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NSA Infected 50,000 Computer Networks With Malicious Software

Unknown Lamer posted 1 year,25 days | from the pretty-sure-that's-illegal dept.

Privacy 264

rtoz writes "The American intelligence service — NSA — infected more than 50,000 computer networks worldwide with malicious software designed to steal sensitive information, documents provided by former NSA-employee Edward Snowden show."

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Belgium is a NATO member (4, Insightful)

Beryllium Sphere(tm) (193358) | 1 year,25 days | (#45503567)

The NSA was conducting a military operation against an ally.

Re:Belgium is a NATO member (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45503597)

Nice observation there. What country doesn't spy on allies? Are you that naive?

Re:Belgium is a NATO member (2, Insightful)

NettiWelho (1147351) | 1 year,25 days | (#45503619)

Nice observation there. What country doesn't spy on allies? Are you that naive?

AFAIK it is illegal for Finnish government agents to stage hostile operations inside foreign nations.

Related [youtube.com]

Re:Belgium is a NATO member (-1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45503687)

AFAIK it is illegal for Finnish government agents to stage hostile operations inside foreign nations.

For contrast, Finland has a population significantly smaller than New York City.

Re:Belgium is a NATO member (5, Informative)

Angeret (1134311) | 1 year,25 days | (#45503763)

Didn't stop them from scaring seven shades of shit out of the Russians before, during and after WWII though.

Re:Belgium is a NATO member (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45503909)

New Yorkers do that to people all the time.

Re:Belgium is a NATO member (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45504085)

New Yorkers are all talk.

Re:Belgium is a NATO member (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45504135)

New Yorkers are all talk.

that's why they never shut up. new york and new jersey and detroit can all go to hell really.

Re:Belgium is a NATO member (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45504235)

Some of them smell too.

Re:Belgium is a NATO member (-1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45504121)

New Yorkers do that to people all the time.

Yeah, we call it "Tuesday".

Re:Belgium is a NATO member (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45504493)

New Yorkers do that to people all the time.

And now you know why we picked an island to call New York.

So we could keep them with their own kind.

The U.S. government is EXTREMELY corrupt. (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45504273)

The U.S. government is EXTREMELY corrupt, and the response of U.S. citizens is to make foolish jokes.

Re:Belgium is a NATO member (4, Informative)

NettiWelho (1147351) | 1 year,25 days | (#45503813)

For contrast, Finland has a population significantly smaller than New York City.

And the original question was "What country doesn't spy on allies?"

Re:Belgium is a NATO member (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45503827)

And the point is -- does it matter what is illegal for the Finnish government to do inside foreign nations, when that's basically like envisioning Queens and Brooklyn invading Jersey?

Re:Belgium is a NATO member (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45503855)

Yes it does matter that some countries do have moral standards. Unlike, as displayed by the article, USA and UK.

Re:Belgium is a NATO member (4, Insightful)

ColdWetDog (752185) | 1 year,25 days | (#45504467)

That's what the other countries want you to think.

Countries don't really have moral standards. Just budgets.

Re:Belgium is a NATO member (2)

NettiWelho (1147351) | 1 year,25 days | (#45503861)

And the point is -- does it matter what is illegal for the Finnish government to do inside foreign nations, when that's basically like envisioning Queens and Brooklyn invading Jersey?

Well, Finland is bordering a nation with largest landmass in the world whose population has historically posed an existential risk to Finns with wars fought on the most centuries since pre-800 AD. It is in the interest of self-preservation to know what your neighbour has parked near your border and what he's up to if a successful suckerpunch will lead to the complete collapse of organized national defense.

Re:Belgium is a NATO member (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45503977)

Well, Finland is bordering a nation with largest landmass in the world whose population has historically posed an existential risk to Finns with wars fought on the most centuries since pre-800 AD.

Existential risk? Since 800 AD? Wars? Um, Finland has not existed at all as a country during most of that time.

Re:Belgium is a NATO member (3, Insightful)

NettiWelho (1147351) | 1 year,25 days | (#45504115)

Existential risk? Since 800 AD? Wars? Um, Finland has not existed at all as a country during most of that time.

Yes, existential risk to Finns .
Finnic tribe habitation. 800 ad [wikimedia.org] Finnic tribe habitation. 912 ad [imgur.com] , also [imgur.com] ,
Earliest conflicts with Russians during existance of written records. [wikipedia.org]

And by the 14th century we arrive at this [wikimedia.org]

Re:Belgium is a NATO member (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45503955)

For contrast, if Finland was a state of usa, it'd be 5th in area and 23rd (if i remember correctly) in population.

Re:Belgium is a NATO member (1)

connor4312 (2608277) | 1 year,25 days | (#45504329)

An outstanding example of a non sequitur, congratulations!

Re:Belgium is a NATO member (-1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45503701)

The NSA was conducting a military operation against an ally.

The NSA is not a military organization. If you've ever actually worked with the military, you would know that agencies like NSA or CIA or ... often do not get along with the armed forces.

Re:Belgium is a NATO member (4, Informative)

shentino (1139071) | 1 year,25 days | (#45503737)

NSA is a subagency of the DOD and is headquartered inside a military base.

Re:Belgium is a NATO member (5, Informative)

larry bagina (561269) | 1 year,25 days | (#45503781)

You are aware that the Director of the NSA is Keith Alexander, an active duty 4-star general in the US Army, right? If you look at the previous NSA Directors, you'll probably notice a curious pattern.

Re:Belgium is a NATO member (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45503971)

If you look at the previous NSA Directors, you'll probably notice a curious pattern.

They're all white men?

Re:Belgium is a NATO member (1)

Holi (250190) | 1 year,25 days | (#45503853)

The NSA is most certainly a military organization. You should really read the Puzzle Palace and learn how the NSA was started.

Act of war. (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45503571)

Wasn't this exactly what the USA declared to be considered an act of war, that would justify retaliation with conventional weapons?

Re:Act of war. (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45503625)

Probably. You have to remember that the government has different standards for others than for us. We don't care if we violate international law. We only care if others violate the rules we set (be they laws we set or otherwise).

Re:Act of war. (4, Insightful)

Nyder (754090) | 1 year,25 days | (#45503759)

Probably. You have to remember that the government has different standards for others than for us. We don't care if we violate international law. We only care if others violate the rules we set (be they laws we set or otherwise).

Yes, The "Do as I say, not as I do" standard.

Re:Act of war. (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45503663)

You saw what happened to Iraq? You really want to stand up to those psychopaths? They will stack us naked.

don't be grandiose (5, Insightful)

rewindustry (3401253) | 1 year,25 days | (#45503817)

these people are not warriors - they are parasites, and should be treated as such.

it's simply criminal, they should go to jail, like all the rest.

Re:Act of war. (5, Informative)

NoKaOi (1415755) | 1 year,25 days | (#45504025)

Wasn't this exactly what the USA declared to be considered an act of war, that would justify retaliation with conventional weapons?

And the people with political power are the ones who stand to get even richer if it does start another war (digital or conventional). They don't care who else dies or if the economy as a whole goes down the shitter as long as they make money. The US's defense budget is HUGE, how much of that goes to private contracts? In 2011, $374 billion went to private contracts, 15 times greater than any other US federal agency.

Re:Act of war. (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45504099)

Wasn't this exactly what the USA declared to be considered an act of war, that would justify retaliation with conventional weapons?

Exactly, all members of the NSA are guilty of high treason. Think about it, over the last several decades they have worked quietly behind the scenes to deliberately weaken all encryption algorithms and computer/electronic security.

Every time a hospital or the electrical grid gets hacked and taken out of service, every time a rival hacks in and steals classified information from a government computer or trade secrets from a corporate one, every time someone's identity gets stolen, every time someone's computer gets infected by a virus, the NSA directly contributed to the ease by which this was done. That is IMHO directly supplying aid and comfort to enemies of the people.

Re: Act of war. (1)

gmuslera (3436) | 1 year,25 days | (#45504347)

No need to get to war. Just reject all government agreements with that hostile country, put your case in the ONU, La Haya or any other international entity related with this and rally the other affected countries to do the same, even put a trade embargo like the ones love to put. At the very least will serve to see which governments are in the bed with US in this, and would give their citizens a reason to kick them in the next election, as we know that the US people won't do that with their own government, no matter how much more corrupt will be disclosed that is in the following weeks/months.

Illegal? (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45503605)

I thought this was illegal? What can victims claim who lost data due to this?

Are they allowed under the law to break it?

Re:Illegal? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45503623)

What makes you think anybody "lost data" due to this?

Re:Illegal? (4, Insightful)

Angeret (1134311) | 1 year,25 days | (#45503783)

If it's good enough for the RIAA & MPAA to use the term, then it's good enough for the rest of the world.

Business is business (4, Insightful)

couchslug (175151) | 1 year,25 days | (#45503609)

It's reasonable to expect every intelligence agency to spy on anyone they can.

Perhaps as regards governments the hypocrisy should be dropped, and caught spies simply traded for other caught spies as was Cold War custom. Business IS business, and trusting anyone, even "allies" (whatever that means) can be childish especially if they are penetrated by enemy operatives.

How much we wish to restrain internal spying is another matter.

Re:Business is business (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45503671)

Why would you want caught spies back? They're the incompetent ones.

Re:Business is business (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45503677)

Internal spying is a large part of how one tries to detect moles, which is an activity that increases in importance as the number, and variety, of secrets you try to keep increases.

The idea that, "It's reasonable to expect every intelligence agency to spy on anyone they can," however is a problematic artifact of a world dominated by distrustful, and hostile, relations. The solution to that problem is obvious, although it's not politically or practically easy.

Re:Business is business (5, Insightful)

khasim (1285) | 1 year,25 days | (#45503707)

It's reasonable to expect every intelligence agency to spy on anyone they can.

Why is that "reasonable"? Shouldn't they be focusing their resources of groups/nations that present some threat to us?

Business IS business, and trusting anyone, even "allies" (whatever that means) can be childish especially if they are penetrated by enemy operatives.

Except that this hurts US businesses because now there will be more incentive for other nations (even friendly nations) to use something other than our products.

Not to mention that "penetrated by enemy operatives" sounds more like a movie synopsis rather than a rational approach to international diplomacy.

Re:Business is business (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45503789)

It's reasonable to expect every intelligence agency to spy on anyone they can.

Why is that "reasonable"? Shouldn't they be focusing their resources of groups/nations that present some threat to us?

The idea there is that (for example) Israel *does* present a nuclear armed threat to America because they have a set of conventional and nuclear capabilities that *could* threaten American interests. For this reason paranoid (professional intelligence) people in the US want to know all the details of what and where those capabilities are, and how they may or may not be used. The same goes for France, Belgium, Canada, etc.
Of course it would be totally wrong and reprehensible for any of those allies to spy on America to try and gain the same kind of information--that would threaten American security and autonomy!

The doublethink these fuckers won't even pause at is really quite something. (Captcha: Exceeds.)

Re:Business is business (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45503799)

Not to mention that "penetrated by enemy operatives" sounds more like a movie synopsis rather than a rational approach to international diplomacy.

It would seem that the NSA's approach to international diplomacy could be summed up in three words:
"Don't get caught."

Re:Business is business (2)

couchslug (175151) | 1 year,25 days | (#45503829)

"Not to mention that "penetrated by enemy operatives" sounds more like a movie synopsis rather than a rational approach to international diplomacy."

Such penetration was commonplace during the Cold War and no reason exists to believe it would stop since there is much to be gained from knowledge. International diplomacy should logically embrace the idea that there are "no friends or enemies, only interests" because it's really a bunch of different mobs cutting deals while vying for advantage.

"Except that this hurts US businesses because now there will be more incentive for other nations (even friendly nations) to use something other than our products."

Other nations are still screwed since no one is trustworthy. They can either buy from nations they don't mind monitoring them, buy from outright adversaries, or not give a shit and buy from the lowest bidder. They can also cut secret deals to share intel and benefit from monitoring. I highly doubt the spying was news to leadership, but it being made public requires some gesture be made.

If other nations avoid US software, fine and better for most Americans since software diversity and competition are good. I lose nothing if other nations stop buying Microsoft software. I gain if they have the foresight (Munich, cough, cough) to embrace Open and Free alternatives. If they make more hardware, the market gains by competition and diversity. I get more choice. I win.

If US companies want to assure potential customers their products are safe, they may submit them for audit. Perhaps the EU should have an Open software and hardware security audit process as a start.

Re:Business is business (1)

khasim (1285) | 1 year,25 days | (#45503961)

Such penetration was commonplace during the Cold War and no reason exists to believe it would stop since there is much to be gained from knowledge.

Then you shouldn't have any problem naming two such incidents. So prove it.

International diplomacy should logically embrace the idea that there are "no friends or enemies, only interests" because it's really a bunch of different mobs cutting deals while vying for advantage.

Yeah. That's why we have that string of military bases along the US/Canada border.

Seriously, that sounds like something from a movie. In the real world we do have friendly nations who are NOT going to attack us.

They can either buy from nations they don't mind monitoring them, buy from outright adversaries, or not give a shit and buy from the lowest bidder.

Really? Nothing about building it themselves? Or buying from a friendly nation that they trust NOT to spy on them like that? Those are the only options that you see?

If other nations avoid US software, fine and better for most Americans since software diversity and competition are good.

So cutting US exports is a good thing in your opinion? I would say that it was a problem.

And why would the software from other nations be compatible with our software? And if it isn't then there is the problem with "lock in" and not much benefit from "competition".

I get more choice. I win.

Apple has been around for years and has a lot of money.

And yet there are still times when dealing with a government agency or a private company that a Microsoft product is required.

So why do you think that this situation will be improved by introducing MORE platforms that are intentionally incompatible?

Re:Business is business (1)

tftp (111690) | 1 year,25 days | (#45504309)

Nothing about building it themselves? Or buying from a friendly nation that they trust NOT to spy on them like that?

If if a nation cannot develop computer software then probably you shouldn't even bother spying upon them :-) But even if a target nation is not known for software prowess but still warrants spying (Pakistan, Iran?) they still have F/OSS that can be obtained from multiple servers, compared, reviewed, compiled, and code-signed. Unlike digging ditches, one programmer can supply software for unlimited number of computers, and there are 182 million people in Pakistan, 77 million in Iran - some of them just have to be good at coding.

Re:Business is business (3, Interesting)

Nyder (754090) | 1 year,25 days | (#45503769)

It's reasonable to expect every intelligence agency to spy on anyone they can.

Perhaps as regards governments the hypocrisy should be dropped, and caught spies simply traded for other caught spies as was Cold War custom. Business IS business, and trusting anyone, even "allies" (whatever that means) can be childish especially if they are penetrated by enemy operatives.

How much we wish to restrain internal spying is another matter.

Nothing the NSA has been doing is reasonable.

Re:Business is business (1)

king neckbeard (1801738) | 1 year,25 days | (#45503787)

What about the people whose rights are trampled on by this? How about we treat spying on allies as a serious crime for which heads will roll like they should.

Re:Business is business (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45503927)

Any breach of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act will be dealt with swiftly and harshly. I'm sure the FBI is driving over there right now to investigate.

Re:Business is business (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45503889)

What a typical xtianism view of the world you have. Because xtians hate everyone, us normal people don't assume like you that it is acceptable for everyone else to hate everyone. Stop being like the USA xtians.

Re:Business is business (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45503925)

It's reasonable to expect every intelligence agency to spy on anyone they can.

It's reasonable to expect every child molester to rape any child he can get his hands on. But that does not mean that it's to be tolerated.

Re:Business is business (2)

Karganeth (1017580) | 1 year,25 days | (#45503957)

Your hand waving abilities are not as strong as you think. It's not reasonable to expect such behaviour. Regardless, it's not acceptable and that's what matters. I agree that acting shocked isn't going to help anyone's cause but something should be done to stop the NSA from being out of control.

Re:Business is business (1)

CAPSLOCK2000 (27149) | 1 year,25 days | (#45504127)

Just like it's reasonable to expect that one day thieves will break into your house and steal your TV.
It doesn't make it right.

Roadmap needed (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45503613)

Going forward, how can we nogotiate peace with the NSA? who can nogotiate on Americans behalf?

Re:Roadmap needed (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45503641)

Guy Fawkes

Re:Roadmap needed (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45503989)

Going forward, how can we nogotiate peace with the NSA? who can nogotiate on Americans behalf?

Peace .. no peace..

What is it you want us to do?

Die

Criminals! (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45503633)

So the NSA has committed illegal acts, violating the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, or whatever it is that they charge people with for "hacking."

A "warrant" can't authorize this kind of access, because warrants for "everything" are void, per the 4th Amendment of the US Constitution.

Now nobody can argue that they are nothing but a bunch of criminals.

Re:Criminals! (2)

larry bagina (561269) | 1 year,25 days | (#45503863)

Fear Not! Diane Feinstein is hard at work writing a new law to reform the NSA. And by "reform", I mean "retro-actively legalize everything they did, Constitution be damned."

No surprise (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45503637)

The only surprising part is the quantity ... but then it's counting whole networks, not quantity of installs ...

Re:No surprise (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45503667)

They are thinking quality not quantity. This isn't your typical spammers botnet where anything with a CPU is an asset

Sounds expensive. (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45503657)

I hate that my taxes paid for this.

Re: Sounds expensive. (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45504249)

Don't worry, they didn't. It was borrowed money.

Meh (1)

tavi.g (816536) | 1 year,25 days | (#45503659)

For the sake of the argument, don't such agencies need tools/methods to do their stuff ? So they infected computer networks.. where's the similar outrage with common spammers, that actually do have a global impact on internet traffic / quality of service ? We're in 2013.. the Internet isn't safe. Anything networked isn't safe. What does it matter that you can now put (another) face on the big bad Internet Bad Guy ? I mean, really, they can be "activated with the push of a button" - what are we talking about here, networks with internet access ? Were the owners expecting them to be private or something ? I too dislike an orwellian future, but some things just aren't worth fussing over. If the internet was a pristine place full of trust and good will, sure this would be shocking news. But it isn't.

So which systems were compromised... (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45503669)

So which systems were compromised, number would help. More importantly were any Linux or Unix systems compromised ?

Obama didn't know (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45503673)

He read about it in the paper, just today.

If you like your privacy, you can keep it. Period.*

*ends 1/21/2009. Subject to approval.

Low-hanging fruit (1, Flamebait)

Chompjil (2746865) | 1 year,25 days | (#45503685)

NSA targets Windows machines the most for obvious reasons This isnt exactly unknown news

NSA's relationship to AV companies (4, Interesting)

Qrypto (462155) | 1 year,25 days | (#45503697)

Did the NSA force AV companies to not track the NSA virus, then keep it "legally" secret?

Re:NSA's relationship to AV companies (3, Insightful)

muphin (842524) | 1 year,25 days | (#45503791)

Long answer, no
no all AV companies are US companies, IE Kaspersky...
and even if they were some people involved would have leaked the info

Re:NSA's relationship to AV companies (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45503915)

Kaspersky is as fucking US as you are the queen of England. It has a subsidiary, which is a US company, though.

Re:NSA's relationship to AV companies (1)

asmkm22 (1902712) | 1 year,25 days | (#45503865)

I think the NSA has the technical abilities to simply avoid detection in the first place and, if something does get detected, it's as a generic botnet program.

State-Sponsored Terrorism or an Act of War. (1)

gweihir (88907) | 1 year,25 days | (#45503699)

These are the two options of how to classify this thing. It is not really possible to get more evil in nature, just in scale.

adult weight loss (-1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45503723)

http://adultweightloss.blogspot.com/

Make spying a Casus foederis (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45503727)

The best way to stop the NSA from doing such kinds of things is to make spying on citizens a Casus foederis in the NATO contracts.
In case of ongoing spying, the attacked contries could defend themselves (hopefully with nuclear weapons).

As the US seem not to care about other peoples' human rights , it would be probably the best way, to stop this totalitarian goverment and fashist country.

Re:Make spying a Casus foederis (1)

couchslug (175151) | 1 year,25 days | (#45503843)

That would deny other NATO nations the advantages of similar espionage. Not smart on their part.

The Important Question most Americans are asking.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45503729)

What's the latest on Honey Boo-Boo?

These are the spasms before the end of empire (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45503731)

The US is choosing the path of aggression instead of the path
of civilized behavior.

This is a strategy designed by fools. If the fools responsible were the
only ones who would pay for their crimes that wouldn't be so bad.

But every American will pay for what a tiny minority of American swine have done.

By the way, before you start in with your xenophobic redneck moron responses, I AM an American,
and I see what is coming and I do not like it one bit. When the rest of the world has had enough
of the US overstepping its bounds, all the US military power won't make a bit of difference.
Economic sanctions alone can and will bring the US to its knees. If you don't believe this is
possible, you need to read more history.

.

Re:These are the spasms before the end of empire (2)

tibit (1762298) | 1 year,25 days | (#45503963)

In spite of everything, U.S. is still a big country with a lot of natural resources. The only reason most of those resources are not being exploited is availability of cheap resources from elsewhere. Sanctions that isolate the U.S. will merely shift the opportunity inwards. There'd be a whole lot of growth of the industry. Yeah, there'd also be the environmental problems that it brings, but oh well, at the moment we're merely exporting them.

Re:These are the spasms before the end of empire (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45504229)

The only reason most of those resources are not being exploited is availability of cheap resources from elsewhere.

Yes, we have plenty of resources ... and the cost of all of them will rise significantly. And what reason would the owners of these plentiful resources have for flooding the market with them once we are cut off from the rest of the world? Keeping them scarce keeps their prices artificially high for the same amount of effort to harvest them.

Wages won't go up, but everything else will. When the inflation starts getting out of hand most of the current population will have to choose between basic needs and paying their bills. The utility companies can't afford to run without getting paid. Banks, etc, can't steal what's left if the home owners can't pay their mortgages. Food - at least the food we still grow in the US - will go up due to scarcity and the fuel costs to get it to market.

It's one thing to try and force a country like Iran into a low standard of living. Most of the population (aprox 75mil) never was in or near the middle class. The US population of 300+ million will not handle this type of slide very well. The US can take care of themselves, but not at a reasonable cost. All these gadgets we're addicted to are imports, and some of the largest employers are the technology companies that "produce" them.

And let's not forget that the rest of the world will lose their largest client. That won't help their economies either. This doesn't end well.

Re:These are the spasms before the end of empire (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45504233)

In spite of everything, U.S. is still a big country with a lot of natural resources.

That must be why the US is in Iraq and Afghanistan, spending billions to
secure access to petroleum and rare earths it doesn't need.

.

Re:These are the spasms before the end of empire (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45504247)

"redneck moron"

I thought that we were suppose to support the "little guy." Nothing says "little guy" like "redneck." The term comes from the fact that they're out laboring in fields or on a construction site and have a "red neck" from exposure to the sun.

50k? (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45503747)

I would imagine there's a whole lot more of windows installations...

Reality check (2, Insightful)

Spiked_Three (626260) | 1 year,25 days | (#45503753)

Haha, look at all the AC posts. You guys are fricken cowards. Like posting anonymously is somehow going to prevent the government from knowing who you are.

Look, you give an agency the task of preventing damage to your country - that is what they are going to try and do, any way they can or have to. And lets be real, laws are just a game. Everyday we see how loopholes, misinterpretations etc are used to get around anything. You think ANYONE at ANYTIME expected GE, Apple, Microsoft to pay 0 taxes? And yet they do, year after year, because with the right efforts, all laws can be gotten around. Laws are what naive people follow, like religions (and religious laws).

If you want the NSA/FBI/CIA to stop spying on everyone, abolish them. Then enjoy your free country for about a year, because that is as long as it will last.

Otherwise understand it is a balance. A balance that people in those positions understand much better than the general public. Let them do their job.

Re:Reality check (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45503779)

Laws are what civilized people follow.

Re:Reality check (1)

sideslash (1865434) | 1 year,25 days | (#45504265)

Yes and no. Civilized people disobey grossly immoral laws. I suppose that Ayn Randians consider tax laws grossly immoral. :p

Re:Reality check (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45504191)

Haha, look at all the AC posts. You guys are fricken cowards. Like posting anonymously is somehow going to prevent the government from knowing who you are.

Not all of us have accounts or want accounts.

We are not hiding like your tiny little Uentermensch brain imagines,
we are simply doing what is convenient.

Re:Reality check (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45504259)

I use Tor, bitch.

Year Zero (3, Interesting)

Moppusan (2837753) | 1 year,25 days | (#45503767)

More and more the concept album "Year Zero" by Nine Inch Nails is becoming less "concept" and more "reality."

Windows Update is the mechanism (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45503879)

Windows Update is the main mechanism, not "malicious" software.

Fix the damn holes: require free code & monito (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45503905)

I'm sick of the lack of concern over security by everybody. People shouldn't say "the site requires active-x or the site requires flash or the site requires java" and accept that. Say NO and complain. It's ridicules that we should have to accept an active-x plug-in in order to find out if a default judgment has been levied against oneself for instance.

If more people would stop following the non-free software model and switch to picking out the best distributors (ie not the ones which include everything under the kitchen sink to make it 'easier') we wouldn't have this problem.

You don't even have to give up *everything*. Just pick some things. Stop using Microsoft Windows, stop using Microsoft Office, stop using Java/Flash/active-x, etc. Pick several and stick to it.

I use Adobe Flash, but have moved off of Microsoft Windows/active-x/Java and refuse to use anything requiring digital restrictions (like Netflix, Hulu, etc). I stream content from sites that are not DRM'd and use torrents.

I have one weakness. I do go to the movies so sadly the entertainment industry is getting paid still. However they aren't getting money from me in other ways either. Although mostly because I object to paying a cable company that advertises in the most unethical of manor and otherwise is horrible anyway. I don't accept that you can claim cable is 50x faster than DSL for instance. It's not. It's totally dependent on the speeds available in your area, the congestion of the cable system in your neighborhood, etc. Cable is always 'up to' whereas DSL is usually at the advertised speed short of line conditions or distance related issues. That's not the same thing as knowingly lying to customers about your capabilities (which are always limited) compared to the competition (which is only limited by, if,).
 

Tell that to Gary McKinnon (5, Insightful)

Alain Williams (2972) | 1 year,25 days | (#45503981)

The USA pursued Gary McKinnon [wikipedia.org] for a decade for cracking some USA military and NASA computers, mainly those where incompetent sysadmins had not changed default passwords. What Gary McKinnon was wrong; but this is also wrong and worse by an order of magnitude.

Do we assume that the USA gov't will hand over those responsible as it wanted the UK to hand over Gary McKinnon ? I would eat all of my hats if the USA gov't even talked about the possibility.

SELinux? (0)

Dadoo (899435) | 1 year,25 days | (#45504171)

That malicious software wouldn't happen to be called SELinux, would it?

Re:SELinux? (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45504361)

about 5 years ago, I was working on my PhD in computer security. We had a paper about some issues in SE Linux. We hadn't found any backdoors but there were a couple things that concerned us. It was accepted by a journal and then pulled at the last minute. No reason given but my advisor told us to drop it. "Bad career move" were the words he used.

NSA means JEW (-1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45504199)

Wake up Americans, for god's sake. The Jew has taken over your country completely.

Re:NSA means JEW (2)

jodido (1052890) | 1 year,25 days | (#45504315)

Which Jew? Maybe it's one of my cousins.

Re:NSA means JEW (2)

CheezburgerBrown . (3417019) | 1 year,25 days | (#45504519)

Wow, antisemitism in 2013.

troll harder, AC.

this is nothing compare to Malaysia (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,25 days | (#45504353)

What are you guys complaining about NSA monitoring you guys using illegal method. In Malaysia the gov cronnies own the isp here and they can monitor us 24/7 seeing what we type and so on unless we encrypt all our data. They can even see what I am typing now, best part of all we cant do anything while you guys can since it is illegal to sniff people privacy

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