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Internet Shutdown Adds To Venezuela's Woes

timothy posted about 6 months ago | from the if-weren't-for-that-pernicious-free-market dept.

Censorship 194

Slashgear reports that many state-run internet links in Venezuela have been shut down by that country's government, as censorship efforts there step up along with widespread turmoil, partly in the form of widespread anti-government protests. The article begins: "Don’t expect one whole heck of a lot of tweets coming out of Venezuela in the immediate future as President Nicolas Maduro’s government has shut down the internet and select TV channels. Having shut down Twitter access for the area this past week, Venezuela’s state-run ISP CANTV has been cut in areas such as San Cristobal. This area is a regional capital in the west of the country and CANTV controls the vast majority of internet connectivity in the area. The Electronic Frontier Foundation made note that Venezuelans working with several different ISPs lost all connectivity on Thursday of this past week. Users lost connectivity to the major content delivery network Edgecast and the IP address which provides access to Twitter’s image hosting service while another block stopped Venezuelan access to the text-based site Pastebin."

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This is true (5, Informative)

Skatox (1109939) | about 6 months ago | (#46314123)

I'm Venezuelan and I live in San Cristobal, my Internet service was cut 36 hours by my ISP (Cantv which is the biggest in the country and fastest, but it's owned by the goverment). This was due to prevent comunication because my city is one with the most prostest in the country, also, a the same time where it was shutdown, the Minister of Defence annouced militar strategies to control riots in the city. People are using Twitter and Zello app, to comunite and to know what's happening because traditional media is not publishing this events.

Re: This is true (-1, Flamebait)

Carlos J. Nucette D. (3548031) | about 6 months ago | (#46314193)

Is not true, i live un Venezuela too and i don't have any problem with my internet.

Re: This is true (2)

Skatox (1109939) | about 6 months ago | (#46314209)

Because you don't live in San Cristobal. If you read the article, this happend in San Cristobal and some zones in Tachira.

Re: This is true (2)

SuperKendall (25149) | about 6 months ago | (#46314213)

I'm glad you can speak for all users of the internet across Venezuela, very impressive.

He's s shill probably (4, Informative)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | about 6 months ago | (#46314501)

If you look at his account, it is brand new and this is his only post. I've noticed this kind of thing on various sites when there's a story on Venezuela that is critical of the government or that talks about the problems happening. People who have never posted before pop up and say it isn't true, or blame the US, or whatnot.

Now maybe they were longtime readers who just happened to suddenly decide to participate, but I kinda doubt it. I think it is a bunch of pro-government types that are out to shill. Could be officially sanctioned, could just be a bunch of nationalist types (which all countries seem to have) that are doing it of their own accord.

Seems to be happening fairly often with Venezuela stories though, so one way or another I think this is a concerted effort on the part of some people, and not just happenstance.

Re:He's s shill probably (3, Insightful)

lgw (121541) | about 6 months ago | (#46314517)

Welcome to Communism. Totalitarian leader. Oppressive regime. Total economic collapse. Continuous propaganda internal and external.

Re:He's s shill probably (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46314559)

Under capitalism, man exploits man.

Under Communism, man exploits man, and they censor the Internet.

Re:He's s shill probably (3, Interesting)

kasperd (592156) | about 6 months ago | (#46314909)

Under Communism, man exploits man, and they censor the Internet.

I think that is not communism but rather corruption. I suspect communism might be so prone to get corrupted, that many people cannot tell the difference between communism and corruption.

Re:He's s shill probably (2, Insightful)

TheGratefulNet (143330) | about 6 months ago | (#46314921)

join the club!

at this point in the US's history, I can't tell the diff between capitalism and corruption.

Re:He's s shill probably (1)

kasperd (592156) | about 6 months ago | (#46315339)

at this point in the US's history, I can't tell the diff between capitalism and corruption.

I see your point.

Re:He's s shill probably (3, Insightful)

DarkOx (621550) | about 6 months ago | (#46315209)

People never seem to understand is Communism just exchanges one currency for another, instead of trading gold or dollars of people just trade political influence and favors. Naturally favors and influence are much harder to account for the dollars, so the tendency is going to be of course toward corruption as transparency becomes nearly impossible.

Re:He's s shill probably (2, Informative)

DarkOx (621550) | about 6 months ago | (#46315187)

No under capitalism no one is exploited. Values exchanges for value and nobody does anything forcibly against their will. It's only when you add government activity beyond the protection of private property that you get exportation. Suddenly there all these regulations and tax requirements and other things that require people to do things.

Re:He's s shill probably (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | about 6 months ago | (#46315221)

No under capitalism no one is exploited.

What colour is the sky on your planet?

Values exchanges for value and nobody does anything forcibly against their will.

Sure. And people can just decide not to eat for prolonged time whenever no acceptable way to generate income is available. </sarcasm>

It's only when you add government activity beyond the protection of private property that you get exportation.

You mean, government activity like protection of lives? Protection of freedom? Or protection of any other human rights?

Re:He's s shill probably (1)

DarkOx (621550) | about 6 months ago | (#46315251)

Sure. And people can just decide not to eat for prolonged time whenever no acceptable way to generate income is available.

If you want to eat offer something of value to someone with food. Truth is the number of people in the US who could not afford the calories basic nutrients they need to survive even is vanishingly small. Sure that might mean a diet of whatever canned vegetable is on special this week, beans, fortified bread and water; eaten cold because you have no resources with which to cook it. Pretend whatever you want but most people could easily meet their needs if they thought about it.

Not eating when you are unwilling to do anything for your supper is not exploitation, demanding someone feed you is.

You mean, government activity like protection of lives? Protection of freedom? Or protection of any other human rights?

I would argue freedom and private property are synonymous. Please try to define freedom without it coming down to being able to have things that are yours to do with as 'you like' or a have a place to do in what 'you wish'. Protecting private property is again pretty much the same thing as protecting lives. Nobody should be able to just kill you and take your stuff, instead they should have to offer you something you will accept in exchange for it. Nobody should be able to come and kill you for practicing your faith in your home, its your home; etc. "Human rights" needs a defined as well, that means something different to pretty much anyone you ask.

 

Re:He's s shill probably (1)

3.5 stripes (578410) | about 6 months ago | (#46315257)

You mean like during the Early Industrial revolution?

It's comments like yours that make people dismiss libertarians as disconnected from reality.

Re:He's s shill probably (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46315263)

It's only when you add government activity beyond the protection of private property that you get exportation

You mean a non minimalist government is necessary for a net positive balance in international commerce.

Re:He's s shill probably (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about 6 months ago | (#46314809)

You act as if any of "our" regimes would act differently when the protests start. Rest assured, the first thing that will be shut down is communication between protesters.

Re:He's s shill probably (1)

johanw (1001493) | about 6 months ago | (#46314969)

The Brits were discussing of blocking BBM when they had riots some time ago, but they ended before a decision could be made.

Re:He's s shill probably (1)

donaldm (919619) | about 6 months ago | (#46314861)

Welcome to Communism. Totalitarian leader. Oppressive regime. Total economic collapse. Continuous propaganda internal and external.

Err! were does it state that Venezuela politics is communistic? although the major parities do have those type of leanings but basically the people do have the right to vote with the voting age starting at 18. If you stated that the political party has leanings of Fascist-ism then I may agree with you however the truth is much more complex. If you look at the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/V... [slashdot.org] > Wiki you will find out that "Venezuela is among the most violent places on Earth. In Venezuela, a person is murdered every 21 minutes." This is mainly due to the high crime rate and rampant corruption.

I will leave this to the citizens of Venezuela to elaborate further.

Re:He's s shill probably (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46314897)

Err! were does it state that Venezuela politics is communistic? although the major parities do have those type of leanings but basically the people do have the right to vote with the voting age starting at 18.

Yeah, so what? How is voting incompatible with communism?

Communism is collective ownership of all and unrestrained Democracy is collective ownership of all through the vote.

Re:He's s shill probably (2)

circletimessquare (444983) | about 6 months ago | (#46314693)

with venezuela, the kneejerk "blame america" is pretty swift and is standard

when venezuelans started protesting last week, they kicked out some american diplomats in response

http://www.cnn.com/2014/02/17/... [cnn.com]

either:

1. the usa is pushing magic buttons in washington dc and making venezuelans revolt (and not the actual issues and problems about venezuela the people revolting articulate)

2. it's a tired bullshit cynical ploy that, unfortunately, still works with large enough of the population that it is still worth doing

or... i dunno, as an american, maybe i have dark magical powers over venezuela i have not fully explored

Re:He's s shill probably (0)

johanw (1001493) | about 6 months ago | (#46314965)

The magic buttons of the US are $$$$ and the promise of lucrative contracts (read: more bribes) for a new ruling caste when the old one, which is not US friendly, has been removed. That's the same since the 1950's in Latin America so why should it be dufferent now (or why would the Venezuelan government think it would be different now)?

The US POV is probably: the current Venezuelan government offered Snowden asylum soit has to be destroyed.

Re:He's s shill probably (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46314971)

Well, here, in the USA, land of the freedom, where you are spied upon, disallowed to board a plain because you look suspicious and forced to remain indoors at special events, it is considered a big offence to censor communications, so that's why it looks bad that Venezuela is shutting down access to twitter.

But if you actually look at the information posted on twitter [eldiario.es] , you will notice that *real* reporters have been tearing down all these twits identifying them as fake photos, from several years ago, other countries, etc, spreading FUD.

Consider this: Venezuela had Maduro win the elections, no fround, popular vote. Now both Maduro and the opposition are requesting there to be no violent protests. Where the fuck this violent people come from, huh?

Re: This is true (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46314239)

Don't know much but existential quantifier does not imply universal quantifier. There may be different ISP's and who knows how many access points there are into Venezuela.

Re: This is true (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46314241)

Not everyone is affected. Usually it's some zones for those who use CANTV. If you have another ISP or live in a Maduro-supporting zone you'll be OK.

Outside of Caracas, other ISPs don't have much of a foothold, so shutting down CANTV will kill a lot of the internet access. In Caracas you probably use cable instead.

Re: This is true (1)

Saúl González D. (3429883) | about 6 months ago | (#46314255)

It depends on location and ISP. I'm guessing your ISP isn't CANTV.

Hi, jack (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46314313)

It looks like this new slashdot look isn't going away. What are some other news sites with equivalent stories that I can read instead?

Re:Hi, jack (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 6 months ago | (#46314491)

You could log in and be on Classic in one jiffy!

Re:Hi, jack (1)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | about 6 months ago | (#46314831)

Don't lie. I used my stopwatch, and it takes 3.18 jiffies to get logged in.

Re:Hi, jack (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | about 6 months ago | (#46315233)

soylentnews.org
pipedot.org

Re: This is true (1)

Ateocinico (32734) | about 6 months ago | (#46314413)

San Cristobal was isolated from the internet. But the rest of the country suffers the blocking of certain sites like NTN24. But the use of TOR and other measures is spreading.

Re: This is true (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46314587)

I don't care if I have Internet or not, if I'm running into troubles to find toilet paper. Do you have plenty of it?

Re: This is true (1)

Salvador Spataro (3464327) | about 6 months ago | (#46314653)

It is true. I live in San Cristobal too. Internet was shutdown. Zello was blocked. Twitter images were blocked.

You do not have to believe me.
Check Zello on twitter. @ Zello . They issued and update on Android to bypass the block and updated unblockable versions are on review for ios and bb10.

Twitter confirmed the block:
http://news.softpedia.com/news... [softpedia.com]

Re:This is true (1)

ComputersKai (3499237) | about 6 months ago | (#46314345)

welp, i guess this is one not-so-secretive crude way to "quash" protest

just turn off internet access in stead of bothering with censorship

even if it means your country will be severely disadvantaged and all that...

Re:This is true (1)

epyT-R (613989) | about 6 months ago | (#46314371)

How are you using twitter if you don't have internet access?

Re: This is true (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46314417)

You say your internet was cut off... By posting on the internet?

Re: This is true (2)

cslibby (626565) | about 6 months ago | (#46314487)

You say your internet was cut off... By posting on the internet?

Please note, he said it was cut off for 36 Hours. He posted after the cutoff ended.

Re:This is true (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46314577)

What you're telling me is that while my country is at peace, we should make a deliberate transition to an internet that is not at all controlled by government so that it cannot be used to control us if the government becomes a problem for the people it governs.

I'm sorry for your issues and I hope you the best. Thanks for sharing your experience for us to learn from. If I could help in some way, I would.

Re:This is true (2)

CodeBuster (516420) | about 6 months ago | (#46314925)

How is it that Maduro and his allies can continue to persist with economic policies so patently stupid that even an undergraduate student of economics at any American or European university can predict and explain their inevitable failures? I mean bare supermarket shelves in a country with some of the largest oil reserves in the Southern Hemisphere? That's humiliating. How can Maduro possibly explain this with a straight face other than to admit that currency controls and confiscation of private property for redistribution to his supporters is not the way forward to economic prosperity? Don't they realize that the American and European financiers are laughing at them even now? What a bunch of balloon heads. Why don't Venezuelans living abroad, especially economists, call them out? A public shaming of Maduro and his cronies might achieve what street protests and violence have so far failed to deliver, a return to economic sanity in Venezuela.

Re:This is true (1)

johanw (1001493) | about 6 months ago | (#46314991)

Because those economic policies are dictated by different premises. Not "maximise the profit for the big companies and their managers" but "maximise the living standard for the poor". Not everyone likes that of course, perhaps he has underestimated the way the rich and the US are trying to sabotage his policy.

Re:This is true (2)

CodeBuster (516420) | about 6 months ago | (#46315007)

Who is hurt most by empty shelves at the supermarket or shortages of even such basic items as cooking oil, toilet paper and milk? Is it big business or the poor? As much as Maduro and the Chavistas would love to blame the US for "sabotaging" their socialist paradise, they have none but themselves to blame for the obvious harms visited upon the economy or the sufferings of ordinary Venezuelans in whose interests they claim to be acting.

Re:This is true (1)

johanw (1001493) | about 6 months ago | (#46315069)

And whose fault are those empty shelves? The US and the powerfull rich in Venezuele are actively sabotaging the country. Kilobug explains it nicely here: http://yro.slashdot.org/commen... [slashdot.org]

And for other examples, look at the economic blockade of Cuba by the US. The country is not threatening at all to the US but they have a different economic religion than the US has so the regime has to go.

Re: This is true (2)

xelah (176252) | about 6 months ago | (#46315225)

Because this sort of politics is not based on using rational understanding of the world to make good governmental decisions to achieve some goal, it's based on group dynamics. Look at how the US and 'saboteurs' are blamed for everything, and how people are prepared to attack others for mere membership or association with the other group. It's about orchestrating an us and a them, creating insiders to fight and to hate for you to defend your tribe, so the powerful can keep themselves there.

It seems like some people can't see politics or government any other way. Look at the partisan hatred in the US, or those who respond to climate change arguments by ignoring the science and concentrating on defining 'scientists' as a group and questioning their motivation. It's everywhere, from more benign forms to the extreme, from biology teaching in schools to traditional religious wars to nazism and the soviets, and extreme politicians always make it their weapon.

Coming soon to the USA (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46314129)

http://images.huffingtonpost.com/2009-04-21-ObamaChavez.jpg

And while Maduro murders Venezuelans... (3, Informative)

jmichaelg (148257) | about 6 months ago | (#46314147)

Re:And while Maduro murders Venezuelans... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46314941)

Who still pays attention to what Joe Kennedy has to say? The guy lost his marbles years ago.

The Internet cannot be shut down. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46314157)

It senses any attempt to do so as damage and routes around it.

Re:The Internet cannot be shut down. (5, Insightful)

cold fjord (826450) | about 6 months ago | (#46314197)

That doesn't really work for you if you are in the damaged / isolated area.

Re:The Internet cannot be shut down. (1)

epyT-R (613989) | about 6 months ago | (#46314377)

or in countries where the authoritarians demand an 'internet kill switch'.

Re:The Internet cannot be shut down. (2, Insightful)

Opportunist (166417) | about 6 months ago | (#46314811)

...like the US?

Re:The Internet cannot be shut down. (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46314223)

It senses any attempt to do so as damage and routes around it.

Yes, but with less bandwidth.

I use a private ISP (Intercable) and while my ping to www.google.com usually sits around 100 ms, now it's usually at 800 ms or so.

Now it might be backbones shutting down or it might just be that everyone is on youtube and twitter trying to get news and clogging the links.

There's also a lot of people recommending VPN apps for their computer or phone to get around censorship, others using zello or other apps to get news and communicate, and so on.

Funny this is what gets talked about rather than Maduro kicking CNN out of the country, the dead protesters or the armed 'non-government' supporters atttacking them. But hey, this is /. I guess.

Re:The Internet cannot be shut down. (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 6 months ago | (#46314349)

Funny this is what gets talked about rather than Maduro kicking CNN out of the country, the dead protesters or the armed 'non-government' supporters atttacking them. But hey, this is /. I guess.

If you care then you're seeing that stuff already. This, however, is news for nerds. I, for one, welcome our on-topic overlords. So long as they don't Beta me.

Re:The Internet cannot be shut down. (1)

dugancent (2616577) | about 6 months ago | (#46314381)

How do you route around damage if you have one way in and one way out?

Re:The Internet cannot be shut down. (1)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | about 6 months ago | (#46314853)

Pulling the plug at the ISP leaves you no place to route. Pulling the plug at the backbone might allow you to route within the portion of the internet on your side of the plug, except that your ISP may very well pull the plug at the same time.

You can try this yourself on a small scale. Go to your modem/router, and pull the plug. Unplug ALL the wires going into it. Few modems, if any, will continue to route WIFI - but even if it does, what are you going to get on your local network? It's highly doubtful that you can connect to Slashdot to refute my post. Those who are using an iPhone or similar to browse are ultimately using a wired connections somewhere between their phone and Slashdot. The government knows where that wired connection is, and government can cause that connection to be unplugged.

Man Shot To Death For Texting During Movie (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46314181)

Poor hams (2)

mattr (78516) | about 6 months ago | (#46314207)

So.. ham radio. Radio Club Venezolano. National Emergency Network. Satellite Dishes. ISS. Free hosting. Google... Facebook... friends.
There are probably a bunch of ways to get information in/out of Venezuela, at least in a one-way burst.
On the other hand http://www.yv5rcv.org/ [yv5rcv.org] tweets pane shows "Hmm, an empty timeline. That's wierd." Ouch.

Venezuela thinks it is Madagascar (2)

js3 (319268) | about 6 months ago | (#46314217)

Only Madagascar can shut down everything

Communists (1, Insightful)

snilloc (470200) | about 6 months ago | (#46314219)

They're Communists. This is their bag. Don't put communists in power. Full stop.

Mod parent up (-1, Troll)

Intrepid imaginaut (1970940) | about 6 months ago | (#46314229)

Hear hear. Take half an hour out of your life to watch this, it highlights the kind of person who started Marxism and by extension Communism, time well spent:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v... [youtube.com]

Re:Communists (1)

johanw (1001493) | about 6 months ago | (#46314999)

They'renot American cowboy-capitalists. That's something else as being communists, althoug it might be difficult to see for some rednecks who can only think one-digit binary.

a very bad decision (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46314221)

I don't know why incumbent governments ever think this is a valid why to curb public sentiment. In every single situation where they try to do this to control the population it does the exact opposite and incites them to get off their lazy bottoms and rebel. They must not realize that cutting off internet access also cuts off pornography which means you have a lot of angry frustrated men with some serious aggression to work out roaming the streets. It is the worst move I can imagine.

Re:a very bad decision (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46314233)

Best comment ever :D

Re:a very bad decision (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46314289)

They're also thinking, "OH I get it. Now it affects me. This government has to go!"

Re:a very bad decision (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46314383)

True, because those men are likely married to feminist women who are too 'empowered' to commit to their marriages.

Re:a very bad decision (1)

tsa (15680) | about 6 months ago | (#46314753)

When your government shuts down the internet you're sure they are there for themselves and not the people.

Ask Slashdot: What Does Edward Snowden Deserve? (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46314225)

AMA (2)

Saúl González D. (3429883) | about 6 months ago | (#46314251)

I'm from Venezuela. Ask me anything. :)

Most of what you may want to ask is probably already covered here, tho: http://caracaschronicles.com/2... [caracaschronicles.com]

BTW, full Internet shutdown seems to be in effect only in San Cristobal. In most other places, you can bypass the blocks by using the Tor Browser.

Re:AMA (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 6 months ago | (#46314495)

Thank you.

Ok you naysayers, this is what /. is good for. Along with recycled jokes and car analogies of course.

Re:AMA (1)

johanw (1001493) | about 6 months ago | (#46315079)

So, that's some prejudiced site. To quote:

"Was Maduro fairly elected?

No. Maduro’s party, PSUV, relies heavily on state resources to fund and execute their campaigns"

Does not looks any worse than the US president election, where those who can get the most money from their followers (who expect something in return) gets elected. At least Maduro got the majority of votes, unlike required in some other "democratic" systems.

Re:AMA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46315193)

But you left off "Additionally, many irregularities were reported prior, during and after the election: coercion, threats and manipulation of the voting machines." So if that's true then "No" is correct.

Follow the money (0)

Livius (318358) | about 6 months ago | (#46314261)

Who would benefit most from disruption of Internet service in Venezuela?

(Hint: Not the Venezuelan government.)

Re:Follow the money (3, Insightful)

Saúl González D. (3429883) | about 6 months ago | (#46314295)

The Venezuelan regime treats every problem as a nail to be hammered, so it THINKS the Internet shutdown will help them. And if the OAS and the rest of the Latin American governments don't see this as "crossing the line" and start treating Maduro like the tyrant he is, the regime might as well be right.

I have no idea of what other party are you implying might benefit? Is Google expanding Fiber to South America?

Re:Follow the money (2)

hjf (703092) | about 6 months ago | (#46314457)

The rest of the latin american governments, except Chile and maybe Paraguay are controlled by "socialists". Argentina has expressed "full support" for Maduro's governent. Ridiculous, really.

Re:Follow the money (3, Insightful)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about 6 months ago | (#46314641)

The rest of the latin american governments, except Chile and maybe Paraguay are controlled by "socialists".

Colombia and Mexico are both run by right-of-center governments (at least by Latin American standards). Both are firmly anti-Maduro, especially Colombia, since Venezuela has actively supported the FARC guerrillas operating inside Colombia.

Re:Follow the money (1)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | about 6 months ago | (#46314863)

http://www.borderlandbeat.com/ [borderlandbeat.com]

Mexico is not run by the government. Mexico's government uses a corrupt military and police force in an attempt to make a show of running the country, but it isn't working.

Re:Follow the money (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46314555)

> Maduro like the tyrant he is

How is he a tyrant when he was elected? Also, the representatives that were elected gave him dictator powers. Unless you hate Democracies and rights, how can you be against that? Well, unless you're a Republican and think on the rich and powerful should have the right to vote.

Re:Follow the money (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46314611)

Hitler was elected. Being elected doesn't mean you aren't a tyrant.

Re:Follow the money (1)

tsa (15680) | about 6 months ago | (#46314761)

Janoekovitschj also seemed to have forgotten that yesterday.

Re:Follow the money (1)

johanw (1001493) | about 6 months ago | (#46315083)

He was elected in a deeply divided country with 2 almost equal groups opposinbg each other. That's almost guaranteed to lead to instability.

Re:Follow the money (1)

MightyMartian (840721) | about 6 months ago | (#46314651)

Getting elected in a country governed by a constitution and the rule of law shouldn't allow you t do anything you want. The problem in places like Venezuela and Ukraine is that the elected seem to believe that getting a plurality of votes legitimises any and all future actions.

Venezuela's democracy seems.paper thin to me.

Re:Follow the money (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about 6 months ago | (#46314837)

Well, if their election process at least ensures that the one to be prez gets the plurality of the votes they're already a step ahead from some other countries...

Re:Follow the money (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46314885)

Getting elected in a country governed by a constitution and the rule of law shouldn't allow you t do anything you want. The problem in places like Venezuela and Ukraine is that the elected seem to believe that getting a plurality of votes legitimises any and all future actions.

Venezuela's democracy seems.paper thin to me.

The government doing what every it wants, as long as the majority approve, is precisely what democracy is.

Democracy and freedom are not the same thing.

Re:Follow the money (2)

psmears (629712) | about 6 months ago | (#46314865)

The Venezuelan regime treats every problem as a nail to be hammered, so it THINKS the Internet shutdown will help them.

I was in Egypt when the government shut down the internet for several days to prevent protests, prior to the ousting of Mubarak. It was a very short-sighted move: to a great extent, the only thing keeping a lot of people off the streets was Facebook - take that away, and people's only option (for information and/or entertainment) is to go outside...

Re:Follow the money (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46314403)

I bet Obama's doing it. Venezuela did offer Snowden citizenship.

Re:Follow the money (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 6 months ago | (#46314505)

I bet Obama's doing it. Venezuela did offer Snowden citizenship.

No, Obama is responsible for climate change and the Kennedy assassination.

Get it straight.

Additional Cuban troops arrived too (1)

schwit1 (797399) | about 6 months ago | (#46314305)

https://pjmedia.com/ronradosh/... [pjmedia.com]

Maduro wants no possibility of an Arab spring or Ukraine revolt

Re:Additional Cuban troops arrived too (1)

Mashiki (184564) | about 6 months ago | (#46314749)

What I find quite interesting is how the media is *really* pushing hard on anything Ukraine related, but is damned quiet on anything relating to Venezuela.

Re:Additional Cuban troops arrived too (1)

ruir (2709173) | about 6 months ago | (#46315279)

They are quiet until they are sure of the outcome. They dont want to broadcast a possible revolution live.

Re:Additional Cuban troops arrived too (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46315325)

What I find quite interesting is how the media is *really* pushing hard on anything Ukraine related, but is damned quiet on anything relating to Venezuela.

In the US, it has always been like this. Ukraine is connected to European issues, and ex-Soviet conflicts. Venezuela is connected to South America, and it is only known for producing drugs or vacations.

(Incidentally, I met a guy from Colombia once... he said that he avoided planes whenever possible, because everything gets searched every time he goes anywhere, and that's not just in the US, but in Europe, or, .... So next time that you think TSA is hard on you....)

Re:Additional Cuban troops arrived too (1)

CodeBuster (516420) | about 6 months ago | (#46314973)

Maduro wants no possibility of an Arab spring or Ukraine revolt

Cutting off the Internet didn't save the pre-revolution Egyptian Government and it won't save Maduro either. It's a sign of weakness.

The horrible life of Stephen King! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46314385)

I have been reading Slashdot over the past couple of weeks and have put together a list of all of the horrible things that have happened to Stephen King! It is truly awful! In the past two weeks, he has been:

Now that's an American icon!

Pay Attention (1)

The Cat (19816) | about 6 months ago | (#46314411)

Because the more mergers our bought-off government allows, the closer we will be to an off-switch here.

Cuba...redoux (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46314575)

Maduro, the new Nikita Castro ;) What a fool, they will cut his balls off and drag him through the streets before this is all over. Wanna be Commie dictator will get his.

dont think it can't happen in your country (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46314609)

all governments will do this if they feel threatened

the 99% need a communication network that is out of the control of governments and corporations, and the way to do this is with mesh networks that are easy enough to use that "normal people" can do it without the help of geeks

we aren't there yet but some people are working on it, and hopefully a truly "public" internet is in place soon, one that no government or corporation can shutdown not matter how badly they want to

Beware of the media manipulations (1, Informative)

Kilobug (213978) | about 6 months ago | (#46314905)

So, a handful of people (the recent "protests" were in the number of hundreds, maybe a few thousands at most, nothing of a big and massive popular protest, as Venezuela had in the past, with both opposition and chavistas massing hundred of thousands, even millions) violently protest, attack public infrastructure (city halls, metro stations, hospitals, ...). People are killed - not by the police, but by the protesters, most of the death are _chavistas_ not opposition.

Then, the opposition start a massive media manipulation, with photos and videos of repression taken from all around the world (Chile, Spain, Greece, ...) pretending it's the Venezuelan government doing it. All the western media jump on that, and without a single second of critical thinking, claim Maduro is repressing.

And now, some governmental Internet links have problem functioning. It must be Maduro doing censorship ! From France, I've troubles reaching many Venezuela government sites, like VTV (state TV) website, or CanTV (public operator) website. Why would Maduro censor his own sites ? Especially VTV ! And why would he cut CanTV, while it's just one operator among many, especially on mobile Internet (and most people in Venezuela, especially among the opposition, have a cell phone) ? It just doesn't make sense.

Couldn't it be that the violent protests damaged the infrastructure ? Couldn't it be that the Venezuela opposition, which is _very_ rich (they have the 1% among them, and they get massive funding from the US), is doing some DDoS or similar attack on CanTV ? Couldn't it be a sabotage, from opposition workers inside CanTV, or from abroad ? I should remind you that during the 2003 oil "strike" in Venezuela, the US corporation that handled the computer systems of PDVSA (state oil company in Venezuela) sabotaged them, just to add to the chaos and create the conditions for a military coup.

Given all this past and all those facts, shouldn't we wait until the exact reasons of the (very partial) shutdown of CanTV services are known before yelling "censorship" or "dictatorship" ? Because that's exactly what the Venezuelan extreme-right wants us to do, and it's not the first time they would manipulate media and perform false flag attacks to do it (remember the events of 2002, where the opposition killed people, blamed Chávez to justify a coup).

USA needs to go in an fix things (1)

greggster (1712144) | about 6 months ago | (#46315035)

We should march in there and setup democracy just like we did for Iraq. Then we gun down "terrorists", and finally make friends with the government as our Oil Tankers are pulling up to the docks.

All of their problems are part of the one issue (1)

Karmashock (2415832) | about 6 months ago | (#46315145)

That government has to go... Chavez and those he brought into power are a cancer.

And they can either cut it out or rot.

Up to them to decide and do the deed one way or the other. But I'm done feeling sorry for people that don't fight oppression in their own backyard.

censorship long-term effects (1)

lkcl (517947) | about 6 months ago | (#46315195)

it will be interesting to see and learn what the long-term economic and social effects of these censorship attempts are. the effect of censorship is not just going to cut off the "pruhtesters", it'll cut off researchers from access to papers and equipment, businesses from the customers and suppliers, and, additionally, cut off government departments within venezuela from effective communication with each other in the day-to-day operations. looking further ahead i look forward to seeing whether other governments find this lesson useful or not.

Days of the Dictator are Ending (2)

BoRegardless (721219) | about 6 months ago | (#46315253)

False information and no information to people in a country (ala the old Pravda in the USSR) as a means of achieving a politically repressive end is coming to a close.

Cuba, Ukraine and Venezuela are the proving grounds to show that governments can no longer keep the free will of the populace from exerting itself.

But the old dictators will hold on until they are thrown out. It could still take decades in some places where the dictatorship is effectively run by the military and they are the true power, like N. Korea.

The trend of history is clear over the last 150 years as countries have moved to freer and freer elections. The king is dead.

one whole heck (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | about 6 months ago | (#46315283)

one whole heck

I was only expecting half a heck.

How many shedloads is that?

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