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Snowden Says His Mission Is Accomplished

timothy posted about 7 months ago | from the so-where's-the-banner? dept.

Government 312

Hugh Pickens DOT Com writes "Edward Snowden met with reporters from the Washington Post for fourteen hours and in his first interview since June reflected at length about surveillance, democracy and the meaning of the documents he exposed. 'For me, in terms of personal satisfaction, the mission's already accomplished. I already won,' says Snowden. 'All I wanted was for the public to be able to have a say in how they are governed. That is a milestone we left a long time ago. Right now, all we are looking at are stretch goals.' Snowden says that the NSA's business is 'information dominance,' the use of other people's secrets to shape events. But Snowden upended the agency on its own turf. 'You recognize that you're going in blind, that there's no model,' says Snowden, acknowledging that he had no way to know whether the public would share his views. 'But when you weigh that against the alternative, which is not to act, you realize that some analysis is better than no analysis. Because even if your analysis proves to be wrong, the marketplace of ideas will bear that out.' Snowden succeeded because the NSA, accustomed to watching without being watched, faces scrutiny it has not endured since the 1970s, or perhaps ever, and says people who accuse him of disloyalty mistake his purpose. 'I am not trying to bring down the NSA, I am working to improve the NSA. I am still working for the NSA right now. They are the only ones who don't realize it.'"

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Well, at least (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45775303)

He's not wearing a jumpsuit and standing on an aircraft carrier with a banner behind him.

Re:Well, at least (5, Funny)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 7 months ago | (#45775667)

He's not wearing a jumpsuit and standing on an aircraft carrier with a banner behind him.

Damn, I was about to say the complete opposite: Until I see pics of Snowden in a jumpsuit on an aircraft carrier with a banner behind him, I don't buy it.

Re:Well, at least (1)

cold fjord (826450) | about 7 months ago | (#45776003)

It's probably closer to say that Snowden works with carrier waves, not carriers on the waves.

Re:Well, at least (1)

rossdee (243626) | about 7 months ago | (#45775807)

In Soviet Russia aircraft carrier lands on YOU

and since its that time of year
(to the tune of Chritmas is a coming)

Noun verbs you
Gentlemen
Noun verbs you
In Soviet Russia
Noun verbs YOU

Re:Well, at least (4, Insightful)

RDW (41497) | about 7 months ago | (#45775881)

He's not wearing an orange jumpsuit in a stress position with razor wire in front of him either.

Avoiding this indefinitely is probably one of the 'stretch goals' he mentions.

Re:Well, at least (1)

Vitriol+Angst (458300) | about 7 months ago | (#45775913)

Snowden isn't the only person who took a risk, the person stuffing that jumpsuit had to put some contents under pressure -- they risked losing their face. Much less the satellite based death beams cued to their DNA that will destroy them if they ever divulge secrets about "operation cod piece."

Right On (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45775317)

Snowden is a real hero. I am sorry he can't be home for the holidays this year because of his sacrifice.

Re:Right On (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45775415)

How is this flamebait? NSA voting again?

Of course not! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45775585)

Do you really think the NSA has time to waste on Slashdot? We have much more pressing issues to take care of.

Re:Of course not! (5, Interesting)

AHuxley (892839) | about 7 months ago | (#45775661)

Re:Of course not! (1)

cold fjord (826450) | about 7 months ago | (#45776009)

It wasn't really Slashdot they were interested in.

Re:Of course not! (4, Insightful)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 7 months ago | (#45775673)

Do you really think the NSA has time to waste on Slashdot? We have much more pressing issues to take care of.

Like trolling WoW.

Re:Right On (-1, Troll)

MickyTheIdiot (1032226) | about 7 months ago | (#45775647)

As much as I dislike the NSA, I have to say that Snowden proved himself to be not much more than the world's most affective troll.

He brought attention to the problem while simultaneously giving the shallow-thinking right-wing a scapegoat. He managed to promote and negate his views at the same time. There isn't a lot of positives to the story.

Re:Right On (5, Insightful)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 7 months ago | (#45775731)

giving the shallow-thinking right-wing a scapegoat.

Yea, amazing how short-sighted and narcissistic the typical American voter is, huh?

Like, when Bush II was in charge, setting up all these bullshit draconian laws, the self-proclaimed "liberals" wouldn't shut up about how horrible America would become if we allowed said policies to go into place. Flash forward 7 years - now it's the "liberal" guy in office, and suddenly all those horrible policies aren't considered so horrible after all... Unless, of course, you're a self-proclaimed "conservative," in which case letting "your guy's" laws fall into the hands of the "other guy" is the worst fucking thing to happen in American history.

Land of the free, alright - free of the ability to form cogent fucking thoughts.

Re:Right On (3, Insightful)

pellik (193063) | about 7 months ago | (#45775761)

Land of the free, alright - free of the ability to form cogent fucking thoughts.

There are plenty of smart people here who can form cogent thoughts. However we do seem to be free of the ambition to do so.

Re: Right On (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45775811)

Jesus! How many bales of hay did you use on all those strawmen?

Re:Right On (5, Informative)

anagama (611277) | about 7 months ago | (#45775865)

This drove me so crazy. The most perfect example of how rotten Democrats are, is Marty Lederman, who excoriated the Bush administration for using secret legal memos to authorize due process free detention, but who upon admittance to the Obama team, began writing the secret legal memos to justify due process free execution.

This is why I'm not a Democrat anymore --- evil is evil no matter who does it. The Democratic party's silence on the fact that Obama has embraced and extended every GWB policy they once complained about, has made me understand that GOP and DNC are purely tribal organizations with absolutely no basis in rationality, morality, or even a consistent kind of crazy. They're just teams working toward the same neo-con goals. I will never vote for anyone who is a member of either party.

Re: Right On (1)

jodido (1052890) | about 7 months ago | (#45775937)

Www.themilitant.com

Re:Right On (4, Insightful)

Vitriol+Angst (458300) | about 7 months ago | (#45775955)

"Flash forward 7 years - now it's the "liberal" guy in office, and suddenly all those horrible policies aren't considered so horrible after all..."

>> Liberal voter here. Nope -- I'm still pissed. I'm surprised the "Liberal media" wasn't informing you how troubled we are with Obama doing these things as well.

I held my nose and voted for Obama. What was my option here? Gordon Gecko? You think whichever boob we put in office isn't going to have these policies?

The reason Domestic spying is so bad is that they can use it to extort politicians, leaders and the media into compliance. Not that they need that with the way politicos have to thank zero interest loans from banks for affording office, and media personalities being titillating rather than educational.

So I don't think anyone is "OK" with this, other than people who say; "I'm OK with this -- thank you for defending my freedom!" And I think those people are idiots. I happen to know quite a few Liberals and Democrats and not many idiots. I've seen more conservatives "OK" with this domestic spying from my anecdotal experience. Not that it is productive getting in a tit-for-tat spat.

If impeaching Obama would end this -- I'd be for it. But really we need what we've always needed; campaign finance reform. Most corruption starts and ends with that.

Re:Right On (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45776015)

What was my option here?

Third parties. If you think not voting for evil is a wasted vote, then that mindset makes you part of the problem. The only wasted vote is one that goes towards evil, and both both parties are provably evil.

At the very least, you'll be helping to send a message to the two main parties.

Re:Right On (2)

MightyYar (622222) | about 7 months ago | (#45775981)

We have a serious problem with critical thinking in this country. If there is a good way to test for it, they should add it to these standardized tests that they teach to.

No It's Not (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45775323)

He may have gotten us all to open our eyes regarding the NSA, Constitutional abuses, Corporate America's involvement and capitulation, etc, but as long as he has more documents his mission is not complete.

And nothing has changed... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45775327)

And nothing has changed. What a waste of time. Enjoy your stay, comrade.

Re:And nothing has changed... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45775395)

Comrade?!? Really? Jesus you're a fucking moron.

Re:And nothing has changed... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45775733)

You read it... ;)

Now will you excuse me, I have to get back to watching Duck Dynasty...

Re:And nothing has changed... (5, Insightful)

Opportunist (166417) | about 7 months ago | (#45775397)

If nothing has changed, it's not his fault.

It's ours.

It's ours? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45775555)

It's our fault? For what? Duck Dynasty and their comments? How the football games turnout? Oooo! American Idol is on! Goota go!

Re:It's ours? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45775711)

Duck Dynasty

The latest in US red herring searches

How Fowl.

Re:And nothing has changed... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45775461)

You were hoping for change? From this administration?

Re: And nothing has changed... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45775523)

You're right, we need _real_ change, like what Dubya gave us.

Re: And nothing has changed... (5, Insightful)

JWW (79176) | about 7 months ago | (#45775593)

No! We need real change away from both what Bush did AND what Obama is doing.

Every time people make the "but Bush" argument they're giving Obama more power to abuse the system.

Meet the new boss, same as the old boss.

Re: And nothing has changed... (2)

MickyTheIdiot (1032226) | about 7 months ago | (#45775689)

I wish I had a mod point.

The usual procession of the conversation on this goes from "Obama did X, facscist, marxist, communist!" to "Bush did X too" to "OMG!!!1!! Obamabots don't take responsibility". Both of the last two administrations have MAJORLY fucked up our basic civil rights and since, once again, the air to so super-partisan we can't have a clear conversation about how the presidency is going downhill.

Re: And nothing has changed... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45775713)

Canadian define themselves as not Americans. So Obama is having a Canadian style identity crisis?

Re: And nothing has changed... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45775903)

The proper answer to "but Bush did it too" is "fuck that other war criminal, Bush too".

Captcha: cursing

Re:And nothing has changed... (1)

torsmo (1301691) | about 7 months ago | (#45775543)

No they were hoping for change from you, the people.

Re:And nothing has changed... (4, Insightful)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | about 7 months ago | (#45775501)

And nothing has changed. What a waste of time. Enjoy your stay, comrade.

It took years for this shit to become entrenched, it is going to take at least as long to unwind it.

Re:And nothing has changed... (1)

jythie (914043) | about 7 months ago | (#45775565)

The question will be, will the public have the attention span to push those years. Though a bigger problem is, because of how or voting works, will issues like this even have an impact?

Attention span? (1)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | about 7 months ago | (#45776007)

Attention span? Absolutely NOT! The public can't remember when 9/11/01 happened. Heck, they've already forgotten the Boston Marathon bombing.

Re: Where's the Banner (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45775349)

In the George W. Bush Presidential Library long-term storage, archived next to many of your liberties.

I disagree (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45775355)

The NSA should be dismantled....

Hang on, someone's at the door.

Re:I disagree (2)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45775403)

I agree with Snowden that the NSA can serve a useful purpose. We do need a way to protect the country's lines of communications. We don't need them snooping on people without just cause.

Re:I disagree (1)

Thanshin (1188877) | about 7 months ago | (#45775473)

Don't be ridiculous.

Have you seen the traffic? We'll need at least half an hour to reach you. Please stay put.

Secretly yours,
NSA.

NSA christmas greeting (2)

aliquis (678370) | about 7 months ago | (#45775573)

We don't want a lot for Christmas
We know almost everything we need
We don't care about the peasants
They give their information for free

We just want you for our own
You are ours Edward Snow'n
Make our wish come true oh
All we want for Christmas is you

Re:I disagree (1)

aliquis (678370) | about 7 months ago | (#45775591)

Oh, so that's what AMD Mantle is for ..

"Here, take this graphics card, it's good for you."

Re:I disagree (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45775907)

for that matter, any 3 letter agency should

They could have listened to him... (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45775375)

... when he was working there. According to Forbes, his coworkers report that he would wear a Electronic Frontier Foundation hoodie to work and have a copy of the constitution on his desk to argue when he was asked to do something against the constitution.
They just had to emulate him and he would still be in Hawai with his girlfriend and working for the NSA.

Re:They could have listened to him... (3, Interesting)

DexterIsADog (2954149) | about 7 months ago | (#45775559)

... when he was working there. According to Forbes, his coworkers report that he would wear a Electronic Frontier Foundation hoodie to work and have a copy of the constitution on his desk to argue when he was asked to do something against the constitution.

Oh my goodness, they really were clueless then. Even though I agree he's a hero, from a commonsense standpoint, I'm not kidding - they had someone working in a spook agency literally wearing his feelings about freedom on his sleeve, arguing using THE CONSTITUTION, and they didn't watch him closely?

Whether you think the NSA is the devil, on the side of the angels, or somewhere in between, their inaction in the face of these clear signals an employee disagreed with how they conduct their business is extraordinarily incompetent.

Re:They could have listened to him... (3, Interesting)

oneiron (716313) | about 7 months ago | (#45775639)

...or they secretly agreed with him and hoped he'd do something about it.

Re:They could have listened to him... (3)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 7 months ago | (#45775749)

...or they secretly agreed with him and hoped he'd do something about it.

That's actually a fair point, since it's unlikely that a lowly contractor would be working in the same facility as the higher-ups who would stand to lose from such a disclosure...

His fellow 'agents' may very well have encouraged him to expose the materials.

Re:They could have listened to him... (4, Funny)

Richy_T (111409) | about 7 months ago | (#45775669)

Heck, with a copy of the constitution on his desk, his surprising he wasn't charged with possessing terrorist literature.

Re:They could have listened to him... (1)

edibobb (113989) | about 7 months ago | (#45775819)

The U.S. Constitution would be considered terrorist literature by some in government if they'd ever read it.

Working for free? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45775377)

I work for several thousand employers, because I said so. Although they aren't paying me and won't acknowledge that I work for them, they're sooooooo going on my resume.

Re:Working for free? (1)

Richy_T (111409) | about 7 months ago | (#45775677)

He'd like his red stapler, please.

Not just NSA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45775387)

Great. Now do the CIA. Now do the various surveillance agencies of the UK, Russia, etc. Now do China. Now do the corporations, etc. etc.

if we like being spied on & censored... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45775399)

we can keep it. even if we don't like it we must keep it? sounds like our fictional heritage? free the innocent stem cells

What he said in the interview (2, Insightful)

tomhath (637240) | about 7 months ago | (#45775407)

It's pretty obvious from what he says in the interview that he was well coached ahead of time on what message to get out. But despite that, he comes across as essentially saying that he's smarter and more moral than anyone in the executive, judicial, or legislative branches of government.

There are ways to address concerns about abuses of government power, he chose the nuclear route. Whether exposing the abuses of power that were happening is worth the side effects remains to be seen.

Re:What he said in the interview (4, Insightful)

bluefoxlucid (723572) | about 7 months ago | (#45775471)

It is incredibly easy to be smarter and more moral than anyone in the executive, judicial, and legislative branches of the government.

Sometimes you need to detonate the on-site warhead.

Re:What he said in the interview (4, Funny)

RabidReindeer (2625839) | about 7 months ago | (#45775635)

It is incredibly easy to be smarter and more moral than anyone in the executive, judicial, and legislative branches of the government.

General opinion is that even used-car salesman can do as much.

Re:What he said in the interview (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 7 months ago | (#45775755)

It is incredibly easy to be smarter and more moral than anyone in the executive, judicial, and legislative branches of the government.

General opinion is that even used-car salesman can do as much.

When I was a kid, we had one really, really smart chicken.

I'd bet on ol' Roy the Rooster in a battle of wits with damn near any politician.

Re:What he said in the interview (3)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45775481)

There are ways to address concerns about abuses of government power, he chose the nuclear route.

Well, of course. Do you honestly believe that the government would self-regulate? All those governments abusing powers throughout history must be a figment of my imagination, because there's no way that governments aren't composed of perfect beings! And I don't see any reason why the people shouldn't be aware of the abuses of power.

I'm glad he took what you call "the nuclear route."

Re:What he said in the interview (1)

oodaloop (1229816) | about 7 months ago | (#45775503)

he comes across as essentially saying that he's smarter and more moral than anyone in the executive, judicial, or legislative branches of government.

Those two bars are not especially hard to cross.

Re:What he said in the interview (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45775505)

He is not saying he is smarter, but you got the rest right.

Re:What he said in the interview (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45775511)

It's pretty obvious from what he says in the interview that he was well coached ahead of time on what message to get out. But despite that, he comes across as essentially saying that he's smarter and more moral than anyone in the executive, judicial, or legislative branches of government.

Not that that's difficult.

Re:What he said in the interview (5, Insightful)

AHuxley (892839) | about 7 months ago | (#45775541)

There is no open court "route" left in the US for cleared staff. You face the people you work for with your cleared lawyer selected from a short list of lawyers in a sealed court. He's smarter as in he saw the many who have tried before him and saw the color of law results - even with political support in sealed courts - nothing gets done or out to the tame US press. The rest is history, for academics, the press, lawyers and courts to work out in the US and around the world over time.
Better crypto for all the internet and less junk software is always a good thing :)

Re:What he said in the interview (5, Informative)

anagama (611277) | about 7 months ago | (#45775901)

You are correct -- in Snowden's case, it is actually impossible for him to mount a defense at trial:

https://pressfreedomfoundation.org/blog/2013/12/if-snowden-returned-us-trial-all-whistleblower-evidence-would-likely-be-inadmissible [pressfreed...dation.org]

If Edward Snowden comes back to the US to face trial, he likely will not be able to tell a jury why he did what he did, and what happened because of his actions. Contrary to common sense, there is no public interest exception to the Espionage Act. Prosecutors in recent cases have convinced courts that the intent of the leaker, the value of leaks to the public, and the lack of harm caused by the leaks are irrelevant -- and are therefore inadmissible in court.

Oh, they are worth it (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45775577)

> he comes across as essentially saying that he's smarter and more moral than anyone in the executive, judicial, or legislative branches of government ... which seems not to be a very high bar, alas.

> he chose the nuclear route [...]

which other routes, pray tell, were open to him?

> Whether exposing the abuses of power that were happening is worth the side effects [...]

It is worth the side effects. It can be seen already.

Re:What he said in the interview (1)

anmre (2956771) | about 7 months ago | (#45775583)

Well, you can attack his character with impunity because there would be no way to prove or disprove your assertion (I have never met him, and I'm sure that you haven't either). And calling what he did the "nuclear route" is hyperbolic at best (nobody died).

Re:What he said in the interview (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45775607)

I think there are a lot of smart people in the executive, judicial, legislative, and even in the intelligence branches of government. The problem is, they are in opposition (e.g., the executive preventing consideration of these issues by blocking court cases for years), the judiciary can only interpret the law as it is, the legislature has signed "blank checks" and been told only a limited amount of information about what is actually going on, and the intelligence agencies have regularly downplayed or outright lied about what they are actually doing.

At no point have the public been properly informed or consulted on this. Everything that was done to this point was a token, bogus effort. In the government it's a lot of smart people with (I believe) largely good intentions, but none of them have been allowed to see all of the pieces of the puzzle at once, or alternatively been able to share it with the public to get the public's views. That's a fundamental failure that defies the entire point of democracy and representative government. Yes, Snowden "chose the nuclear route" to get information out there, but considering the couple of decades of opportunity for any of those branches of government to do the right (inform and consult the public), it was justified. There was ample time for smart people in government to say "Wait, no, we shouldn't be doing this. At least, not without the public *really* knowing about it and giving their okay." Fail.

While I agree exposing these abuses of power has come at a high cost, there are two reasons why my concerns are tempered: 1) government had their chance to do it right, and didn't; 2) if nothing else, this episode should demonstrate yet again what most people should already know: you can't keep a secret forever, and it's better to get in front of it than to deal with the aftermath of an uncontrolled release to the public that isn't on your terms.

The public probably would be willing to grant the NSA and other intelligence agencies a lot of leeway to do their job, if properly monitored. Now? Not so much, because public trust has been violated.

Re:What he said in the interview (1)

taiwanjohn (103839) | about 7 months ago | (#45775685)

Wish I had mod points today. +1 Insightful.

Re:What he said in the interview (5, Informative)

anagama (611277) | about 7 months ago | (#45775815)

Actually, there aren't any ways to address government abuse of power, except whistleblowing.

Kiriakou: torture whistleblower, only person person to go to prison over torture. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Kiriakou [wikipedia.org]

Binney: Going to the DOJ about waste in the NSA will fuck up your life: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Binney_(U.S._intelligence_official) [wikipedia.org]

Drake: Going through the legal processes within the NSA got him prosecuted: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Andrews_Drake [wikipedia.org]

Re:What he said in the interview (4, Interesting)

Midnight Thunder (17205) | about 7 months ago | (#45775989)

There are ways to address concerns about abuses of government power, he chose the nuclear route. Whether exposing the abuses of power that were happening is worth the side effects remains to be seen.

There are, but when you are likely to get brushed under the rug, other approaches need to be used. He essentially blew a hole through the rug, meaning there was no way to hide his message.

Was the way he did things the best way, it is hard to say, since I don't fully grasp the workings of the agency, but I suspect that there are too many people with vested interests in hiding their and the agencies failings? Sometimes in politics you need someone to put their neck on the line for the greater good, but it has to be done with care since otherwise to have collateral damage and possibly a miscommunicated message. IMHO Snowdon probably did something many people would have wanted to do, in the sense of causing change, but are too stuck in the political labyrinth to achieve anything. Don't underestimate the weight of government and bureaucracy to block real change. Too many stake holders who either have vested interests or don't want to experience change.

However you look at things, Snowdon was brave, but he did follow his convictions to the end. I think many of us would be too coward to do what he did.

Congratulations! (0)

jellomizer (103300) | about 7 months ago | (#45775455)

You released a bunch of information so the average american public can not understand it correctly, feel overtly threatened, and force them to make rushed, out of the moment changes.

We all know theses rushed out the moment policy changes always turn out good.

Anyone will know, it will take one other attack for the General public to go up and screaming back at the NSA for not doing its job, if because they didn't see it coming.

Re:Congratulations! (1)

cheekyjohnson (1873388) | about 7 months ago | (#45775529)

Anyone will know, it will take one other attack for the General public to go up and screaming back at the NSA for not doing its job, if because they didn't see it coming.

That has more to do with their lack of principles (Whatever happened to "the land of the free and the home of the brave"? It never existed.) than what Snowden has done.

Re:Congratulations! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45775579)

You released a bunch of information so the average american public can not understand it correctly, feel overtly threatened, and force them to make rushed, out of the moment changes.

We all know theses rushed out the moment policy changes always turn out good.

Anyone will know, it will take one other attack for the General public to go up and screaming back at the NSA for not doing its job, if because they didn't see it coming.

Shut up you fool! *turns to computer camera* NO, NSA, No! We will not go running back to you if we are attacked by more terrorists. Bad, NSA, put down the bomb!

Re:Congratulations! (2)

AHuxley (892839) | about 7 months ago | (#45775609)

The US public understands the role of the Fourth Amendment, the role of supporting 'freedom fighters' and woke up to the rush for war in Syria before it was too late.
Thanks to Snowden the US courts are able to understand what was going on domestically and there is less cover for tame press and well funded sock puppets.
http://www.freedomwatchusa.org/federal-judge-rules-against-nsa [freedomwatchusa.org]

Re:Congratulations! (1)

DexterIsADog (2954149) | about 7 months ago | (#45775613)

Rushed changes? WHAT rushed changes? Do you mean the report that the President requested last July that he's now reading (and you can read it too), before deciding what changes, if any, to make to data collection policies?

Perhaps you mean the (possible) pullback on monitoring the cell phones of the leaders or our allies, like Angela Merkel. They didn't say, but I would imagine they'd stop doing that shit, at least for a while.

So, what was your point again?

Re:Congratulations! (1)

MickyTheIdiot (1032226) | about 7 months ago | (#45775721)

Rushed changes = removing more freedoms in the name of security.

Re:Congratulations! (1)

oodaloop (1229816) | about 7 months ago | (#45775765)

Rushed changes? WHAT rushed changes?

Well, I encrypted my hard drive and changed my passwords. Should I have waited?

Re:Congratulations! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45775633)

who fucking cares.

They who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.

Re:Congratulations! (5, Insightful)

jbmartin6 (1232050) | about 7 months ago | (#45775693)

Sad part is, there is nothing they "could have done" to prevent the 9/11 attacks that was prevented by the legal actions available at the time. There was absolutely no need for any additional powers or surveillance. Since they found zip with all the new surveillance after 10 years, I think it is safe to conclude the threat is greatly exaggerated. Where were they when the Boston Marathon attacks were being planned? They were snooping on Brazilian oil companies.

Re:Congratulations! (1)

Anubis IV (1279820) | about 7 months ago | (#45775703)

The American public can't understand it correctly unless they are first exposed to it. Prior to a few months ago, how often did you hear normal people using terms like "metadata"? And now?

Though the process might hurt and might not turn out perfect, it's far better that we, as a country, go through these growing pains and make these decisions now, together, rather than forfeiting that opportunity by allowing the decisions to be made for us in shadowy, smoke-filled rooms. We've gone from having no say in the matter to actually having a say, which is how it should be. Where it goes from here is anyone's guess, but at least our options are open again.

He's working for the NSA he says.... (-1)

8127972 (73495) | about 7 months ago | (#45775467)

'I am not trying to bring down the NSA, I am working to improve the NSA. I am still working for the NSA right now. They are the only ones who don't realize it.'

Neither does POTUS, The Congress, The Senate, the American public, or Fox News for that matter.

Re:He's working for the NSA he says.... (1)

phayes (202222) | about 7 months ago | (#45775631)

That's only because they do not realise that Snowden is so much smarter/more moral than anyone else (except possibly for those who agree with him).

Re:He's working for the NSA he says.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45775663)

I always thought this was the deepest of deep cover ops. So deep even the NSA buys the cover. (Not really.)

Re:He's working for the NSA he says.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45775927)

I understand it completely. The NSA has long hijacked itself and gone rogue. Look at the Clipper chip, RSA bribery and other actions. That isn't improving security it is making all of security worse because they're too damn lazy to do their job and are operating under a stupid and arrogant assumption that they can make holes "only they can access". His actions expose the one essential improvement, that we either need or have to have the NSA taken behind the barn for a functioning democracy - being under control of the people.

Putin Schooling Obama (1)

njhunter (613589) | about 7 months ago | (#45775469)

And by extension, US.

14.4 Sec. for Library of Congress (2)

bigfoottoo (2947459) | about 7 months ago | (#45775575)

One of Snoiwden's coworkers told him that they were processing as much data as in the Library of Congress every 14.4 seconds. Sources say that the Library of Congress has 235 TBytes of data.
(235 [TByte] / 14.4 [sec]) X 60 [sec/min] X 60 [min/hr] X 24 [hr/day] = 1.4 X10^18 [Bytes/day] = 1.4 [Exabytes/day]

Re:14.4 Sec. for Library of Congress (4, Interesting)

AHuxley (892839) | about 7 months ago | (#45775857)

Processing is what was always done, listening to a call for keywords, known numbers used, voice print - the resulting file size kept was not huge per call, person.
The flow of data in was vast but not hard for the US and UK to balance for fast processing over a few sites around the world.
https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2013/08/dea-and-nsa-team-intelligence-laundering [eff.org] really shows the end game - decades of calls reduced to a usable size under just one simple program.
The next trick will be to have it made legal in US domestic courts, no more magical parallel construction needed :)

So there. (1)

leftie (667677) | about 7 months ago | (#45775637)

Nya.

the sea crashed in on the advancing infidels? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45775655)

another WMD on credit religious franchise corepirate nazi work of fiction we still believe although we know better results never vary so far http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mk9mV8qBiEk though we lament never again again & again

Just another turf war (1)

fustakrakich (1673220) | about 7 months ago | (#45775715)

Now that the Post is *owned* by the CIA...

Lady liberty (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45775737)

Lady Liberty is now a corporate whore with fishnet leggings and crotchless panties, ready to take it from any corporate executive for the right price.

Snowden for President (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45775767)

This man is a hero, he stood up for freedom of the people at the cost of his own freedom security. He stood up against a tyrannical power that sought to undermine our way of life. That is the essence of what it means to be American, fighting against tyranny.

We need new leaders who are willing to actually put themselves, their jobs, their very freedoms on the line to keep us safe. A government that sacrifices the freedoms of the people to protect itself is doing it wrong. Sacrifice is not for "someone else" to make, so we can be better off / more secure. Our current leaders don't stand up for us, they don't even make sacrifices to do what's right. They stand up for their own money, interests, and power.

I'm very happy for him but sad about Angelina (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45775769)

Congratulations to Frederic Snowden but I just found out something that really makes me sad and wish to end my life. I was in a comma for many years but when I woke up they told me that Angelina Jolie had cut off her tater tots. Is this true? Because I don't want to live in this world if it is.

Good work reporting it (1)

gmuslera (3436) | about 7 months ago | (#45775771)

Now is our turn to do the acknowledge that it is happening, avoiding its worst effects, and if possible, fixing it.

And with a good precedent too. (2)

bluegutang (2814641) | about 7 months ago | (#45775791)

"A republic, if you can keep it." -Benjamin Franklin

"Remember, I didn’t want to change society. I wanted to give society a chance to determine if it should change itself." -Edward Snowden.

Yep. (0)

ledow (319597) | about 7 months ago | (#45775917)

I'm afraid I have to agree.

Impact of all those Wikileaks, etc. bullshit? One bloke hiding in an embassy in the UK after skipping bail, nobody really giving a shit until he comes out and faces trial.

Impact of Snowden? News stories the world over, plus demands for change in many places, and outright disgust at what's been going on behind our backs.

Snowden did exactly what he wanted (and, I would say, needed) to. At ENORMOUS personal risk. He'll never really be "safe" again.

Compare and contrast to "dickhead hiding with a UV lamp" Assange, who is going to go to jail for skipping bail and didn't have one tenth of one percent of the impact of Snowden - and is going to go to jail for NOTHING to do with what he leaked, really. Nobody even really cares enough any more, we just want him to fuck off and stop eating up taxpayer's money while he avoids justice.

Best part of the story (2)

FuzzNugget (2840687) | about 7 months ago | (#45775973)

We finally have a new picture of him.

How do you get the average person to care. (3, Interesting)

EMG at MU (1194965) | about 7 months ago | (#45776027)

There are some people that I would consider "smart" that don't even know who Snowden is or what the NSA does. These people are successful professionals, some valedictorians of their undergraduate colleges. There is always going to be a small segment of the population that is critical of the government, paranoid about the encroachment on civil liberties, and overall dissatisfied with the status quo. But that isn't a majority. Its not even half. I would guess it's less than 25%.

Snowden sacrificed a lot for the world. I wish I knew of a way to get the world to care.
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