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Facebook Data Miner Will Shock You

samzenpus posted about 5 months ago | from the or-maybe-it-won't dept.

Facebook 164

MojoKid (1002251) writes "A new website sponsored by Ubisoft as part of its advertising campaign for the upcoming hacking-themed game Watch Dogs isn't just a plug for the title — it's a chilling example of exactly how easy it is for companies to mine your data. While most folks are normally averse to giving any application or service access to their Facebook account, the app can come back with some interesting results if you dare. Facebook's claims that it can identify you with 98.3% accuracy based on images.The Datashadow app also offers the ability to compare various character traits and gives a great deal of information about total number of posts, post times and inferred values about income, location, and lifestyle. Is Ubisoft actually performing some kind of data analysis? Almost certainly not. This is far from an exhaustive, comprehensive examination of someone's personality or FB posting habits. The companies that actually perform that kind of data analysis are anything but cheap. The point Ubisoft is making, however, is that your FB profile contains enormous amounts of information in a single place that can be mined in any number of ways. All of this information absolutely is combined and collated to create detailed digital profiles of all of us, and the more we engage with various online services (from Facebook to Google Plus), the larger the data pool becomes."

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And this is why.... (5, Insightful)

AltGrendel (175092) | about 5 months ago | (#46839755)

...I don't use Facebook. I'd keep away from it all if I could, but it's hard to be in the tech industry these days and have no/minimal online presence.

Re:And this is why.... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46839815)

So you don't use a service, but you think you're so important you have to tell everyone about it and even try to top post an item on a subject for the service you don't use... Hmmm, you need help.

Re:And this is why.... (2)

dsmithhfx (1772254) | about 5 months ago | (#46840585)

I think it's important to let Facebook and everyone else know why some find it useless and harmful. Potentially very, very harmful. But hey, knock yourself out. Just don't come crying when you're a victim, 'cause you had no idea 'they' were doing that.

Re:And this is why.... (5, Insightful)

erikkemperman (252014) | about 5 months ago | (#46839821)

...I don't use Facebook.

Me neither, but don't forget that FB does keep profiles on non-members too. And your friends who are on FB might mention you by name, upload photo's with you in it, and so on.

Re:And this is why.... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46839963)

That's why I don't have any friends, in addition to not using Facebook. (Seriously.)

Re:And this is why.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46840027)

I bet your enemies photoshop your face on to Margaret thatcher's body and tag you for lots of FB images. FB's shadow profile for you is very interesting.

Re:And this is why.... (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about 5 months ago | (#46840575)

Hmm... so? Being profiled as a former prime minister of Britain, could be worse.

Re:And this is why.... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46840977)

No, it couldn't.

Re:And this is why.... (5, Informative)

Travis Mansbridge (830557) | about 5 months ago | (#46839965)

And thanks to "like" embedding in every other page on the net, they can use a cookie to follow you (nearly) everywhere you go without you needing an account.

Re:And this is why.... (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46840021)

The Firefox plugin "Disconnect" is excellent for blocking this.

Re:And this is why.... (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46840035)

That's what Ghostery is for...

Re:And this is why.... (3, Insightful)

erikkemperman (252014) | about 5 months ago | (#46840593)

Ghostery was acquired by a marketing firm. That does not make it evil, per se, but probably deserves a bit more scrutiny.

blocking FB (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46840603)

That's what Ghostery is for...

Also:

echo "127.0.0.1 facebook.com" >> /etc/hosts
echo "127.0.0.1 www.facebook.com" >> /etc/hosts
echo "127.0.0.1 facebook.net" >> /etc/hosts
echo "127.0.0.1 www.facebook.net" >> /etc/hosts
echo "127.0.0.1 s-static.ak.facebook.com" >> /etc/hosts

Re:And this is why.... (3, Informative)

RJFerret (1279530) | about 5 months ago | (#46840313)

No button embedded on any pages I see with their .com and .net blocked by my Hosts file, slightly faster page loads without needing to wait for their servers too.

Re:And this is why.... (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46840659)

No button embedded on any pages I see with their .com and .net blocked by my Hosts file...

When the only sites you visit are xHamster, xTube, and 101BoyVideos.com, that's not a bad solution. But most people surf a few more sites

And Naturally.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46840449)

Only if you allow such cookie or like button to appear. FB* facebook* etc... all forwarded to 127.0.0.1 and strict cookies rules does wonder for the like button.

Re:And this is why.... (1)

jader3rd (2222716) | about 5 months ago | (#46840895)

And thanks to "like" embedding in every other page on the net, they can use a cookie to follow you (nearly) everywhere you go without you needing an account.

It's pretty easy to enable Tracking Protection to block everything coming from Facebook.

Re:And this is why.... (1)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | about 5 months ago | (#46840877)

Everyone does this -- when CNN post a link to a non-ad article about things to help with arthritis or the latest on diabetes research, they are building profiles of you and your IP address to bind you into higher-profit advertising groups for custom ad serving.

Re:And this is why.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46839877)

If you really think this article is about Facebook then you have bigger problems than whether or not you have a Facebook account.
 
Too many Slashdotters caught up in the branding game... can't see the forest for the trees.

Re:And this is why.... (5, Interesting)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about 5 months ago | (#46840063)

...I don't use Facebook. I'd keep away from it all if I could, but it's hard to be in the tech industry these days and have no/minimal online presence.

It doesn't matter. Everything you do online is tracked and logged by a handful of large marketing software firms. Googles probably the biggest. They log key data points about you as you do this. Lots of things you probably don't even think about like which fonts you have installed, your preferred OS, monitor resolution. All of this data on it's own seems harmless but combined it creates a very unique fingerprint for you.

The marketing software has plugins that websites can install, then the data about you is collected and stored in a centralized database. It's shared between all of the marketing companies clients. The end result is almost all of your data ends up in the same place regardless of what you do. You may have separate logins for Slashdot and that porns site, but that doesn't matter. They know your 2 separate accounts are for the same person. They might not know exactly who you are, but they don't need to. They just need to know you're shopping for tube socks, and display lots of adds for that. Oh, and by the way, once you finally buy the tube socks? Now all your accounts really are linked to your name.

ghostery (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46840535)

Ghostery, it works

Only if you allow it (1)

aepervius (535155) | about 5 months ago | (#46840617)

Since it has been known there has been addon and programs to randomize that for you adding/removing unused fonts/drivers/codecs/etc.... Naturally this is an escalation race until then next one they use to identify. But in the mean time good luck linking all my persona together.

Re:And this is why.... (2)

Robert Goatse (984232) | about 5 months ago | (#46840321)

I don't think it's hard to be in "the business" without a stupid Facebook page. Aside from a few dummy test accounts, I've been gainfully employed for years without a FB presence. If you really want an online presence, create a blog and post some interesting research, etc. That, IMHO, would be way better than playing Farmville or whatever the FB game of choice is thesedays.

link (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46839769)

would it be too much to ask for a link to the website you're talking about

Re:link (4, Informative)

bemenaker (852000) | about 5 months ago | (#46839939)

digitalshadow.com It's interesting to see what it says. I was suprised more by how much it got wrong, than by what it got right.

Re:link (1)

FictionPimp (712802) | about 5 months ago | (#46840079)

Apparently I use facebook so little that it knows nothing about me except for I have 20 friends who I never talk to.

Re:link (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46840291)

Same here. Not using my real name helps a lot. Although it knows that my wife is important to me, it doesn't know why. The first block in the "Important people" showed a broken image icon and said "Undetermined". The "Tactical" section was blank. The "time to strike" was empty.

My plans are proceeded apace. Today, defeating a toy webpage connected to a video game. Tomorrow--evading security at the Big Lots! Mwahahahahaha!!

Re:link (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46840315)

"proceeding"

dammit.

Re:link (1)

zaren (204877) | about 5 months ago | (#46840345)

The "password hacking attempt" at the bottom of the page had me concerned for a moment, but after seeing that it was just iterating common words found on my FB page with random l33tsp34k, I stopped worrying. I liked how they labeled one of my best friends (best man at my wedding) and my god daughter as stalking targets. I wasn't that impressed with the site.

Re:link (1)

Robadob (1800074) | about 5 months ago | (#46840465)

Doesn't seem to want to let me auth, US only?

Re:link (1)

Chrisq (894406) | about 5 months ago | (#46840945)

Same here:

We could not log you in: You can't log in to this app because you do not meet this app's requirements for country, age or other criteria.

Re:link (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46840711)

Kinda difficult to use because I refuse to use my FB login anywhere but FB.

Abstergo Data Miner (2)

Pseudonym (62607) | about 5 months ago | (#46839775)

You know it's true.

Anonymity by default (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46839789)

Tor should be the default network stack for the internet.
Providing credentials/identity anywhere must be an active decision.

Re:Anonymity by default (3, Insightful)

barlevg (2111272) | about 5 months ago | (#46839943)

Let's ignore for a minute how it is to navigate the internet through Tor. Let's also ignore for a minute that the FBI has compromised roughly half of Tor sites [slashdot.org] and that they control a fair number of Tor nodes [wired.com] . Why do you think masking your IP will help you at all when you log onto Facebook and *give them* all your personal data?

Re:Anonymity by default (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46840265)

Tor cannot protect you against javascript enabled unique browser analysis of the sort EFF's panopticon project explains. BTW my and likely your browser won't go there because it claims the cert is untrusted. Does EFF know about this? (hello?) .

Moreover ,owning the vast majority of Tor nodes would be just a rounding error in the NSA budget. So you do the math,

Bottom line, don't break the law (duh) and hope they're not killing / jailing people for their political beliefs (that will happen in a later adminstration under more stressful times...)

Wolfram Alpha (3, Interesting)

astro (20275) | about 5 months ago | (#46839799)

I'd place a small wager that Ubi partnered with Wolfram Alpha on this - I did the Watch Dogs thing about a week ago, and thought it was actually a quite coolly stylized representation of basically very close to what WA spits out as analysis of my Facebook profile. I wasn't shocked. Rather, I thought it was pretty trick marketing, and was impressed.

Re:Wolfram Alpha (3, Insightful)

plover (150551) | about 5 months ago | (#46839883)

I think TFA was incorrect when they said "it will shock you". They should have said "it will startle non-technical people." But that's not as pithy, and not as attention grabbing, and doesn't get your article re-blogged on Slashdot.

You think? (4, Insightful)

adam525 (813427) | about 5 months ago | (#46839803)

You send ALL of your pictures and your phone number and your email address to this site..

Every morning you post everything that little mitzi and junior did at the ball game yesterday, as if anyone cares. You're favorite movies, books, TV shows, who you are in a relationship with. People will put EVERYTHING about them in their Facebook profile, and then they're surprised that it's easy for this company to track your habits, or for potential employers to screen you?

Re:You think? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46839909)

I always wondered what happens if you just use a nickname, they way we did on the Internet at the age of myspace and before that. I just don't understand how and why people thought it's ok to put their real names on the internet. I still register to forums/online services with fake names and nicknames...

In this case what will potential employers look for? Sure your nicknamed profile will be still data mined but it will not be associated with your real name. Basically I am asking if this is still a possibility. On my little experience on fb it is very seldom for one to refer to you with your full real name. At best he refers to you by your first name....

Re: You think? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46840335)

...i've a pseudonymous facebook account i access two or three times a year when friends or family want to share pictures therein...digitalshadow pulls up nothing of note: most field remain blank and those filled-in either parrot my scant pseudonymous profile fields or present flat-out inaccurate speculation...

Re:You think? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46839979)

You send ALL of your pictures and your phone number and your email address to this site.. Every morning you post everything that little mitzi and junior did at the ball game yesterday, as if anyone cares. You're favorite movies, books, TV shows, who you are in a relationship with. People will put EVERYTHING about them in their Facebook profile, and then they're surprised that it's easy for this company to track your habits, or for potential employers to screen you?

So what? A company knows my name, contact info, and some other public details. As long as you don't post stupid stuff or highly polarizing info there's no need for worry. I want them to track my habits. Makes sending me ads and offers more targeted.

employers to screen you

Same deal. Why would an employer care about posting pics of my pets/kids/vacations? Sheesh, you make it sound like you have a lot to keep in your closet. Here's a hint, don't be evil. Do good and it doesn't matter.

Re:You think? (2)

CrimsonAvenger (580665) | about 5 months ago | (#46840721)

You're favorite movies

No, I am NOT favorite movies.

That aside, I don't use FB. So there wasn't any data for that site to mine.

Re:You think? (2)

Rob the Bold (788862) | about 5 months ago | (#46841021)

You're favorite movies

No, I am NOT favorite movies.

That aside, I don't use FB. So there wasn't any data for that site to mine.

Are you sure? You didn't give them data about you -- at least not directly and on purpose -- but who's to say your friends and family haven't? (And since you and I aren't using facebook, we know even less about what's being said about us there . . . ) And by "friends", I mean the facebook definition of "friend," i.e. someone who knows you by name. Does facebook collect and analyze this anecdotal evidence about us non-facebook users? If there's money to be made at it, I'd guess "yes".

Ubisoft (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46839807)

Kinda like Mussolini pointing that Hitler is a Dictator.

FB (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46839827)

FBI

Pointlessly shocking the sheep. (1, Redundant)

nimbius (983462) | about 5 months ago | (#46839843)

Anyone who has a legitimate concern for their privacy and personal security has absolutely rid themselves of google plus and facebook. It didnt take a clever app to convince us, foiled fedoras or not, that we were as much a product as a herd of free-range cattle. our cud would be our status, the apple our friend request. We were to spend lazy afternoons basking on the hillside in the glow of farmville and grow strong and fat on content from friends and our mobile devices. This app is the same as working a stun bolt in front of a heiffer. Sure its loud and gets a response every time, but one must wonder if the audience ever truly understands its ultimate implication.

The actual website (5, Informative)

SigmundFreud (656053) | about 5 months ago | (#46839845)

Pity the article did not mention it: the site can be found at http://digitalshadow.com/ [digitalshadow.com] It seems to be US only, though.

Re:The actual website (4, Insightful)

weave (48069) | about 5 months ago | (#46840087)

Watch Dogs Digital Shadow will receive the following info: your public profile, friend list, News Feed, relationships, birthday, work history, status updates, education history, groups, hometown, interests, current city, photos, religious and political views, follows and followers, personal description and likes and your friends' status updates and photos.

So basically you give them access to all of your data, and then they tell you all about you.

What a shock.

Re:The actual website (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46840275)

I had a couple of friends try this and it didn't work for crap. It said one lived in a different state. I'm not sure how it missed that one. I'm going to call this BETA because it failed massively on the 2 I watched.

Re:The actual website (1)

tverbeek (457094) | about 5 months ago | (#46840513)

Basically it parrots back to you the information you just gave it access to from your Facebook profile, does some simple statistical calculations from your posts, adds some horoscope-style comments about your personality (I think mine was based on the fact that "craft beer" is one of my Likes), then generates a list of the kinds of dumb passwords that people come up with, based on their birth year, interests, whatever (3dward1970).
 
I wish I made as much money as it thinks I do.

Re:The actual website (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46840645)

What is really interesting is that the site took my profile pics, and found other pics of me using facial recognition, but the pics it turned up were *not marked public*... In other words, this app (or whatever facial recognition API it used) has access to all pictures on Facebook, not just those market public. Most half-aware users at least expected Facebook to keep pics marked as private from being seen by random passers by on the internet... but they are not. That's the shock, IMO.

Re:The actual website (4, Interesting)

weave (48069) | about 5 months ago | (#46840681)

Not really shocking. In the permissions you give it:

and your friends' status updates and photos.

So if one of your friends gave them permission, then they can grab the photos that way.

So yeah, what you share put to your friends can be given away by them.

Opinion: Facebook shouldn't allow an app to gain access to friend's data like this unless that data is marked public.

Re:The actual website (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46841029)

It then re-displays it with buzzwords related to the game. I liked wolframalpha's facebook report better.

Re:The actual website (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46840125)

I don't get it. There was just a login with FaceBook button and a fancy background animation

Re: The actual website (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46840761)

Call it what it is... "geotarded"

The sooner we can make that a dirty word the better, imho. Fucking pointless and awful not to mention annoying.

Ha (2, Funny)

synapse7 (1075571) | about 5 months ago | (#46839857)

I don't have facebook, so the shock, is on you! hahahaha

Re:Ha (1)

OzPeter (195038) | about 5 months ago | (#46839915)

I don't have facebook, so the shock, is on you! hahahaha

Well given that only the Zuck has Facebook, that's hardly surprising.

Re:Ha (2)

Opportunist (166417) | about 5 months ago | (#46840701)

Don't worry. Even if you don't have FB, FB has you.

The difference between having a FB account and not having one is only how much control you retain over your information. Not having one does not mean you're not present there. Your friends, coworkers, other people who deal with you have FB pages and whatever they write about you will be on there. And that's what is going to be on FB about you. For good or ill, correct or not.

Personally, I prefer to add a bit of misinformation, just in case my "friends" post stuff about me on FB that actually has something to do with reality.

http://digitalshadow.com/ (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46839903)

http://digitalshadow.com/

That's the URL for checking it. Otherwise you have to click and click and click...

"people with similar beliefs tend to cluster" (3, Interesting)

Gaygirlie (1657131) | about 5 months ago | (#46839911)

There's this line in the article that says "people with similar beliefs tend to cluster together" -- it may be my best defense against datamining me. The people I have on my Facebook - account pretty much have nothing in common with me except for family members, and even they only share blood with me. If you were to base your opinion on me on the people that have added me to their circles you'd pretty much be totally off the course.

Re:"people with similar beliefs tend to cluster" (2)

mlw4428 (1029576) | about 5 months ago | (#46840283)

Problem is that it's easier to hide in a crowd than alone. It might be much easier to ID you if your thoughts/preferences stand out. Blending into a crowd obscures your personal data.

Re:"people with similar beliefs tend to cluster" (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | about 5 months ago | (#46840479)

That's real world thinking that doesn't translate to the internet.

How does blending into a crowd obscure anything on facebook?

You can avoid facebook data miners... (5, Funny)

kcmastrpc (2818817) | about 5 months ago | (#46839933)

Using this one weird trick!!!

Re:You can avoid facebook data miners... (4, Interesting)

tippe (1136385) | about 5 months ago | (#46840017)

That is exactly what I was thinking when I read that title. I expect the next slashdot story to be about a Columbus mom who is hated by computer anti-virus experts because she discovered one simple trick to rid your computer of viruses (with shocking results!!!).

Re:You can avoid facebook data miners... (1)

tverbeek (457094) | about 5 months ago | (#46840853)

I'm pretty sure that mom lives in Grand Rapids. I've seen it in ads.

Something to do (3, Interesting)

kqc7011 (525426) | about 5 months ago | (#46840003)

I feed most / some my profiles with false information. The email address that I use for sign-ups gets most of my spam. The land line that I use for sign-ups goes to a two ring answering machine with a short message and minimum time to record the spiel. The intentional misspelling of my name shows up on my junk snail mail. The multitude of birthdays that I have show up regularly. I sign up for emailing lists that I have no interest in, then after awhile remove myself from said lists. Those are just some of the things done.

Re: Something to do (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46840075)

But, isn't it even worse? The problem is not so much knowing who and what you are, the problem is what will someone do with that, decisions they may make and actions they take that will affect you. What we all fear about it is someone changing (manipulating) our free will, or discriminating against us. Perhaps information availability on its own is not what is a problem. They might as well have it if they couldn't harm me with it. For that to happen, we the targets should have our defenses in knowledge of both our true selfs and psychology (against manipulation) and our mutual solidarity and tolerance (against character assassinations)... and in some cases massive amounts of restraining orders!

Re:Something to do (0)

GrumpySteen (1250194) | about 5 months ago | (#46840083)

I sign up for emailing lists that I have no interest in, then after awhile remove myself from said lists. Those are just some of the things done.

Congratulations! You have the most boring life I've ever heard of. The sad part is that you seem to be proud of it.

Does anyone here (2)

WormholeFiend (674934) | about 5 months ago | (#46840007)

believe that slashdotters' posting habits and contents of their comments are of no mining interest to anyone?

Re:Does anyone here (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46840203)

Exactly, all of this goes into developing profiles of your political beliefs and a wide variety of other things. See my anonymous comment titled "it's worse than that". There's a reason you can't post to /. without enabling javascript even though web forms and http posts were designed to work without javascript. Javascript is the means through which spying takes place, irrespective of Tor or anonymous proxy use. See EFF's panopticon project for why javascript enables them to nail you uniquely no matter what else you do.

Correction (1)

simplypeachy (706253) | about 5 months ago | (#46840015)

It really won't shock me at all. Stupid Privoxy and its list of URL requests :-(

NSA (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46840039)

Online companies need to totally violate the populations need for privacy about things like life style orientation, health status, psychological profile, bad or deviant habits, etc., in contraindication to existing laws and intents contained within the legal system so they can continue to provide it to the NSA wholesale under likely secret laws. This is why, with the unholy collusion of our corporacratic oligarchocracy that the actual electorate has no say in the matter and is not being represented by it's elected officials or even being accurately and fully reported in the corporate media. This won;t change along with all out other current raft of social ills till there is a grassroots counter culture.

Where is the privacy policy of that site? (4, Insightful)

aviators99 (895782) | about 5 months ago | (#46840041)

It's like a sick joke! They have a site that shows how much data they can mine (with your permission) and then they can do whatever they want with it?

It's worse than that. (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46840067)

Some of the same entities who maintain databases on you also develop and maintain personal profiles on you. This includes things like ability to defer gratification, sexual promiscuity / addiction, likelihood of having an STD (and which one(s)), sexual fetishes level of argumentativeness or agreeableness, your rank on a scale of respect for or defiance of authority,,(authoritarian scale), detailed political beliefs, number of past boyfriend or girlfriends and whether you were dumped or dumpee, likely personal frailties (vanity, you think you're too fat, you think you're smart, you conduct yourself with an exaggerated sense of entitlement). All o this is derived from FB ad other places and is used to profile you in various contexts from advertising to getting a job to loan applications to security checks and personal "risk profiles".

Trust me. .

Completely useless information (4, Informative)

z_gringo (452163) | about 5 months ago | (#46840071)

I use Facebook quite a bit. I also leave nearly all of my information as viewable publicly. This digital shadow app couldn't even accurately present information that is publicly posted or information to which it was given implicit access by logging in through Facebook. Location, Active times, close friends, income.. All completely wrong. I think that page is just a ruse to gain access to your Facebook information, which will then be used for other purposes.

Shock me? No (5, Insightful)

fascismforthepeople (2805977) | about 5 months ago | (#46840147)

I would be shocked if it drove people to stop giving up private information for free to facebook.

Sidenote: 6 trackers on /. yro.slashdot.org (5, Informative)

Qbertino (265505) | about 5 months ago | (#46840167)

Sidenote: While you are reading this, 6 trackers on slashdot.org are tracking you.

Just saying.

Re:Sidenote: 6 trackers on /. yro.slashdot.org (1)

dltaylor (7510) | about 5 months ago | (#46840233)

Not on my browser install.

BTW, in English, the proper names of languages, such as German, are capitalized.

Unimpressed. Lame game tie-in. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46840195)

Shocked? Nope.

Facebook has a fictitious high school and no college for me, and no job titles it recognized, though I use real job titles, so it estimated my salary based on being a high school grad aged 49. It got it wrong.

All the boxes, and I'm not sure what was supposed to be in them, say "insufficient data".

It used words like "need" and "poop", in articles about my cats, to conclude I was self-absorbed, neurotic and insecure. On Facebook. Where even the most well-adjusted people post inane, narcissistic crap about themselves.

I'm sure Facebook does a better job of analyzing the data, and it'd be newsworthy to know what they are able to figure out about my humorous posts and incomplete, semi-fictitious profile. But this lame game tie-in is not newsworthy.

Not really (1)

kajong0007 (3558601) | about 5 months ago | (#46840223)

Nope. This is exactly what I expected. Thanks for playing.

Also, why do you have a link-bait title? Have we stooped so low?

FB contains..information in a single place (1)

Threni (635302) | about 5 months ago | (#46840241)

> The point Ubisoft is making, however, is that your FB profile contains enormous
> amounts of information in a single place that can be mined in any number of ways.

Yeah, that's why we like it. That's why we use it. It's the point of Facebook. Without that info, what exactly would it be?

Seriously, if people didn't like it they'd have stopped using it by now. Please take the paranoia elsewhere; some of us have a life.

Interesting premise but pretty limited (1)

jeffmeden (135043) | about 5 months ago | (#46840261)

Unless you really _really_ open yourself up to Facebook, the info isnt a whole lot of good. They were totally off on where I was located, but were kind of close to where I worked but were also totally off the mark on income. The tags to/from classifications are interesting but really one dimensional.

I did like the list of easy to remember passwords they generated at the end, though.

Re:Interesting premise but pretty limited (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46840367)

The data FB gives out and the data they maintain internally are completely different

Completely.

Different.

I am SHOCKED!...Shocked (1)

Grey Geezer (2699315) | about 5 months ago | (#46840289)

that data mining is going on in this establishment...

A warning (1)

purnima (243606) | about 5 months ago | (#46840307)

It may be a coincidence. After giving permission to this Ubisoft site, my poker account of facebook was banned. What gives? Is the page a ruse to gain access to your facebook account?

Re:A warning (1)

Wootery (1087023) | about 5 months ago | (#46840671)

Is the page a ruse to gain access to your facebook account?

I don't follow. Did they ask for your Facebook password? There's you answer.

Don't tell me what I'll be shocked by (2)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about 5 months ago | (#46840431)

Facebook Data Miner Will Shock You

No, no it won't. But only six words in I already feel like this story is treating me like an idiot. Nice.

Platform Apps (1)

Salo2112 (628590) | about 5 months ago | (#46840547)

The first thing all the security people tell you to do is turn off platform apps, and this site does not work without them. Nice.

Unimpressed. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46840635)

This isn't frightening at all. It's kind of sad. It found pictures I posted on my facebook because I gave them access to it. Other than that, it notes that I have high levels of interaction with my wife and my mom, but thinks my mom and the best man at my wedding may be potentially hostile towards me. It thinks I live in the remains of an abandoned town that I went urban exploring in 2 years ago. Oh, and it thinks that I'm submissive and conformist because I use the word "awesome". Sorry, smart guy, I just grew up in the 80s. It's like letting some random douchebag psych undergrad look at your profile and analyze you from it.

Got nothin on me (2)

DarwinSurvivor (1752106) | about 5 months ago | (#46840641)

We could not log you in: You can't log in to this app because you do not meet this app's requirements for country, age or other criteria.

I am the shadow, and the smoke in your eyes, I am the ghost, that hides in the night.

Bow before your elusive target!

Introducing: The Facebook Game (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about 5 months ago | (#46840649)

No, not another stupid Farmville crap browser game where you're supposed to toss money at it. No, Facebook, the game.

The goal is to show up in a marketing research as someone who is anything but you.

If you play well, you can win your privacy.

'most folks'? (1)

Wootery (1087023) | about 5 months ago | (#46840661)

While most folks are normally averse to giving any application or service access to their Facebook account

Really? Most folks? I personally am averse to doing this (I also go to the 'extreme' of only ever using Facebook inside a Private Browsing window, you know, as a /. tin-foil-hat-wearer and all), but there are a lot of people who happily integrate, say, Spotify and Facebook.

ohh! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46840735)

Facebook knows I like fantasy, sf, art, cats, John Stewart, science and 1st Edition AD&D!

Dumber than advertised. (1)

Kiyyik (954108) | about 5 months ago | (#46840737)

So I just tried it (it's digitalshadow.com if you are having trouble digging it up), and it's not great shakes. Mostly I got "Insufficient Data", but what few things it worked out it got mostly--even comically--wrong.

Ministry of Misinformation (1)

retech (1228598) | about 5 months ago | (#46840745)

So why not use it but with wrong info? I caved because I was losing contact with some people that only network via social media. They got tired of emails and were impossible to get on a phone. My profile has nothing of importance. No location info. And all the data I did put in is wrong, grossly wrong. I never message directly with detailed info, I will just reply telling them to swap to email. This works for both of us. And harvesters have a very good set of data on me. It's just all wrong.

Shocking!! Indeed Very Shocking!! (4, Insightful)

kgskgs (938843) | about 5 months ago | (#46840759)

What shocked me indeed was the headline of the posting.
We have seen enough of these "This will shock you" in tabloids and lately even on CNN.
I am shocked to see this at Slashdot on consecutive two days.
Yesterday there was some other headline about how some rubber band shapes shocked scientists.

Let me read the headline and let me decide whether I want to be shocked or not. Why are you telling me that I will be shocked?
Pathetic!! Real pathetic!! Nothing turns me off more than the following three types of headlines.

"What this person said will shock you"
"XXX did what to stop XXX ?"
"The five things every should ..."

Slashdot is turning into tabloid. Instead of printing about trashy reality shows and gossip about royal families, they somehow find things related to technology. That's the only difference.
Slashdot, this had been a major turnoff.

Sigh!!

Again... (1)

koan (80826) | about 5 months ago | (#46840875)

Why are you using Facebook?

FB consolidating online communication (2)

Sir_Eptishous (873977) | about 5 months ago | (#46840959)

FB logins are now required more and more to do things online.
A favorite radio station I listen to this morning mentioned all requests now must come via FB login.
Can't they see how utterly wrong this is?
It amazes me that anyone has to have this explained.

Then there are government entities, cities, counties, etc, that are requiring FB logins to communicate or connect with them.
This is so utterly wrong on so many levels.

URL; child's play (1)

OneAhead (1495535) | about 5 months ago | (#46841015)

Here's [digitalshadow.com] the URL that is missing from the summary.
BTW, this is child's play compared to what Google can do. Not to even mention the NSA...
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