Beta
×

Thank you!

We are sorry to see you leave - Beta is different and we value the time you took to try it out. Before you decide to go, please take a look at some value-adds for Beta and learn more about it. Thank you for reading Slashdot, and for making the site better!

Oklahoma Botched an Execution With Untested Lethal Injection Drugs

Unknown Lamer posted about 7 months ago | from the firing-squads-make-a-comeback dept.

Crime 1198

Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes "The state of Oklahoma had scheduled two executions for Tuesday, April 29th. This in spite of myriad objections that the drugs being used for both lethal injections had not been tested, and thus could violate the constitutional right to the courts, as well as the 8th Amendment: protection from cruel and unusual punishment. After much legal and political wrangling, the state proceeded with the executions anyway. It soon became clear that the critics' worst case scenarios were coming true — Oklahoma violently botched the first execution. The inmate "blew" a vein and had a heart attack. The state quickly postponed the second one. 'After weeks of Oklahoma refusing to disclose basic information about the drugs for tonight's lethal injection procedures, tonight, Clayton Lockett was tortured to death,' Madeline Cohen, the attorney of Charles Warner, the second man scheduled for execution, said in a statement. Katie Fretland at The Guardian reported from the scene of the botched attempt to execute Lockett using the untested, unvetted, and therefore potentially unconstitutional lethal injection drugs." sciencehabit also points out a study indicating that around 4% of death row inmates in the U.S. are likely innocent.

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

so? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46877843)

it was a nigger. who cares!

Re:so? (-1, Offtopic)

Tukz (664339) | about 7 months ago | (#46877861)

You just went full retard.
Never go full retard.

Re:so? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46878061)

better to be a retard than a fucking porch monkey.

Re:so? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46878145)

You got that right!

Re:so? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46878217)

>retard

I didn't realize this word was more acceptable in 2014.

What's the problem? (0, Flamebait)

Doug Otto (2821601) | about 7 months ago | (#46877847)

The inmate "blew" a vein and had a heart attack.

Sounds like it worked okay.

Re:What's the problem? (5, Insightful)

i kan reed (749298) | about 7 months ago | (#46877917)

Not all heart attacks kill. Many induce absolutely tremendous levels of suffering.

Re:What's the problem? (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46878037)

See this makes my whole week. Shitbag dirty criminal animal who rapes and murders multiple people gets "absolutely tremendous levels of suffering"

There is a huge grin on my face right now. Knowing it pisses you off even makes me happier.

Cool!

Capthca: Hilarity! Can you believe it! HAHAHAH Fuck off.,

Re:What's the problem? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46878083)

Again, it sounded like it worked. Why do you care about the suffering of a murderer, anyway? A quick, painless death is getting off light for killing an innocent person.

If we didn't need to over-complicate the issue, which we don't, for the price of a box of bullets we could ensure the quick and painless death of these convicted murderers.

Re:What's the problem? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46878111)

What's this?

[holding right hand up with index finger and thumb fake playing worlds smallest violin]

Come on, what is it?

It's the worlds smallest violin.

Fuckwad.

Re:What's the problem? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46877923)

It took him 47 minutes to die and he was conscious.
Sounds fair to me, he raped and murdered an 11 MONTH old girl.

Re:What's the problem? (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46878031)

Sounds fair to me, he raped and murdered an 11 MONTH old girl.

Not that the crime is entirely relevant to whether state executions should be okay or not, but you appear to suffer from reading comprehension issues. The crime you refer to was committed by the inmate who had their execution stayed after the first botched one.

Re:What's the problem? (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46878107)

How are we any better if we drop down to the same level?

Re:What's the problem? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46877933)

Yea, I honestly fail to see the problem here, he's dead, so it worked.

Fuck this, I say just ask the guy how he prefers to die, no choice = 45 to the coconut.

This is a non-issue if I ever saw one.

BTW:

"Clayton Lockett told Neiman to get out of her pickup, and he shot her twice when she failed to give him her keys and the alarm code for the pickup, police were told.

Mathis told police he dug a grave for Neiman and buried her with Alfonzo Lockett's help.

The rape victim and Bornt told police they and Bornt's son then were brought back to Bornt's home.

The three men left in Bornt's pickup. The car Clayton Lockett drove to Perry apparently was stolen and was impounded by police when officers spotted it parked outside Bornt's duplex.

Jasper Lockett, 16, said his brother Alfonzo told him that Clayton Lockett threatened to kill him and Mathis if they went to police.

Police said Mathis and Alfonzo Lockett admitted they took part in the assault on Bornt and helped tie up the two women and drive them to rural Kay County.

Alfonzo Lockett showed authorities where Neiman was buried. Her mouth still was bound with duct tape, according to court records."

Painful agonizing death for this shitbird is a bonus here.

Re:What's the problem? (5, Insightful)

TheCarp (96830) | about 7 months ago | (#46878039)

I am actually mostly against the death penalty but I agree on this one. All this concern over suffering of someone you are planning to kill. It really strikes me as silly. If you really have the moral conviction to believe killing him is the right thing to do, then fucking grow some balls and do it. Shooting him in the head is many times more humane than this whole pseudomedical procedure of dressing it up.

If the people can't handle the blood shedding then they should admit they don't have the stomac for it and stop doing it; not try to dress it up and make it appear less barbaric.

Re:What's the problem? (5, Insightful)

TheRaven64 (641858) | about 7 months ago | (#46878165)

In that case, amend your constitution to say that it's fine to torture criminals once they've been convicted. If you're going to pretend to have the rule of law, then at least make a token effort to follow your own rules.

Re:What's the problem? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46877991)

He was executed, sounds like the drug work. He's dead, Taxpayers burden lifted keeping him alive and fed.

Re:What's the problem? (5, Interesting)

s.petry (762400) | about 7 months ago | (#46878131)

While funny, it distracts from several serious problems in the US.

First, why does the US still allow a death penalty? Surely there are some people with mental disorders that can not maintain a life with the rest of society, but this is what Prisons and mental health institutes are supposed to be for. We tend to argue how much a prisoner costs society, but rarely discuss the morality of executing people.

Next, and relates to the first is that the Prison systems in the US have become a for profit business. The privatization of prisons has caused countless issues. Such as contracts requiring a specific capacity at all times in prisons and the exploitation of prisoners. Laws have been passed to help keep prisons at capacity and nearly everyone in the US can commit several felonies every day without their knowledge. This means that we have people in prison that should probably not be there, and we lack the capacity to keep the really socially defunct people in jail.

We could discuss other issues, such as how rehabilitation in the US really does not exist and society lacks opportunity for people motivating people to illegal activities but can save that for later. We should address why the US has the highest percentage of people in prison in the world, and why we still have executions first.

Re:What's the problem? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46878207)

These are all fair questions, but you have to understand that the death penalty is just that, a penalty. Many believe that the nature of the crime, the lack of potential for rehabilitation and other factors make execution the right thing to do. You may disagree with that, and in many states you are in the majority.

But not all of them. And this one is a states decision, as it should be. So vote your conscisnce or move.

Punishment fits the crime (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46877849)

He shot someone and watched as his two friends buried her ALIVE. 20 minutes of semi-conscious agony ending in a heartattack vs. breathing dirt. You decide...

Re:Punishment fits the crime (5, Insightful)

Maury Markowitz (452832) | about 7 months ago | (#46877875)

> 20 minutes of semi-conscious agony ending in a heart attack vs. breathing dirt

False dichotomy. Everyone reading this would not be effected by either, as long as he's behind bars.

Cue the madding crowds telling me why I'm wrong to hold my opinion

Re:Punishment fits the crime (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46877963)

So you have no sense of justice then.
I can not say if you are wrong or right. I can only say you do not posses any sense of justice.

Re:Punishment fits the crime (5, Insightful)

moronoxyd (1000371) | about 7 months ago | (#46878095)

It is not justice if somebody is been given the death penalty and then gets 45 minutes of torture on top.

There is a reason torture (or cruel and unusual punishment) is not legal. If we treat criminals not better then they treated their victims we're not better than they are.

As a society we should strife to be better than our criminals and not hide our own cruelty behind words like justice and punishment.

Re:Punishment fits the crime (5, Insightful)

i kan reed (749298) | about 7 months ago | (#46877975)

Some people think that the justice systems' job is the arbiter of karma, rather than preventing crime. I've not discovered a way to discuss these things with the former group. I'm not sure what you can tell that kind of person.

Robert sapolsky talks about reciprocity, etc (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46878133)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YWZAL64E0DI

Re:Punishment fits the crime (5, Interesting)

91degrees (207121) | about 7 months ago | (#46878141)

It's hard to argue with someone who disagrees on such a fundeental point. However, I always thought Tolkein (through Gandalf) put it quite well:

Many that live deserve death. Some that die deserve life. Can you give it to them, Frodo? Do not be too eager to deal out death in judgment.

Re:Punishment fits the crime (2, Insightful)

acidradio (659704) | about 7 months ago | (#46878009)

We have to pay for this monster to live for the rest of his life. We *all* pay taxes for that. It's expensive. Tell me how that doesn't affect us. A death-row inmate costs, what, $50-75-100K/yr to house and feed? We get no value from this. This is akin to toxic waste disposal. How many doctors, teachers, scientists can we hire for the amount of money we pay to house these people? How much further would we be as a society if we spent the money on getting ahead, not waste disposal?

I'm sure I will get an argument that "All the appeals that death row inmates use before being put to death cost more than just imprisoning them for life!" Maybe if we cleaned up our unnecessarily exhaustive legal process that has basically become a job program this wouldn't be an issue.

Re:Punishment fits the crime (5, Informative)

OzPeter (195038) | about 7 months ago | (#46878199)

We have to pay for this monster to live for the rest of his life. We *all* pay taxes for that. It's expensive.

And carrying out a death penalty also has it's costs. Take a read of costs death penalty [deathpenaltyinfo.org] . (I may be cherry picking a bit here but) From that article it was estimated that California could save $170 million a year by commuting al death sentences to life in prison.

So do you want to pay more or less taxes?

Re:Punishment fits the crime (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46878043)

It's out of fairness. People should not be allowed to be evil and get away with it gracefully. Otherwise, you just encouraged a "fuck you, I can do what I want and get off easy" mentality. People need to fear the ramifications of being evil fucking asshole.

Re:Punishment fits the crime (5, Insightful)

delt0r (999393) | about 7 months ago | (#46878223)

Yea because otherwise everyone will be evil. I mean its lucky the US has the death penalty because it has deterred so many of the evil fucking people. Oh wait, the US has one of the worse rates of violent crime. States with the death penalty don't have less of this crime. It is not a preventive nor a deterrent.

Re:Punishment fits the crime (1)

binarylarry (1338699) | about 7 months ago | (#46877897)

He also raped her friend that tagged along with her.

Re:Punishment fits the crime (2)

i kan reed (749298) | about 7 months ago | (#46877989)

Did you know that in many countries, sentences are served simultaneously, rather than consecutively?

Re:Punishment fits the crime (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46878105)

So you think people should be able to commit two crimes for the price of one.

Re:Punishment fits the crime (1)

SJHillman (1966756) | about 7 months ago | (#46878161)

And then are they released on double secret probation?

Simultaneously serving multiple sentences doesn't really make logical sense if they're being imprisoned 24/7 for the duration of their sentence. It's not like they can be imprisoned for 48 hours a day to serve two sentences simultaneously. What you're effectively doing is just having them serve one sentence and dropping the rest, not having them served simultaneously.

Re:Punishment fits the crime (2)

addie (470476) | about 7 months ago | (#46877921)

The punishment should be proportional to the crime, but does not need to mirror it. An eye for an eye is a bit outdated, no? If capital punishment is to be used, it should be done in a way that is neither cruel nor unusual - that's the law, until a jurisdiction collectively decides otherwise.

Breaking our laws to punish those who broke our laws: this may be widespread and socially acceptable to some people, but that doesn't make it right. If you want someone to be tortured to death, then seek a change in the law.

Re:Punishment fits the crime (3)

acidradio (659704) | about 7 months ago | (#46878067)

You're absolutely right. Proportional. He raped, tortured and murdered. So what is proportional to rape, tortured and murdered?

Re:Punishment fits the crime (5, Funny)

SJHillman (1966756) | about 7 months ago | (#46878177)

From my understanding, a week with Slashdot Beta should about do it.

Re:Punishment fits the crime (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46877935)

Maybe you fail to see justice is not about revenge.

Re:Punishment fits the crime (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46877947)

So you're saying a justice system shouldn't try to be any better than criminals?

Re:Punishment fits the crime (1)

Chrisq (894406) | about 7 months ago | (#46878025)

So you're saying a justice system shouldn't try to be any better than criminals?

Agree. This is the slippery slope that leads to barbaric systems like Sharia, with stoning for adultery, death for professing belief in other religions [blogspot.co.uk] , and so on.

Re:Punishment fits the crime (5, Insightful)

Zironic (1112127) | about 7 months ago | (#46877983)

Generally when we as a society decide that we do not torture criminals to death, it is not because we don't feel the criminals deserve it, but rather that we as a society are better then that.

Re:Punishment fits the crime (0)

OzPeter (195038) | about 7 months ago | (#46878003)

He shot someone and watched as his two friends buried her ALIVE. 20 minutes of semi-conscious agony ending in a heartattack vs. breathing dirt. You decide...

So you condone torture?

Re:Punishment fits the crime (4, Insightful)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about 7 months ago | (#46878153)

So, the standard philosophical counterargument is "An eye for an eye leaves the whole world blind" but I suspect that despite the fact that the edgucated world as a whole had already resolved that capital punishment is immoral over a thousand years ago, you'll continue to lack empathy for those you feel "don't deserve it" so I'll argue from your point of view.

Lets make several points so you can disagree with them directly if you feel you need to:
1. Capital punishment costs orders of magnitude more money than Life in prison. The trials have to be rigorous, and therough, we have to be absolutely sure of the defendants guilt before we execute them. They get guarenteed retrials and the evidence has to be air tight. As a result, capital punishement trials costs states many millions of dollars each.
2. Murder trials are very difficult on the victims family. In order to get a conviction the prosecution needs to present very gory details, interview the family on the stand in depth, etc...
3. Prison is worse than death.

So, if you want to save money, save the family grief, and punish the prisoner in pretty much the worst method available legally, let him rot in prison for the rest of his life. You don't even need to be an ethical person to know that it's the right thing to do from every perspective. When even the catholic church things what you're doing is too barbaric, you know you're doing something wrong.

Re:Punishment fits the crime (1)

sabre_13 (1813636) | about 7 months ago | (#46878171)

The criminals involved had no concern over the victims. They didn't ensure they had a comfortable safe end to their life, they most likely died in horrible trauma or worse. Should this individuals have died in a calm and wonderful way so he had no suffering....I'm sure that would be for the best, no one planned this, it just happened, do I feel for their family; Yes. Do I feel for the criminal: no his fate played out as it was planned.

Re:Punishment fits the crime (1)

cheetah_spottycat (106624) | about 7 months ago | (#46878203)

Well, if you want to go full-on medieval, let's do it properly and just implent the sharia. Slowly poisoning someone to death ... or stoning them. What is the difference? Yes, the stoning is the more honest option.

Time to move into the Century of the fruit bat. (5, Insightful)

delt0r (999393) | about 7 months ago | (#46877877)

Why does the US still even have the Death penalty?

Re:Time to move into the Century of the fruit bat. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46877961)

This? http://www.ok.gov/oag/documents/Lockett%20Clemency%20brf.pdf

Re:Time to move into the Century of the fruit bat. (1)

schneidafunk (795759) | about 7 months ago | (#46877977)

Because some crimes deserve the ultimate penalty. Read what this guy did and then tell me he doesn't deserve to die.

Re:Time to move into the Century of the fruit bat. (2)

oodaloop (1229816) | about 7 months ago | (#46878017)

That's your opinion. I feel the right to "life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness" means the government doesn't get to kill you. We had that before, and it wasn't great.

Re:Time to move into the Century of the fruit bat. (1)

schneidafunk (795759) | about 7 months ago | (#46878123)

'life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness' does not mean you get to rape & kill without punishment. That is what this guy did and his punishment was justified in my opinion.

Re:Time to move into the Century of the fruit bat. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46878143)

I feel the right to "life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness" means the government doesn't get to kill you.

While the line that you clipped from is sufficient to form the foundation of a legal system, you are forgetting the key aspect. He willfully and maliciously ended another's life, thus rejecting her right to life (as well as the other two stated rights) and forfeited his rights to the same. Or do you not believe that one who kidnaps another should be imprisoned? Or that one who steals should face a fine?
The punishment for a violation of another's rights should be proportional to the core right that was violated, with allowances for mercy.

Re:Time to move into the Century of the fruit bat. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46878225)

My apologies, I had misread the events. 'rejected his right to life... blah blah'

I tend to assume that 'rape and murder' charges together would mean one victim instead of about 20.

Re:Time to move into the Century of the fruit bat. (2)

SJHillman (1966756) | about 7 months ago | (#46878195)

You're taking away liberty and, usually, the pursuit of happiness. So why not life, if we're grouping them all together?

Re:Time to move into the Century of the fruit bat. (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46878029)

“Many that live deserve death. And some that die deserve life. Can you give it to them? Then do not be too eager to deal out death in judgement.”
  J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

Re:Time to move into the Century of the fruit bat. (1)

schneidafunk (795759) | about 7 months ago | (#46878085)

I would be fine giving this particular man the death penalty.

Re:Time to move into the Century of the fruit bat. (1)

delt0r (999393) | about 7 months ago | (#46878169)

And the legal system never screws it up right? Oh wait yes it does, all the time. And no i don't think they deserve to die. I don't think that solves anything.

Re:Time to move into the Century of the fruit bat. (3, Insightful)

smooth wombat (796938) | about 7 months ago | (#46878021)

Because of people like this. Or the person (or people) who thought it would be fun to put cats in a bag and beat them to death, or the guy who raped and killed an 11-month old.

For these reasons, and a whole host of others, these people have decided the basic rules of society do not apply to them. As a result they need to be removed. Keeping them alive does nothing except waste taxpayer money on people who will never be productive members of society.

That is why we have the death penalty.

Re:Time to move into the Century of the fruit bat. (3, Interesting)

delt0r (999393) | about 7 months ago | (#46878099)

So its unacceptable for them to behave this way, but its ok if the state does it?

Re:Time to move into the Century of the fruit bat. (4, Insightful)

OzPeter (195038) | about 7 months ago | (#46878121)

Because of people like this.

Given that the death penalty was in existence prior to his crime, yet the perp still did what he did, it seems that the threat of punishment was no deterrent. So if the death penalty is not a deterrent, why again does the US have it? It can't be to protect the victims, and I've seen figures that suggest locking someone up for life is actually cheaper to do (given all the appeals, special wings etc). The only conclusion I can realistically see is pure revenge by the rest of society.

Re:Time to move into the Century of the fruit bat. (1)

schneidafunk (795759) | about 7 months ago | (#46878179)

Your definition of revenge is my definition of justice in this case, because society at large is OK with it and not just the victim's relatives.

"Justice—as logically, legally, and ethically defined—isn’t really about “getting even” or experiencing a spiteful joy in retaliation. Instead, it’s about righting a wrong that most members of society (as opposed to simply the alleged victim) would agree is morally culpable. And the presumably unbiased (i.e., unemotional) moral rightness of such justice is based on cultural or community standards of fairness and equity. Whereas revenge has a certain selfish quality to it"

Re:Time to move into the Century of the fruit bat. (4, Insightful)

Jason Levine (196982) | about 7 months ago | (#46878191)

Two problems with this:

First of all, how do you decide who is a "waste of taxpayer money"? That seems to me like a slippery slope that could be applied to any group if the mob so deems it. Don't like a group? Declare their activities illegal and arrest them. Then declare that all they are doing is sitting in jail taking up taxpayer money and execute them to save some cash.

Secondly, what about the estimated 4% of people on death row who are innocent. There are people who, for various reasons (e.g. overzealous prosecutors, incompetent defense attorneys, corrupt police planting/hiding evidence, etc), were convicted of crimes that they didn't commit. They sometimes sit in jail for decades trying to get cleared. Sometimes they do (having lost years/decades of their life), sometimes they don't (cleared after they die in jail or are executed). If you wrongly jail someone, that's bad but you can release them. It's not a 100% payback for the time wrongly spent in prison, but it is something. If you execute an innocent person, you can't "un-execute" them. They are dead and no amount of "Oops, our bad" will change that.

This is why the death penalty - if it is to be kept - should only be applied exceedingly sparingly and only after a TON of legal maneuvers that are skewed towards the defendant not being executed. Better to keep a guilty person alive and in jail than to execute an innocent.

Re:Time to move into the Century of the fruit bat. (0)

cardpuncher (713057) | about 7 months ago | (#46878063)

For the same reason they're so keen on guns and against healthcare - the populus been induced into a state of perpetual fear so that it might more easily be manipulated. And fear needs to be fed.

crimes (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46877879)

Clayton Locket shot a man multiple times and then buried him alive. That same night he committed 18 other violent crimes including rape, burglary and assault.. http://www.ca10.uscourts.GOV/opinions/11/11-6040.pdf

I'm pretty sure no matter how he died, it was more humane than the murder and rape he committed.

Re:crimes (1)

TheBlueCrab (801925) | about 7 months ago | (#46877915)

Sure, the crime was absolutely horrific, but how does that give the state the right to violate his constitutional and legal rights and torture him to death with an untested method of execution? Obviously Oklahoma realized that what they did wouldn't pass muster, or they'd have gone ahead with the second execution on the schedule for the day.

Re:crimes (5, Insightful)

TheRaven64 (641858) | about 7 months ago | (#46877945)

Well, that's okay then. As long as you only violate due process when the mob thinks the guy really, really deserves it then there's no problem.

Re:crimes (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46877987)

Did you read it? He was given due process.

Re:crimes (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46878013)

I'm pretty sure no matter how he died, it was more humane than the murder and rape he committed.

And I'm pretty sure that no matter how inhumane his own actions were, the Eighth Amendment still applies to the method by which he is executed. Leaving him writhing on a table for 20 minutes would seem to fall outside the bounds.

It's simple, either do it right or don't fucking do it at all.

Re:crimes (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46878159)

I don't see why they don't just use bolt guns like they do with animals.

it wasn't botched (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46877881)

it was an execution. he died. pop the cork, it's a winner in my book.

Re:it wasn't botched (1)

MightyMartian (840721) | about 7 months ago | (#46877951)

It was an execution that almost certainly violated the constitutional ban on cruel and unusual punishment.

Re:it wasn't botched (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46878049)

It's a strange person that celebrates any death. Presumably though, it's this mentality that allows the death penalty to continue in the US.

Untested? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46877883)

Seems they've tested it now.

Re:Untested? (2)

DeathToBill (601486) | about 7 months ago | (#46878033)

I wondered about this. If being untested is a problem for methods of execution, how exactly are you ever going to have a usable method of execution?

I'm sure those opposed to the death penalty like it this way; methods of execution are not usable until they've been tested and they can't be tested because they're unconstitutional. Ergo, we can't execute anyone. But the same legalistic argument presented many times above applies to them, too; the constitution does not forbid capital punishment, only cruel and unusual punishment. If you want to get rid of capital punishment, you need to change the constitution, not try to game the legal system to get what you want without the due process of changing the constitution.

Re:Untested? (1)

Zironic (1112127) | about 7 months ago | (#46878125)

There's plenty of tested ways of execution. Decapitation, gassing, hanging, firing squad, the previous lethal cocktail etc.

Re:Untested? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46878147)

+1 Funny

news for nerds? (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46877899)

Lots more political posts of late, generally of a liberal slant. Whatever, but is the quality of the political discussion/diatribes that follow why folks read slashdot rather than move on or national review online or such.

Stuff that matters? Maybe. News for nerds? Not so much.

Re:news for nerds? (1)

addie (470476) | about 7 months ago | (#46877949)

The news has a whole lot to do with the method of execution and the combination of drugs they gave him. There's a lot of science there.

Whether or not we decide to discuss that is up to us.

Re:news for nerds? (1)

DeathToBill (601486) | about 7 months ago | (#46878045)

Yes, that's right, the science is the story here. /sarc

Re:news for nerds? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46878163)

The news has a whole lot to do with the method of execution and the combination of drugs they gave him. There's a lot of science there.

Whether or not we decide to discuss that is up to us.

This is about the pharmacology and physiology. Yeah, yeah, that's the ticket...

Red meat, nothing more.

What's the problem (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46877931)

bring back the firing squad. It is apparently neither cruel or unusual. Our police use bullets all the time for minor matters.

Untested lethal injection drugs... (1)

MoreThanThen (2956881) | about 7 months ago | (#46877937)

can now be labeled 'tested'.
The test can either be graded as a success/fail according to your ethics.

Nitrogen? (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46877967)

I find it hard to believe that no one has looked into execution using Nitrogen. Something akin to an old style dive helmet with a hose near the top to feed in gas. When the time comes, switch the flow over from air to pure nitrogen. Simple, cheap, painless and there is a limitless supply of Nitrogen.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inert_gas_asphyxiation

Re:Nitrogen? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46878221)

They did look into Death-by-Nitrogen, but it's far too likely to be painless and sometimes slightly pleasant, and the raving revenge rightwingers wouldn't have it.

Let's bring back crucifiction !

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qDO6HV6xTmI [youtube.com]

State government sponsored killing (1)

Machupo (59568) | about 7 months ago | (#46877971)

I am amazed at the cavalier attitude with which many people accept the right of their state government to kill its citizens, and furthermore, am chagrined when something "goes wrong" and people are outraged.

Re:State government sponsored killing (1)

acidradio (659704) | about 7 months ago | (#46878035)

You're right. It's time to bring back mob justice. Quick, cheap and easy.

Re:State government sponsored killing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46878065)

I am amazed at the cavalier attitude with which many people accept the right of their state government to lock up its citizens...

Hanging (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46878001)

I don't understand why hanging isn't used anymore. No chemicals to go wrong. No blown veins. Just drop them until dead. Boom. Done.

Failed injection. (4, Insightful)

jamesl (106902) | about 7 months ago | (#46878011)

According to Robert Patton, the director of Oklahoma's department of corrections, when doctors felt that the drugs were not having the required effect on Lockett, they discovered that a vein had ruptured.
This is not a problem related to the drug(s) used but incompetent administration.

This in spite of myriad objections that the drugs being used for both lethal injections had not been tested ...
How does one test lethal injections?

Torture is not okay. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46878023)

Just because the government is doing it doesn't make it right.

'Untested' had nothing to do with the botching. (4, Insightful)

oneiros27 (46144) | about 7 months ago | (#46878055)

It's one thing to claim about the drugs being untested .. and you can still probably claim they're untested, because all of the reports are suggesting that it was a blown out blood vessel, so the whole thing would've been botched no matter what drugs they had actually used.

(and before you say I'm just against executions ... I actually think that prisoners who are sentanced to life without parole should be given the opportunity to be administered euthenasia ... but the costs of capital punishment as they curently exist are so high that it should only be reserved for those really, really horrible crimes (which this one would seem to be).

Hmm (1)

argStyopa (232550) | about 7 months ago | (#46878079)

I guess the conclusion would be that if I don't want to die in agony on a gurney, probably a good idea not to be a murderer.

Personally, I don't understand why they don't just push them off a tall building. Gravity is free, nearly 100% guaranteed to work, and they have a few private moments then to reflect on their lives while they plummet. Plus on the faint chance it didn't work, trying again is free too. And then crows get to eat afterward, so it's "green" as well.

Oh, and "sciencehabit also points out a study indicating that around 4% of death row inmates in the U.S. are likely innocent." let's be careful with our use of language here. This is not 'random innocent people being dragged off the street, convicted of a capital crime, and being sentenced to death." This is generally "lifetime criminal ne'er-do-well scumbag who has caused incalculable misery in his* life and a rap sheet 10s of pages long if not hundreds, being *finally* convicted of something and then, after decades of appeals and 00s of 000s of $, finally executed".

*his, because it's generally a man. Evidence of sexism in the criminal justice system? (Obviously not, but I highlight it to preemptively mock the people that assume that disproportional racial convictions are likewise "proof" of racism in the system.)

Re:Hmm (1)

Zironic (1112127) | about 7 months ago | (#46878175)

The law forbids cruel and unusual punishments and regardless of cruel, pushing someone off a tall building is certainly unusual. It would also I suspect be a bitch to clean.

Hang them (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46878103)

Just hang them it's a tried and true method of making sure the prisoner is executed. All of these alternative ways are just there to make people feel better.

Re:Hang them (1)

RailGunner (554645) | about 7 months ago | (#46878189)

A simple .22lr to the head would do the job quicker.

And before someone tells me how much better a .45 ACP would be -- I carry a .45 every day. Love the round. But a .22 is a cheaper round, and typically doesn't exit the skull, instead, it bounces around the inside of a skull scrambling the brain.

Eye for an eye! (1)

RocketRabbit (830691) | about 7 months ago | (#46878117)

He should have been shot in the head and then buried alive. The death penalty is not assisted suicide. It should be terrifying and the circumstances should be as close as possible to those the perp inflicted on their victim. This devil deserved to be tortured to death.

Should we bring back the firing squad? (4, Interesting)

swb (14022) | about 7 months ago | (#46878135)

Or even something simpler, like some kind of coup de grace, maybe a 12 gauge slug to the back of the head? Maybe by making executions much more visceral we'll be less inclined to make them clean and clinical and stop thinking about them as clean and clinical.

As bloody as such an execution would be, perhaps it should be so and the judge, prosecuting attorney and lead low enforcement investigators could be mandated to be in attendance and watching. It's one thing to plant evidence, withhold exculpatory information from the defense, commit gross prosecutorial misconduct and run quadrennial judicial elections on your persona as a "hangin' judge" when the convicted is executed somewhere else in a manner more consistent with outpatient surgery than an actual execution.

But when you know ahead of time that if the death penalty goes through you're going to see a human being have a good chunk of the head taken off in front of you, maybe you might not sleep so well knowing it happened because you broke the rules.

Torture may have been Intentional. (1)

cheetah_spottycat (106624) | about 7 months ago | (#46878137)

Let's take a brief look into the mind of the supporters of the death penality. A BBC reporter investigated a few scientifically proven humane ways to kill a human being, and offered them to Robert Blecker, Professor criminal law and constitutional law at the New York Law School: https://www.youtube.com/watch?... [youtube.com] So, with people like these on the spearhead of the pro-death-penalty movement ... can we expect a humane death penalty?

at the risk of injecting (pardon pun) reason... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46878193)

the challenges have been around which specific drugs would be used & sourcing (compounding pharmacies vs pharmaceutical companies) - they could have been using brand Diprivan (propofol) & would have gotten the same result. I saw an interview w/the guy who more or less "invented" lethal injection where he said the drugs always work, it's the delivery that can get screwed up b/c it's carried out by "idiots" (i.e. prison guards). this was a physical problem, not a chemical one but that said if they can't reliably run an IV the drugs & sources are moot.

and that said, I'm definitely pro-abolition but this being /. let's get the science and cause/effect right...

There is already a solution... (3, Insightful)

biochozo (2700157) | about 7 months ago | (#46878197)

Nitrogen hypoxia. Cheap. 100% effective. Readily available. Doesn't torture the inmate. Why don't we use it? Apparently it's not satisfying our need for justice to equal revenge.

Couldn't they just use the euthanasia machines? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46878213)

I would think the euthanasia machines that use helium might be a viable alternative.

The fact of the matter is that the international companies that make the drug used for euthanasia will no longer allow it to be used for executions due to international pressure.

That seems to me the international community must condone hanging, electric chair, firing squad or lifetime imprisonment (because, surely, decades of mental restraint, solitary confinement and attacks/rapes by other inmates is not "torture"... Heck we treat dogs more "humanely" by putting them down using those same drugs not allowed in "executions")

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?