jokes?

Umm, no.

That's stupid or he meant something different. Presumably he meant "hack" in the same way that people who have been actually involved with computers understand it: exploring the possibilities of a system (often including some that the inventor never intended) for the sake of discovery and in some cases using those discoveries to create unique and innovative outcomes.

Yep. That's actually what it means at MIT too, except the origin isn't necessarily only in computers. A "hacker" at MIT is one who explores in general -- often finding ways into the deep tunnels of the sub-basements in campus buildings or on the roofs and domes, seeking what goes on in the bowels and secret places of MIT.

The famous "hacks" at MIT are merely a side-effect of that exploring culture. It's only because hackers have such intimate knowledge of the buildings and systems on campus that they could manage to put a police car on the great dome, etc.

At MIT, "hacking" has the exact connotation of positive exploration that you describe. On the other hand, when the term became known to a wider culture at a point where computers were still mysterious and somewhat scary, a "hacker" was seen primarily in a negative light -- someone who knew "too much" about things he wasn't "supposed to."

So, the broader culture saw hackers as criminals. Technically, at MIT, they are too. (Last time I heard, students get fined if found on the roofs of buildings, for example.) But the cardinal rule of the MIT movement is non-destructive exploration for the sake of knowledge.

That's what the MIT president was talking about.

Re:MIT Hacks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43953205)

But the cardinal rule of the MIT movement is non-destructive exploration for the sake of knowledge.

This is laughably ironic. I have no respect for MIT anymore.

Re:MIT Hacks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43958055)

>ironic
Your definition of irony is laughably lronic.

Re:MIT Hacks (2)

VortexCortex (1117377) | about a year ago | (#43949753)

You don't get to define hack. Culture does. Don't get me wrong. I'm a hacker in the original classic sense. However, Science, or even just Progress is about compression. Compression is the ability to Sense observation Decide the likely outcome based on prior observation, and Act with predictive powers given by the prior observation. If you and I have different dictionaries, we have less progress; More wasted time building a conversion table, clarifying the symbolics of communication. When faced with a more broadly adopted definition it is not only foolish, but against progress to not adopt the new meaning.

TL;DR: The media Hacked your term for Hacking. Call yourself a Hacker and you'll be rightly considered a Hack.

Re:MIT Hacks (2)

AthanasiusKircher (1333179) | about a year ago | (#43950163)

You don't get to define hack. Culture does.

Absolutely. MIT doesn't get to define "hack" for the culture at large. However, MIT does have its own distinctive culture, and it has its own sets of terms, phrases, and special meanings (just like Slashdot).

MIT does get to define what the term "hack" means when used on its own campus, as long as its own communal culture agrees on it.

And thus, when an MIT president speaks to MIT students, he might be expected to use the term "hack" in that sense. There is nothing inherently "wrong" with this, nor is there anything wrong with someone trying to explain this distinctive culture and terminology to others... others can then freely choose whether or not this unusual meaning is of any use to them or not.

This, by the way, is exactly how meanings of words evolve over time. If everyone always used words in the same way, word meanings would never change. History shows they do. That's a fact of life.

If you and I have different dictionaries, we have less progress; More wasted time building a conversion table, clarifying the symbolics of communication.

Anyone who has spent time trying to translate something with subtle meaning from one language to another realizes that each language has a distinctive set of circumscribed and interconnecting meanings that are difficult to render in another language. In essence, different languages actually can produce different ideas and different knowledge, just because of the way words connect to each other.

There are certainly benefits to a universal standard for communication. But there are also benefits from letting smaller groups develop their own distinctive cultures and even distinctive languages, because by doing so, they may end up making connections, distinctions,and even discoveries not possible (or at least unlikely) in another language.

Re:MIT Hacks (1)

gstoddart (321705) | about a year ago | (#43963717)

Absolutely. MIT doesn't get to define "hack" for the culture at large.

No, but the term hacking was in use for a very long time before everyone came along and decided cracker was a better word.

Many of us are old enough to remember the term applying to both, and listening to the whining about how it's supposed to be crack instead of hack gets an eye roll, because those people weren't around when 'hack' covered a lot more.

MIT doesn't get to define the word, but people who are trying to retroactively re-define it are also missing the point.

Re:MIT Hacks (1)

DaTrueDave (992134) | about a year ago | (#43952035)

Hmmm... What do you suppose someone thinks of a "lifehacker", someone who visits and applies the advice given at the immensely popular website http://www.lifehacker.com [lifehacker.com] ?

I think the word "hacker" means different things in different contexts, and just because one definition is used less doesn't mean it no longer exists, or that it holds up progress.

Re:MIT Hacks (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43951289)

The word hack at MIT usually refers to a clever, benign, and "ethical" prank or practical joke, which is both challenging for the perpetrators and amusing to the MIT community (and sometimes even the rest of the world!). Note that this has nothing to do with computer (or phone) hacking (which we call "cracking").

...implying there is no such thing as ethical computer/phone hacking. The way I see it, Aaron's actions CAN be seen as ethical (although possibly illegal) "hacking". After all, he was "hacking" to liberate public domain works to the larger public, which CAN be seen as ethical (although possibly illegal).

tl;dr: MIT's President should stfu about "hacking".

Re:MIT Hacks (1)

Trip6 (1184883) | about a year ago | (#43951717)

Can you "hack" a "Smoot?"

Re:MIT Hacks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43952959)

This was the original meaning of hacking, take from a 50 year old who was there when it first started being used in the phreaking/computer communities, though "Ethical" was not necessary for it to be a good hack.

Re:MIT Hacks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43954163)

To be precise, phone hacking is referred to as phreaking.

Re:MIT Hacks (1)

gstoddart (321705) | about a year ago | (#43963665)

And to many of us, that's why we still use the word 'hack' in both the making something cool category and 'hacking' into a system.

To me, this insistence on using the word 'cracker' came about a decade too late -- because 'hack' was used for both for a long time, and then a bunch of people starting whining and saying it should be 'cracking'.

For me it will always be hacking code and hacking into a system.

The best advice.... (1)

David_Hart (1184661) | about a year ago | (#43948461)

I still think that the best advice I've ever heard/read at any commencement advice is.... to wear sunscreen...

Baz Luhrmann - Everybody's Free To Wear Sunscreen
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sTJ7AzBIJoI [youtube.com]

Wow, Slashdot has changed (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43948485)

Used to be, people would circlejerk over hacking vs. cracking. Based on the responses to this article, it seems like most people here don't even know the difference anymore.

Re:Wow, Slashdot has changed (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43948549)

Reif used "hacking" correctly in accordance to Slashdotters' strict definitions, but since MIT is bad the usage of this word has to be turned against them, even if that requires temporarily accepting the despised definition of "hacking"

Re:Wow, Slashdot has changed (1)

superwiz (655733) | about a year ago | (#43948683)

Well, even in software development hacking doesn't mean a clever solution, anymore. Most people writing software are not that clever. What they call a hack is usually a kludge... And cutting corners will often save 20 minutes and waste a month down the line. So, in all fairness, these "hacks" do more damage than the "crackers."

kludge (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43953409)

kludge = foreign temporary worker definition of english NON foreign temporary worker word cause the foreign temporary worker is bent over taking it from a min wage cooperate job

Re:Wow, Slashdot has changed (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43949535)

Everyone must stop forgiving assholes for the shit they do, they will only do more of it. Plug theirs and shit on them for a change.

MIT has become a worse "word" than cracking in case you didn't know. Fuck them. Fuck Reif. They will not be forgiven by the very people who know the difference and who know perfectly well that the old MIT was famous for hacks. They should not be forgiven even if those same people work or study at MIT.

Hack the World... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43948499)

...and get thrown in a cage for the rest of your life.

MIT Forever Changed (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43948501)

Prior to the incident with Aaron Schwartz and how it was handled by MIT, I associated nothing negative with MIT. MIT was all about higher technology learning and legendary hacks. I am saddened that MIT now conjures strong negative as well as strong positive thoughts with regards to some of the core activities that one associates with a computing career choice and lifestyle.

Re:MIT Forever Changed (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43948771)

argh.. I'm an idiot - my apologies for the "ch". It's Swartz. Swartz. Swartz. Swartz. Swartz. Swartz.

Idiotic summary (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43948617)

This summary is idiotic. At MIT, hacking doesn't mean computer hacking - it means doing something cool. Also, MIT is the one place where everyone (except certain parts of the admin) supports Aaron Swartz and *wouldn't* want him to be punished

I assume hte OP doen't have royalty income (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43948637)

cause if he did, he might see what Swartz did as therft that works to the detriment of hundreds, if not thousands of people, many of them penurious academics in foreign countries for whom Jstore royalty checks were a life line
but to heck with those poor retired writers, poets and professors - surely , as they eat dogfood, they can appreciate the grandeur of a dot com millionair liberating their work ?

swartz was a spoiled rich kid who didn' think thru, in any real sense, the implications of what he was doing
that people see him as a hero is just wierd

snide comment is dumb (1)

superwiz (655733) | about a year ago | (#43948667)

There is a difference between not living up to ones own standards and not having standards. Setting a good goal for yourself and telling others that this goal is good doesn't always preclude one from being weak and failing to live up to ones own expectations.

Re:snide comment is dumb (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43949399)

There is a difference between being a criminal or terrorist or anything else with money and good social standing and the right connections or to not have any of those.

Fixed that for you, now you can continue to be an apologist for hypocritical tyranny but at least you'll be clear and concise about it.

If you have any objections I have to point out that I merely hacked your post through a informal diff posted as a comment.

Hack the world? If you do to the hypocrites what they do to others they would be dead/killed.

MIT: Have you no sense of shame (1, Troll)

Mister Liberty (769145) | about a year ago | (#43948689)

Aaron Schwarz would roll over in his grave.

Re:MIT: Have you no sense of shame (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43949609)

Durr, the MIT meaning of hack is the true meaning of hack. RMS' meaning of hack. Aaron was just a malcontent, his ilk has hijacked hacker culture.

fuck off (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43955191)

MIT doesn't have a trademark on the term

MIT !=reality (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43949207)

'hack the world until you make the world a little more like MIT'.

You mean an environment that is shielded from market forces? That has been tried and it has been failing with apocalyptic consequences. You know, SOCIALISM. Don't try to say that it was never properly implemented because human nature won't allow it to work. You can murder significant fractions of the population to cower the rest to cooperate, but it stilll won't work. The ambitious will either flee or join the bureaucracy.

--
Another fine opinion from The Fucking Psychopath® .

I fail to see... (2)

amightywind (691887) | about a year ago | (#43949233)

'hack the world until you make the world a little more like MIT'

I fail to see how pocket protector wearing nerds make the world better.

Hypocrite (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43949317)

And plagiarist.

Watchlist (1)

Reliable Windmill (2932227) | about a year ago | (#43951389)

He's now on every singe watchlist there is.

The new sports on slashdot: (1)

drolli (522659) | about a year ago | (#43951591)

How quickly can we connect the Aaron Schwarz case as quickly as possible without sign of reflection to a random factoid?

While i certainly dont appreciate the possible punishment for copying files, what he did was *not* hacking. Hacking is ti exploit unexpected, new paths. Attaching a computer to a netwerk and copying files for releasing them, unrelated to demonstrating a new way of exploiting something is *not* hacking

At least spell his name correctly (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43952257)

More like, take a famous and highly illustrative case of someone "hacking the world" who then gets murdered by society, a society that sees fit to encourage its own "golden bunch" to enjoy liberties not available to the rest of us.

I'm sure you'll see this as hyperbole and say he killed himself. In a moment of clarity, he perhaps realized exactly the nature of reality. That a society that sees fit to excessively punish someone with good intentions, no real damage done, and an opportunity to punish him at appropriate level would instead go way overboard just because it can... Well I wish he had realized that he could make it through this and he and society could come out better...

And he was hacking the the original sense, which doesn't mean doing whatever you feel like regardless of the ethical implications, but exploring and expanding perhaps especially because of the ethical implications

lol, captcha is "flagrant"

Re:The new sports on slashdot: (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43952865)

How quickly can we connect the Aaron Schwarz [sic] case as quickly as possible without sign of reflection to a random factoid?

But you'll take the opportunity to download your thoughts on the Swartz case anyway.

Re:The new sports on slashdot: (1)

drolli (522659) | about a year ago | (#43953199)

no. i downloaded my thoughts on the article and the representation of the case in the media.

Not everything assumed to be a crime related to computers qualifies as "hacking"

Not everybody whom i would count as a hacker does only "Hacks"

Not every head of an institution with many departments and different interests bound by some contracts must/can represent the facet in which a certain part of people looks at it in a specific way without being forbidden to use a specific word afterwards.

I appeciate that the word "Hacking" will be more positivly used in public by such aa prominent use of the word in its original meaning. This is good news. If people shakingahands with politicians give us back the original meaning, its good in my book. As a scientist "Hacking the world" is the best formulation of what i should aim to do; not just understanding things but constantly look around where assumptions of what cant work are not valid.

now 500 kids went and bought machettes (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43953393)

now 500 kids went and bought machettes...they were last seen hacking up everything in ther epath cause they cant quite make anything look like MIT.

other colleges started big Tech companies (1)

peter303 (12292) | about a year ago | (#43954017)

Harvard dropouts started MicroSoft and Facebook. Stanford/grads dropouts started CISCO, Yahoo, Google, HP ... I dont see MIT with an "elephant" for all its bravado.

Re:other colleges started big Tech companies (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43959231)

Stark Industries.

Hack doesn't mean "break into" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43960689)

I must be old. "Hack" has never meant to break into or "crack" if you will. Hacking is to modify something to make it do something it was never intended to do. Usually something pretty neat or innovative.

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