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NSA Hacked Huawei, Stole Source Code

timothy posted about 7 months ago | from the whose-line-is-it-anyway dept.

China 287

Charliemopps (1157495) writes "New documents from Snowden indicate that the NSA hacked into and stole documents, including source code, from the Chinese networking firm Huawei. Ironically, this is the same firm that the U.S. government has argued in the past was a threat due to China's possible use of the same sort of attacks."

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No irony (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554243)

That's probably how the US govt knows Huawei is a threat...

Wow !! (0)

Taco Cowboy (5327) | about 7 months ago | (#46554339)

Let's say I robbed you, and because of that, I found that you've got a gun.

And because of that, *YOU* are dangerous !!!

You, Sir, have a weird sense of humor !

Re:Wow !! (5, Funny)

binarylarry (1338699) | about 7 months ago | (#46554491)

Huawei so serious?

Re:Wow !! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554601)

Yes. The NSA does no do this for entertainment or commercial purpose. This is the force of a major power being used to augment the industrial military might. This is just one facet of what really goes on not what you think goes on.

Re:Wow !! (1)

MobSwatter (2884921) | about 7 months ago | (#46554653)

Anyone seeing here why the TPP trade deal might not be such a good idea after all? Then again over the last 20 years you've all see the dollar that was with 5 Canadian to 1 US go 1 for 1. Your paying 5 bucks a gallon for gas and almost as much for milk. Warning signs? What warning signs..? We'll be having are dollar even with the peso in the middle of a zombie apocalypse, and the news will still be telling everyone that everything is okay...

Re:Wow !! (1)

Jmc23 (2353706) | about 7 months ago | (#46554731)

Um, nice revisionist history there. Unfortunately reality and the internet disagree with you.

Re:Wow !! (1)

MobSwatter (2884921) | about 7 months ago | (#46554783)

Well at least someone stands up and takes credit for all that.

Re:Wow !! (1)

thebigmacd (545973) | about 7 months ago | (#46554913)

Uh...yeah...no

The lowest the Canadian dollar has ever been was 61.79 cents US.

Re:Wow !! (1)

MobSwatter (2884921) | about 7 months ago | (#46555039)

Yep, my bad, you are right. That was the exchange I got at a store up there for a pack of smokes while on vacation paying with US dollars, nice to have made out like a bandit at one point. Still even at that, it was 1.62CAN/1.00US, now it's 1.12CAN/1.00US.

Re:Wow !! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554591)

That is not humor. We are dangerous and we accept no threat to exist.

Re:No irony (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554479)

The US Gov has never articulated exactly how Huawei is a threat with any specificity. The NSA slides don't give any information either. Nothing released to the public has shown that Huawei was ever guilty of any of the things said about them, but on the other hand, the US Gov itself is guilty as hell as far as engaging in the sort of tactics we've accused Huawei of.

Re:No irony (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554483)

and the rest of the world is learning how untrustworthy the USA is.

Re:No irony (1, Funny)

MrBigInThePants (624986) | about 7 months ago | (#46554569)

If you needed to learn that by now then you have not been paying attention....

Re:No irony (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554683)

The majority of the world does not pay attention, they're happy and complacent with TV and porn.

Re:No irony (2)

MrBigInThePants (624986) | about 7 months ago | (#46554807)

I totally agree with your statement but in this context "the rest of the world" was mainly referring to the leaders of other countries.

The couch vegetables don't count when discussing these issues. What they think only ever matters once every few years at voting time and what they think can be easily installed with scandal, BS and appealing to their bias - so not that much at all really.

Those that are not the vege type are too small in number to matter as a group.

You can call me a foolish cynic all you want but I will hold up the entirety of the global political sphere as a counter example and we shall see who is the more foolish! :)

Re:No irony (4, Interesting)

Jmc23 (2353706) | about 7 months ago | (#46554587)

No, that's how the US government found out huawei was too hard to hack so they tried to discredit them publicly to get companies to buy equipment to which they had easy access to.

You know, just like trying to discredit PGP.

Re:No irony (1)

hackus (159037) | about 7 months ago | (#46555043)

You ar ecorrect.

Without Industrial Espionage, the Elite can never hold on to their power.

Threats must be identified and neutralized, primarily through the stealing of industrial secrets to insure the Federal Reserve note is secure world wide.

Re:No irony (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46555067)

Yes, this is maybe true that they stole it to confirm suspicions. Maybe it is more tit-for-tat between the big players.

On the other hand, isn't this the way the US and "West" operate? "Everyone, look at [insert bad thing here] over in [insert target country]! Terrible, we must do something!" Meanwhile, back at home, the same or 3x worse is going on. Here are some pairs of things to put in those brackets:

IP stealing :: China
racism :: South Africa
dangerous weapons & madmen in control :: Iraq, Afghanistan

FP (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554251)

FP

Personal Liberty! (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554253)

Wait,... isn't this the purpose of the NSA?

Re:Personal Liberty! (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554747)

Wait,... isn't this the purpose of the NSA?

Yep, if Snowden continues along this path he is moving into 'Traitor" territory. I only support him because he releases information on Domestic spying - this is completely within the realm of a FIA.

Re:Personal Liberty! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554761)

Wait,... isn't this the purpose of the NSA?

Yep, if Snowden continues along this path he is moving into 'Traitor" territory. I only support him because he releases information on Domestic spying - this is completely within the realm of a FIA.

Seconded. I'd mod you up if I didn't already comment.

Re:Personal Liberty! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554939)

I'd mod you up if I could. He stated and restated and then stated again that his aim was not to hurt America, but to inform the public about the things NSA does domestically.

Clear he's gone way, way beyond that with recent revelations. American companies have been hurt to the tune of billions of dollars. US intelligent efforts overseas have been crippled.

Re:Personal Liberty! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554953)

Last time I checked, we are not at war with china. Spying on our trading partners like this hurts the whole nation.

Re:Personal Liberty! (5, Informative)

shutdown -p now (807394) | about 7 months ago | (#46554957)

Snowden isn't releasing anything. He just dumped what he had on some journalists; they are the ones doing these slow staged releases.

Re:Personal Liberty! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46555091)

When you knowingly enable others to do something, you are accepting some responsibility for what they will do.

Re:Personal Liberty! (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46555003)

Y'know what? Fuck you. This whole 'outrage over domenstic activity, but foreign-spying is a-ok' attitude has got to stop.

I'm not American. The notion a foreign power can root through my data, without my or my governments consent, with no repercussions and the full support of people like you, is abhorrent to me.

Traitor? The man becomes more of a hero with every tidbit like this he releases. A Hero to the rest of us. Because you no longer count.

Re:Personal Liberty! (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554769)

Just as much as it is the job of the army to invade foreign countries and kill their people. Unless we're actively at war with that country, then no, they shouldn't be doing it, and it is an illegal act of aggression. That, and I'm not really sure how a company that isn't involved in anything military should be considered any different from a civilian; NSA doesn't give a fuck about any boundaries.

Plus, might I remind you, the NSA is also attacking American citizens.

Act of war... according to US (5, Insightful)

jma05 (897351) | about 7 months ago | (#46555027)

> Wait,... isn't this the purpose of the NSA?

According to US government, hacking communication infrastructure of a country by another government is an "act of war", not regular espionage. They said this very loudly just before Snowden revelations began. So NO. They are not supposed to be doing that.

pot/kettle storyline (1)

turkeydance (1266624) | about 7 months ago | (#46554259)

but include the little teapot.

Good for NSA (0, Troll)

Lacompa Cida (3396233) | about 7 months ago | (#46554261)

That's what they were paid for. Good job, NSA.

Re:Good for NSA (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554285)

The job of the NSA is to gack foreign companies and steal their source code?
Interesting to say the least, do you have a source for this information, as I'm sure several governments would be interested.

Re:Good for NSA (1)

fustakrakich (1673220) | about 7 months ago | (#46554393)

The job of the NSA is to gack foreign companies and steal their source code?

Many of the "jobs" of the NSA are classified. It is perfectly plausible that this would be one of them. Since there is no oversight, we should always assume the worse. Chances are they will have gone well beyond whatever you can possibly dream up.

Re:Good for NSA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554631)

Yes and much much more. Not just a foreign company eh? A company deliberately installing back doors to the world wide Internet. These are not home routers. You want you company or nation to use these routers? I am sure ever nation and corporation on earth is interested. Many are wondering what that back door access is. Now that it is common knowledge the shader side of life will be all over it.

Re:Good for NSA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554671)

Wasn't Huawei the beneficiary of source code from Cisco?
I can't remember if it was stolen or if the President at the time gave it to the Chinese Government.

Re:Good for NSA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554971)

The job of the NSA is to gack foreign companies and steal their source code?

Well, it's a damn sight better than having them hack American companies in order to compromise the security of Americans' communications, which is what they seem to have been more interested in doing since 2001.

Re:Good for NSA (5, Insightful)

khasim (1285) | about 7 months ago | (#46554297)

No. Huawei is a commercial company. Not a government.

This is our government engaging in corporate espionage.

Re:Good for NSA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554351)

Huawei is a commercial company. Not a government.

I guess you missed the part where it's in China. Communist/fascist regimes don't have distinctions like that.

Corporate espionage would be giving the code to American companies, or selling something based on it.

Re:Good for NSA (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554423)

I guess you missed the part where it's in China. Communist/fascist regimes don't have distinctions like that.

Neither do US corporations either... Microsoft, Google, Apple, Yahoo, RSA & others all collect data for the NSA.

Re:Good for NSA (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554435)

The US government and the big US commercial companies behaves as one giant blob of corruption though.
The richest and most powerful 1% in china wants exactly the same as the 1% in the US. Same shit.

Re:Good for NSA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554507)

"Corporate espionage would be giving the code to American companies, or selling something based on it."

And who is to say they are not doing this.

What you are suggesting is that the person who just burgled your home will not steal your wallet.

Re:Good for NSA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554643)

Strangely enough I have had careful burglars before. You know nothing of how strange reality is.

Re:Good for NSA (2)

plover (150551) | about 7 months ago | (#46554709)

When China engages in spying on corporate America, they spy on companies like Valspar for the formula the US Navy uses to protect warships from rust. They then give that information to Chinese firms to make durable paint for their own navy, and to turn a huge profit.

When the NSA spies on Huawei, they use the information to discover vulnerabilities they then go on to internally use to exploit the infrastructure of those who use them. They do not give the information to Cisco in order to make more efficient American routers (that are then made in China.).

So China uses industrial espionage to strengthen their military and economy. The NSA uses industrial espionage to weaken the security of everyone equally.

See the difference? Me neither.

Re:Good for NSA (1)

oldhack (1037484) | about 7 months ago | (#46554845)

Right, "commercial company" in the commie CPC empire. What planet do you live on?

Re:Good for NSA (2)

cold fjord (826450) | about 7 months ago | (#46554335)

That's what they were paid for. Good job, NSA.

Yes, but that sort of thing tends to be more valuable when it isn't publicized.

Re:Good for NSA (3)

jovius (974690) | about 7 months ago | (#46554443)

So NSA does its job by stealing documents from China. Chinese do their job by stealing documents from the US. Snowden as a whistleblower does his job by exposing the documents. Its win-win-win for all.

Re:Good for NSA (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554471)

Make sure you cheer and support foreign governments that steals American trade secrets and information too. After all industrial espionage is just doing there job right.

Re:Good for NSA (5, Insightful)

AmiMoJo (196126) | about 7 months ago | (#46554537)

That's what they were paid for. Good job, NSA.

Except that they just undermined their government's protests and Chinese hacking. Unlike US allegations against China which are pretty thin the Chinese now have concrete evidence of international law-breaking and industrial espionage against them. Expect it to be used against the US at the WTO and whenever the US tries to make any complaints about hacking in the future.

It will be interesting to see how the US government tries to spin this. They said in the past that hacking could be considered an act of war, retaliated against with conventional weapons as well as cyberattacks. It's pretty much open season on the US now, and you can expect to see virus attacks on US infrastructure in the future. All thanks to the NSA.

Re:Good for NSA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554753)

It will be interesting to see how the US government tries to spin this.

I would expect the same way they spin every other times when they were being hypocrites? First keep yelling as if they didn't do it themselves, then claiming their version was different, and finally do what they want anyway, backed with military force if needed.

This kind of shit comes out from the US every year if you paid attention to look for it (e.g. by not watching only US news sources).

Re:Good for NSA (5, Funny)

ark1 (873448) | about 7 months ago | (#46554833)

It will be interesting to see how the US government tries to spin this.

"It was not theft, it was copyright infringement."

Re:Good for NSA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554561)

That's what they were paid for. Good job, NSA.

Agreed. The US government should show reciprocity to the actions of China. I am perfectly okay with this. Surprised this is being presented as some sort of major scandal. Seems like most of the recent leeks haven't shown anything illegal or shocking, but I guess Glenn Greenwald wants to cash out his 15 minutes of fame for as long as possible.

Re:Good for NSA (1)

TheOldestGit (859438) | about 7 months ago | (#46554817)

Well thanks for that NSA - keeping the new network where I live properly security vetted ;-) [I happen to live in the Isle of Man where the the new LTE stuff is being done with these (invisible) guys] NB We had the first 3G network in Europe & the Japanese engineers were everywhere for development

New TED with ED (1)

Dj Stingray (178766) | about 7 months ago | (#46554267)

... on the youtube. It's going to be hard to find, for obvious reasons. Here is a link.

Edward Snowden: Here's how we take back the Internet
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yVwAodrjZMY

No surprise (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554289)

None at all.

NSA validated in their concerns? (5, Interesting)

saps1e (560653) | about 7 months ago | (#46554293)

So if they have access to the source code, does this mean that the NSA is speaking authoritatively when they say Huawei's routers do have backdoors for the Chinese govt?

Re:NSA validated in their concerns? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554395)

If so, the NSA probably put them there and the Chinese just found them.

Re:NSA validated in their concerns? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554403)

What the NSA is saying is that they get into people's networks by hacking networking gear, and so does the Chinese version of the NSA. Presumably the Chinese have ample opportunity to steal Huawei source code and find some flaws in it.

There's no need to build in a back door on purpose. Any exploit is a back door. Building products without "back doors" is incredibly difficult. Yes, China could intentionally back door Huawei products... this doesn't mean it does, but more importantly, it's entirely academic whether they find exploits the old fashioned way or plant them.

The organization I work for has Huawei gear and does code audits on it. There is no line specifically marked "back door". There's also no reason to believe that Huawei products are less secure than other stuff on the market. If anything, if the NSA is bitching about Huawei gear, it's almost an endorsement of its security.

Re:NSA validated in their concerns? (1)

AHuxley (892839) | about 7 months ago | (#46554515)

More like the NSA did not want kit on the open market that was not as easy as US and EU products for next gen DISCOROUTE, QUANTUM like options.
"NSA targets sysadmin personal accounts to exploit networks" (March 21, 2014)
http://www.zdnet.com/nsa-targe... [zdnet.com]
i.e. a long list of ways in shared with 5+ other nations, their contractors, ex staff, former staff.
Anyone able to afford contractors, ex staff, former staff for the methods gets in too :)
Thats the problem with weak global security in any networking product - too many people know too much via gov and contracting work over the installed lifetime of any telco product.

Huawei source code (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554295)

#include

In all seriousness, it's a pretty roundabout way to get one's Linux build. What did YOU think was inside those boxes?

Retaliation is fair game (1, Interesting)

hessian (467078) | about 7 months ago | (#46554309)

The Chinese have been hacking American military stuff since the 1980s.

Not only that, they were the source of the vast majority of the weapons used against us in the Vietnam war, and fought directly against us in Korea.

They're bad guys.

Re:Retaliation is fair game (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554361)

they were the source of the vast majority of the weapons used against us in the Vietnam war, and fought directly against us in Korea.

They're bad guys.

...And they won both of the wars. Which means you guys are losers and they are winners, not "bad guys".

Re: Retaliation is fair game (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554379)

Bad guys? Really? They're bad? And guys!? You sound like a child, wandering into the middle of a movie....

Re:Retaliation is fair game (2)

Jmc23 (2353706) | about 7 months ago | (#46554397)

Remind us again why the US was there in the first place.

Fucking kool-aid drinkers.

Re:Retaliation is fair game (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554589)

Remind us again why the US was there in the first place.

Fucking kool-aid drinkers.

It was part of a Cold War era foreign policy strategy called "containment". It led to some controversial things such as the Vietnam war, but it was effective at stopping the Soviet Union from conquering more territory.

The USSR was fail (4, Insightful)

hessian (467078) | about 7 months ago | (#46555051)

It led to some controversial things such as the Vietnam war, but it was effective at stopping the Soviet Union from conquering more territory.

Which, given what a social, political, environmental and cultural wasteland the Communists left behind wherever they gained authority, was a justifiable and in fact laudable goal.

Re:Retaliation is fair game (5, Insightful)

YukariHirai (2674609) | about 7 months ago | (#46554421)

Merely fighting against America does not necessarily make them bad guys, in a reasonably objective sense. If you are American, then anyone fighting against you would seem to be bad guys from your point of view, but from an outsider's point of view, it's just "these guys" and "these other guys".

Some might argue that them hacking makes them bad guys by some measure, but the US has been doing the same thing, so I'd consider that inconclusive at best and hypocrisy at worst. Others might argue that the stuff done to Americans during the Vietnam War makes them bad guys, but given everything done by the Americans during the Vietnam War... well, same conclusion.

With that said of course, the Chinese government has had a history of doing some very shitty things to a lot of people. On the other hand, so has the US government...

Re:Retaliation is fair game (2)

the eric conspiracy (20178) | about 7 months ago | (#46554837)

Right.

However I have some Chinese friends who aren't too happy with the history of their government. The remember things like relatives being bundled off to the provinces to never be seen again.

Remember the empty chair.

http://www.economist.com/blogs... [economist.com]

America has plenty of problems but....

Re:Retaliation is fair game (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554965)

> Merely fighting against America does not necessarily make them bad guys, in a reasonably objective sense. If you are American, then anyone fighting against you would seem to be bad guys from your point of view, but from an outsider's point of view, it's just "these guys" and "these other guys".

If your country is a member of NATO, or the EU, or has a US military base, you are effectively Americans as far as geopolitics goes. China and Russia are the last two major powers outside of that, so there is no such thing as an uninterested third party when the eagle mixes it up with the bear and dragon.

Re:Retaliation is fair game (2)

frist (1441971) | about 7 months ago | (#46554973)

There is no comparison my friend. You need to read about the glorious peoples' revolution in china. You need to read about 30 million people dying to famine because of Mao. When people compare the USA with China or the Soviet Union, it just shows how ignorant they are of history.

Re:Retaliation is fair game (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554647)

No ideas where you had your informations but even VPA soldiers said that they don't like China-made weapons, and prevented use them as possible.
WTF stuffs you read!?

Russian made + some domestic weapons were used by VPA.
American made captured weapons + handcrafted mine/bomb/gun made from America stuffs were used by VC.

Re:Retaliation is fair game (2)

AHuxley (892839) | about 7 months ago | (#46554695)

Why was "military stuff" near any vast fast public networks? What contractor or gov worker would connect a site, factory, base, supply system to a public network for anyone to 'try' for from some competing or hostile distant nation? Thats why most wealthy nations had dedicated hardened networks and very skilled staff. Only poor nations used their own low quality civilian like telco systems for encoded mill use.
i.e. you get into a typing pool or low security mil network or its a massive well crafted honeypot.
i.e. after the first few attempts by other nations to 'look' at the more secret networks - would steps be taken to remove or not connect military stuff from easy public networks with suspect international access?
If the US was so good on the offensive part as we are now understanding via whistleblowers and the US press the hardened/secure parts would have been as impressive over decades?
So expect the stories of mass 'military stuff' been lost via huge open fast public networks interfacing with fast not secure mil networks to be propaganda, a domestic recruiting tool (get a smart well paying mil job to help save the nations networks), extra funding stories of local political leaders (boondoggles) or junk science that could be lost with no risk.
The US had a total mastery of getting into other nations networks globally but much less understanding in not connecting its own real data to the same fast open junk public/academic/telco networks?
Expect honeypots, ended projects, altered work and disinformation to have been found at the end of most "hacking military stuff" - good enough to keep another nation best occupied/spending for years and follow back the hackers networks but not anything too useful.

Huawei source code, take 2 (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554311)

#include "cisco.h"

sigh...

Re:Huawei source code, take 2 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554439)

Yeah, meanwhile over at cisco;-

#include linux.h

The jokes on you NSA (4, Informative)

140Mandak262Jamuna (970587) | about 7 months ago | (#46554325)

Huawei had stolen the code from Cisco. So it is no big loss for them. They are laughing at NSA for not getting the source from the source.

Re: The jokes on you NSA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554373)

they just wanted to run diff -u

Re: The jokes on you NSA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554385)

And the NSA is laughing because it was Cisco's backdoored code that let them in.

NSA validates the right to steal source code (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554497)

That's not the only joke on the NSA.

An even bigger one is that they have now validated and condoned stealing source code as an acceptable activity. The legal ramifications of this are immense. The comedy value is just icing on the cake.

Re:NSA validates the right to steal source code (1)

Jmc23 (2353706) | about 7 months ago | (#46554593)

and IP doesn't matter!!

Re:NSA validates the right to steal source code (4, Funny)

sconeu (64226) | about 7 months ago | (#46554917)

IPv4 or IPv6?

Re:NSA validates the right to steal source code (1)

Jmc23 (2353706) | about 7 months ago | (#46554947)

You're in the wrong namespace. Try and focus on the thread.

Re:NSA validates the right to steal source code (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554677)

What is the legality of war? What is it to kill without limit. You think this is a comedy? WTF do you think the NSA is? The reason we won WWII? Almost certainly.

Re:NSA validates the right to steal source code (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554739)

>The legal ramifications of this are immense.

Not really. Two words:

Sovereign Immunity.

Too slow (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554363)

Instead of trickling these reports out one at a time, it would have been far better to take the time to vet them and release them all together. I'm very afraid the effect of dripping these out one drop at a time will be to dilute the public's interest and outrage.

No he did the right thing (2)

future assassin (639396) | about 7 months ago | (#46554401)

He releases in between Dancing With the Starts to catch people attention before they go back to the next reality tv show.

Re:Too slow (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554521)

No, its giving people time to digest how morally corrupt the USA. And each new revelation is another reminder that with dealing with the USA you best keep a close eye on your wallet.

Re:Too slow (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554543)

The group Snowden worked with is trying to keep in in the public eye by trickling it out. They've obviously failed because the latest "revelations" are being greeted with deafening silence. His 15 minutes of fame are over.

Re:Too slow (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46555001)

You're still paying attention, though, I see.

Re:Too slow (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554563)

If you do it all as one big hit the impact while large will wither rather quickly. Far better to constantly pound and pound them with how corrupt they are by providing constant proof.

In Soviet style USA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554399)

Everybody and everything is a threat to the current regime.

Round and round we go (1)

grub (11606) | about 7 months ago | (#46554431)


So, in essence, the NSA stole the stuff Huawei originally stole from Canada's Nortel.

Re:Round and round we go (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554525)

The title of your comment occurs in this song that I like:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZCTDKLjdok4

Enjoy!

NEWS FLASH !! THIS IS HOW THEY KNOW !! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554453)

They know WhoWhy is dirty because they stole the source !! Look to the source !! Look to the source !! Besides this is what they get paid to do !! Getting caught IN PUBLIC by TRAIDER "Have I got somthing for you" Snowden changes nothing !!

Industrial espionage to profit US companies (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554531)

It is a well know sideline of the NSA, GCHQ and intelligence agencies of other major nations to use their spying, blackmail and actual murder functions to enhance the success of domestic companies (the ones that place such large amounts of elicit cash into the bank-accounts of major domestic politicians) over foreign rivals. In days of EXPLICIT empire (like, say, the British Empire), foreign rivals weren't even allowed to compete at all. In our modern world, where most of the world is supposed to be a free market, the degree of dirty tricks used is just astonishing.

With the USA, it gets so very much worse. The insincere hand wringing over the use of bribery by big US concerns in the 70s and 80s led to US laws that make illegal the main methods by which US companies win foreign contracts. So, by definition in the USA, criminal acts to win business MUST be counted as part of the ABOVE THE LAW action-set of the NSA, CIA and similar agencies. Microsoft, for instance, spends billions each year bribing foreign figures of influence. But Microsoft also works as a front-line partner of the NSA, granting Microsoft complete immunity for all the crimes it carries out in non-US territories.

The principle is not dis-similar from the current US scandal about the State that grants its policemen the ABOVE THE LAW 'right' to sleep with prostitutes "in the course of their duty". The obscene idea of ATTACHED IMMUNITY is a long-standing one in the USA.

Led by US action, Huawei has been blocked from doing significant business in all nations under Obama's influence, in a low-level act of war against China. Now, with Obama's neo-Nazi coup in the Ukraine, and the fall out as majority Russia districts demand a return to Russian rule, we see the same tactics moved to a MUCH hotter level, as Obama initiates similar actions against major Russian entities.

Yeah whatever (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554669)

it's not going to change anything... The NSA can do whatever the hell they want, a indent think they give a shout if it's leaked because the most people will do is hand weave haha

NSA (1)

giorgist (1208992) | about 7 months ago | (#46554797)

Tell us what you know !!! Information wants to be free

Entertaining quote (1)

phantomfive (622387) | about 7 months ago | (#46554825)

From the article:

NSA workers not only succeeded in accessing the email archive, but also the secret source code of individual Huwaei products. Software source code is the holy grail of computer companies.

I just had a brilliant idea! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46554903)

Couldn't BSA or someone like that take the NSA to court for copyright infringement?
We all know that piracy is stealing right? And NSA stole huwaeis IP and infringing on others IP is pretty much the worst thing ever according to the MAFIAA and totally justifies confiscation of all your hardware to be searched through for copyrighted materials.
Kinda like how the government took down Capone for tax evasion.

(I realise that this is very naive and would never happen in real life, but it was a nice little daydream)

China vs NSA. (1)

porky_pig_jr (129948) | about 7 months ago | (#46555023)

Repeat after me: China = bad! NSA = good!

HuaWei's code is crap (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46555073)

I have had the misfortune of having to work with some of Huawei's code and all I can say is it's about the worst code I have ever seen. Coding style and indentation was often random and it goes downhill from there. It makes Cisco's code look like a masterpiece. It was full of GPL headers in their proprietary code, they just hacked it up into an unrecognizable mess. I wouldn't be surprised if there's hundreds of exploits in Huawei's code. They also base their stuff off of older versions of VxWorks which is not noted for being all that secure since there's only a single global address space and once you get the T-shell you're basically god.

Posting as AC for obvious reasons.

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