×

Announcing: Slashdot Deals - Explore geek apps, games, gadgets and more. (what is this?)

Thank you!

We are sorry to see you leave - Beta is different and we value the time you took to try it out. Before you decide to go, please take a look at some value-adds for Beta and learn more about it. Thank you for reading Slashdot, and for making the site better!

Opting Out of Big Data Snooping: Harder Than It Looks

timothy posted about 8 months ago | from the perhaps-you're-just-into-bottles dept.

Privacy 248

Lasrick (2629253) writes "Princeton sociologist Janet Vertesi writes about her attempt at hiding her pregnancy from 'the bots, trackers, cookies and other data sniffers online that feed the databases that companies use for targeted advertising.' Big data still found her, even though she steered clear of social media, avoided baby-related credit card purchases, and downloaded Tor to browse the Internet privately."

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Another thing found her as well (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46909637)

A FIRST POST for the bizatch

One way (2)

Ol Olsoc (1175323) | about 8 months ago | (#46909653)

Has no one learned? If you are on the net, you are known. And you are tracked.

Want to be anonymous on the web? Unplug your computer and kill it with fire.

Re:One way (1)

The New Guy 2.0 (3497907) | about 8 months ago | (#46909691)

Yep, and in the real world you're now required to carry a card with your database "primary key value" in order to get the real price, doing so otherwise causes you to "miss sales" or really "pay a surcharge".

Re:One way (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46909737)

thank god everything i put on that form was made up

Re:One way (3, Interesting)

Em Adespoton (792954) | about 8 months ago | (#46909869)

The data you put on the form has 0 value to them: it's what you purchase with the card, when, and where that they're after. They can probably figure out exactly who you are and where you live just from your purchase data.

This is why some companies will ONLY honour the actual card, and reject phone-generated codes, telling them your phone number, etc: they don't want your purchase data to get mixed up with someone else using the same tracking number.

Personally, I think they'd do better just to use a phone's MAC instead; that'd be more reliable for them than a shareable card, and the MAC would be the same across businesses for advanced data sharing opportunities.

Plus, I'd be able to randomly generate a new one whenever I wanted :)

Re:One way (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46910111)

Which is why I usually get a new card every time I visit a store. I've probably got 300+ CVS cards; and a giant stack of Safeway Club Cards at home.

Re:One way (4, Interesting)

mysidia (191772) | about 8 months ago | (#46910381)

they don't want your purchase data to get mixed up

How about we start a new fun website then.... Discount card exchange

The idea is, you signup with the site, and every few weeks, you swap your discount cards with complete strangers.

You get 50 people to stick their discount cards in a big lotto ball style shuffling contraption. And you each pull one out, so nobody is likely to wind up with the same card they put in.

Then in fact... the stores are guaranteed to get the purchase histories mixed up.

Re:One way (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46910135)

I really couldn't give two craps about some company tracking what groceries I buy.

Re:One way (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46909767)

Want to be anonymous on the web? Unplug your computer and kill it with fire.

And then hunt down every friend on facebook (even if you deleted your account) and kill their computers too. Hmmm, maybe that's not a bad idea.

Re:One way (1, Offtopic)

Ol Olsoc (1175323) | about 8 months ago | (#46909973)

Sokath, his eyes uncovered!

+100 geek cred points.

Re:One way (1)

zugmeister (1050414) | about 8 months ago | (#46910053)

lol, yeah, and +50 to everyone who gets it.

Re:One way (1)

ernar (2567515) | about 8 months ago | (#46910137)

Darmok and Jalad at Tanagra. Ernar, his mods exalted

hard, but not impossible (5, Interesting)

Geoffrey.landis (926948) | about 8 months ago | (#46910019)

I'm puzzled. The summary says " Big data still found her...", but the actual article doesn't support that statement-- she just says how hard it is to keep a secret, and that multiple big transactions makes her look criminal.

She does say that despite telling her friends not to, two people messaged her privately on Facebook... but doesn't say that the info got picked up.

I'm not & here is HOW... apk (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46910049)

http://yro.slashdot.org/commen... [slashdot.org]

* :)

Enjoy - it works, & is a 100% freebie no strings or tracking attached (better than browser addons by a MILE, & even shores up DNS redirection security issues, easily!)

APK

P.S.=> There ya go... apk

Re:One way (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46910355)

Want to be anonymous on the web? Unplug your computer and kill it with fire.

Are you crazy? That's exactly how they found Osama. The only way to escape is to behave like a frat boy on Facebook.

(n.b. you may mod this funny if you are afraid of the truth)

Re:One way (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46910435)

Untrue. I had someone who I have had no contact with on FB tag me in a pic. Said pic was seen by a cow-orker, and it made for a discussion at work the next weekday.

Not bad, but even though I could have had no FB access whatsoever, a tag is a tag, and it got picked up.

All it takes is "gee, so and so is preggers", and that gets sucked in the system.

Trying to Hide (1)

mfh (56) | about 8 months ago | (#46909655)

It's almost as if when you try to hide they get an imprint of your negative space.

Big data found her? (5, Informative)

dougisfunny (1200171) | about 8 months ago | (#46909663)

It doesn't say big data still found her anywhere in the article. She made no mention of evidence that they had, despite the Uncle sending a congratulations message on Facebook.

Was there more to story than just the article on Time where she said her measures weren't able to keep the information private?

Re:Big data found her? (1)

The New Guy 2.0 (3497907) | about 8 months ago | (#46909717)

It seems like anybody talking about this at facebook with it's amazing no-privacy policy indicates who should get hit with those ads. It's a "you can't hide!" situation.

Re:Big data found her? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46909739)

It seems like anybody talking about this at facebook with it's amazing no-privacy policy indicates who should get hit with those ads. It's a "you can't hide!" situation.

Facebook has ads?

Re:Big data found her? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46909839)

It's worse... facebook is, PUBLIC! Yep, if anybody talks about you there, all of the ad people get to see it because they are members of the public. So, the ads networks like Google's can follow you around.

Re:Big data found her? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46909959)

I heard this funny story the other day that the internet has ads.
I wounder what they were smoking when the came up with that.

Re:Big data found her? (4, Insightful)

Dutch Gun (899105) | about 8 months ago | (#46909769)

It doesn't say big data still found her anywhere in the article. She made no mention of evidence that they had, despite the Uncle sending a congratulations message on Facebook.

Was there more to story than just the article on Time where she said her measures weren't able to keep the information private?

Yeah, I saw nothing that said big data found her at all. Instead, I gleaned that she ended up acting pretty damn rude to her relatives who inadvertently broke her self-imposed techology exile, although I noted she didn't close down her Facebook account.

She concludes by complaining about the data-collection agencies, essentially blaming them after she behaved rudely to her family and friends, and launches into a weird conspiratorial rant about how her husband spotted a sign behind a checkout counter stating the company "“reserves the right to limit the daily amount of prepaid card purchases and has an obligation to report excessive transactions to the authorities", and then goes on to talk about how this (plus using Tor) made them feel like criminals. Huh? She then exclaims that Obama's report on data collection practices can't come soon enough, because... uh, what will that report do exactly?

While I'm not exactly on the side of these advertisement companies, the author clearly performed this experiment and wrote the article with a definite agenda in mind, and drew some somewhat odd and conspiratorial-sounding conclusions about the ordeal. It feels like she obfuscated the fact (not helped by the Slashdot summary) that her efforts did indeed pay off, and that apparently no commercial companies found out she was pregnant.

That being said... in most cases (there are exceptions, as the article points out), do women care if an advertisement agency finds out she's pregnant? As soon as I bought a home, I got a lot of homeowner-related advertisement. That was fine with me, as the ads were more relevant to my interests, and it's not something I had intended to be a secret. I understand the principle of the thing, but every technology we gain has its tradeoffs. The web is largely funded by advertisement. We pay with a lack of anonymity and privacy, which seem to be what most people prefer, as evidenced by the success of Facebook. Overall, I still think we benefit a lot more than we lose from the connectivity and persistence of our online world.

Re:Big data found her? (2, Informative)

khasim (1285) | about 8 months ago | (#46909805)

Yeah, I saw nothing that said big data found her at all.

Seconded. There should have been SOMETHING like "after which I was inundated with baby-related advertisements".

And trying to hide it while buying baby stuff on AMAZON?!?
?!?
one more time
?!?

I lied. One more time.
?!?

Amazon knows what you bought.
Amazon knows who you are.
Amazon knows where you had it shipped.

Re:Big data found her? (2)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 8 months ago | (#46909863)

I think you're right an all, but I can't get over just how bad these guys are at things. Buy a car, hundreds of ads about buying a car (hint, I already bought one, you see). Have a friend that's pregnant? Get hundreds of ads about 'your pregnancy'. Sorry guys, if you haven't figured out I'm a middle aged male, you're in more trouble than you realize.

It has to work at some level, else they wouldn't do it. But for fun, on a slow week, hit up Amazon for anything transgendered or gay. Better yet, use the login on the guy at work that you don't like much.

Re:Big data found her? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46909943)

The biggest problem I have with these ads are that they are almost NEVER what I'm interest in. As you said buy a car and they should instead give you ads of what fun you can have with gismo X for your new car, but No, "new cars over here!" is what you get.

It's no wonder ad sales have been declining for some time now. Better to try if you like that then this might also be interesting, you'd make a lot more sales I'm sure.

Re:Big data found her? (1)

WaffleMonster (969671) | about 8 months ago | (#46910129)

and drew some somewhat odd and conspiratorial-sounding conclusions about the ordeal.

What is odd about noting "dual use" nature of services used to conceal ones identity?

http://info.publicintelligence... [publicintelligence.net]

Re:Big data found her? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46910343)

that PDF is ridiculous, who it is aimed at? many of those items are unverifiable, like how can somebody determine that the person sitting next to them on at the internet cafe has "traveled an illogical distance to use the internet cafe"? how about verifying somebody using cards on different names?
Information about electronics? hydrogen peroxide? (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrogen_peroxide#Domestic_uses) or acetone? (the nail polishing liquid?)

Law enforcement should not be spreading FUD, sometimes "less is more", and it would have been better to keep that to themselves instead of trying to have the random Joe determine if he has to call the FBI because he saw he person sitting next to him at the internet cafe logging into AOL, talking over Skype, playing a game, buying nail polishing (for his wife maybe?) and paying in cash.

rudeness butts into common sense (2)

epine (68316) | about 8 months ago | (#46910297)

essentially blaming them after she behaved rudely to her family and friends

Apparently one person's "rude" is another person's common sense. (Invocation of "blame" is another red flag that common sense has left the building.) 100% of the rudeness here derives from unbalanced technology, because Facebook wants it that way.

Entire countries filter the internet. Yet as an individual, it's not practical for me to contract a public identity management agency which allows me to enact controls over what personal information I'm willing to see splattered into the public space on malign service hosts.

Nothing should go onto your social media pages that doesn't first go through your own appointed screening filter, if you choose to have one.

Had such an option been available, her personally appointed screening filter would have simply bouncing back a message to her uncle to the effect that "Janet doesn't wish to see her reproductive status conveyed on cloud services".

It's not rude. It's common sense.

Re:rudeness butts into common sense (2)

Dutch Gun (899105) | about 8 months ago | (#46910463)

I'm guessing you didn't read the article.

"For example, seven months in, my uncle sent me a Facebook message, congratulating me on my pregnancy. My response was downright rude: I deleted the thread and unfriended him immediately. When I emailed to ask why he did it, he explained, “I didn’t put it on your wall.” Another family member who reached out on Facebook chat a few weeks later exclaimed, “I didn’t know that a private message wasn’t private!”"

And again:

"But avoiding the big data dragnet meant that I not only looked like a rude family member or an inconsiderate friend, I also looked like a bad citizen."

I'm not the one claiming she acted rudely. She states it herself twice in the article.

Note I'm not defending the behavior of the ad companies here. However, if she was really serious about wanting privacy about that sort of thing, I would think the common-sense course of action would be to stay off Facebook completely. Everyone knows that whatever you do there is mined mercilessly for data, but there's absolutely no reason one has to be on there, other than they *enjoy the features of the service* (this author apparently included). Likewise, there's zero reason you HAVE to shop online or pay for items with a credit card if you don't want to. You also don't have to give your real name or phone number for getting a "discount card" at most shops - that's entirely optional, in my experience (and I don't).

The article just sounded like much ado about nothing to me, that's all. It was her nine-month sociology experiment, and she wrote up the results to be as dramatic as possible - a very first world problem, in other words.

Re:Big data found her? (1)

mysidia (191772) | about 8 months ago | (#46910405)

essentially blaming them after she behaved rudely to her family and friends

No. Her family and friends behaved rudely and violated her trust in failing to respect her decision that the information is not to be posted on social networks.

Re:Big data found her? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46909833)

It doesn't say big data still found her anywhere in the article. She made no mention of evidence that they had, despite the Uncle sending a congratulations message on Facebook.

Was there more to story than just the article on Time where she said her measures weren't able to keep the information private?

Good point, the headline to the article says "My Experiment Opting Out of Big Data Made Me Look Like a Criminal", and that is the main thrust of the story. Who'd have thought that slashdot could write an innacururate summary, maybe Lazrick included a link that didn't make it? Probably not though.

Re:Big data found her? (1)

BradMajors (995624) | about 8 months ago | (#46910289)

Google knows. At sometime she must have sent an email to someone with a gmail address or called someone that used google voice and mentioned pregnancy. There is no way for her to know if her telephone call was being monitored and transcribed by google voice.

I'm sorry, we just can't allow that! (1)

The New Guy 2.0 (3497907) | about 8 months ago | (#46909673)

We also need better tracking of men who make women pregnant! See, for a first child, she's going to go through things she's never experienced before. They need to learn the Gerber brand, need to learn what diapers are about, told what's current at Toys 'R Us (are their any competitors left?) and more.

Sorry, you just can't opt out of that one. If you don't want it online, it's going to land in your mailbox.

Re:I'm sorry, we just can't allow that! (1)

Em Adespoton (792954) | about 8 months ago | (#46909901)

We also need better tracking of men who make women pregnant! See, for a first child, she's going to go through things she's never experienced before. They need to learn the Gerber brand, need to learn what diapers are about, told what's current at Toys 'R Us (are their any competitors left?) and more.

Sorry, you just can't opt out of that one. If you don't want it online, it's going to land in your mailbox.

That's why I search for baby names, cribs and daycares every 9 months or so. Surprisingly, they've stopped sending me "special deals" by email and mailbox; I guess they figure that after every 9 months for 15 years but with 0 purchases except as gifts, I'm probably not their target market.

I should have checked the F box on those surveys come to think of it... that'd have confused them even more.

welcome to the panopticon. (1, Interesting)

rogoshen1 (2922505) | about 8 months ago | (#46909681)

:(

That this is news to anyone is interesting.

First the advertisers will stalk us, then the government will, then the revolution? (or more likely, circus and bread intensifies, and idiocracy results.)

They can't stalk me (here's how)... apk (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46910069)

http://yro.slashdot.org/commen... [slashdot.org]

* :)

Enjoy - it works, & is a 100% freebie no strings or tracking attached (better than browser addons by a MILE, & even shores up DNS redirection security issues, easily!)

APK

P.S.=> There ya go... apk

others about you (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46909685)

"But social interactions online are not just about what you say, but what others say about you."

Thats one of the reasons why I have no facebook or any other social network. If I can't control what happens with my data when they are in the internet (which others like the MPAA and Erdogan don't realize), and I can't control whether my data come online, I have no other option than to minimize my online presence.

Re:others about you (2)

pigiron (104729) | about 8 months ago | (#46909721)

Who cares? Block all tracking javascripts and use ad and pop-up/animated gif blockers and you will never see their advertisements when you browse.

It's easy enough to throw all junk mail away without even reading it when it comes to snail mail in your mailbox.

Re:others about you (3, Insightful)

Teun (17872) | about 8 months ago | (#46909741)

Indeed, what others write.

For obvious reasons I don't have a Facebook or Twitter account yet Facebook mailed me with the positive message I should join them so I could communicate with good friends like *name1*, *name2* and *name3*.

Meaning my daft sister and a somewhat remote cousin/journalist had stupidly and carelessly dumped their adress books on Facebook who dutyfully analised their input for links and found me as a common point.
I have cursed both and written Facebook I was not impressed by their spying.

Strange enough they did supply a link where I could free myself from receiving further mails from them.
But for eternety I'll be watched by them and those they deal with, see my sig.

Re:others about you (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 8 months ago | (#46909885)

You do realize that being an AC and as such, the most prolific, mentally maladjusted and developmentally compromised persona on the largest un-social network on the web gets you tracked by every governmental organization on all seven continents.

They're watching you.

Re:others about you (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46910255)

"They're watching you."

Good! And now they're watching you!

Re:others about you (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46910325)

Right now, I feel that I am more affected by results from corporate spying than by the results of governmental spying.

Re:others about you (2)

Em Adespoton (792954) | about 8 months ago | (#46909917)

"But social interactions online are not just about what you say, but what others say about you."

Thats one of the reasons why I have no facebook or any other social network. If I can't control what happens with my data when they are in the internet (which others like the MPAA and Erdogan don't realize), and I can't control whether my data come online, I have no other option than to minimize my online presence.

Having no social media accounts just means that your social media profile hasn't been confirmed and associated with a credit report, not that it doesn't exist. For it to not exist, you need to ensure that everyone else who uses social media doesn't know you exist.

Her Very First Action Doomed Her (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46909745)

Pay in cash and don't use loyalty cards works for in-store purchases. The Amazon gift card thing could work only if her husband bought them in cash and didn't fuck up by using his debit or credit card. Using TOR to try and keep advertisers away from her online presence works fairly well.

The very first thing she did wrong in trying to keep this private is ultimately what would ensure she got found out - it was opening her fucking mouth to her family and friends. "Always keep your mouth shut and never rat out your friends..."

Re:Her Very First Action Doomed Her (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46909853)

Even worse, the tracking is so bad we're discussing her on Slashdot!

Totalitarian (2)

alexo (9335) | about 8 months ago | (#46909859)

From TFA:

a warning sign behind the cashier informed him that the store “reserves the right to limit the daily amount of prepaid card purchases and has an obligation to report excessive transactions to the authorities.”

If that is not a sign of a totalitarian state, I don't know what is.

Uhh (1)

StripedCow (776465) | about 8 months ago | (#46909755)

and downloaded Tor to browse the Internet privately

Of course, unless she establishes a new exit node every time she visits a new website, and uses a browser with a different fingerprint each time, it is still possible to track her browsing behavior.

Re:Uhh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46909815)

Of course, unless she establishes a new exit node every time she visits a new website, and uses a browser with a different fingerprint each time, it is still possible to track her browsing behavior.

The exit node (as the whole route) is randomly chosen every time she starts TOR, and gets swapped all 10 Minutes. To minimize her fingerprint, she should use TBB, as there the TOR team has made huge efforts to remove fingerprintable information. For example, the user agent is hardwired to Windows 7 I think, and the size of the browser window is sent rounded.

Re:Uhh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46910397)

Take the dick out of your ass and learn how tor works.

End to end routes are constantly (10 minutes by default, this is configurable) being changed and rearranged. As far as browser fingerprinting goes, the best thing to fo is make sure everybody looks exactly the same, perhaps by using something designed for specific tor usage, say tails.

Still, in the grand scheme of things it means fuck all. If "they" want you tracked, istalling tor won't be stopping them from doing it.

yep (5, Insightful)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about 8 months ago | (#46909765)

I've worked with this software in the past. You can't hide from it, period. I even saw one that considered TOR browser as a data point to help identify you. Even staying off the net wont help. They have deals with your grocery store, walmart, your car dealership, everything... They get all your data all the time. Our only saving grace right now is its so much detailed information they don't even know what to do with it all. They can send you adds that might better appeal to you, but other than that they're not really sure what else to do. I suspect that at some point, someone will figure out how to do horrible things with this kind of information, and then this will suck.

go off the grid (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46909921)

Well going completely off the grid might be impossible, but paying retail with cash and sharing your web-surfing devices with other people (e.g., your wife and kids) tends to confuse most tracking algorithms enough that they are merely an annoyance instead of being scary...

Re:yep (1)

The New Guy 2.0 (3497907) | about 8 months ago | (#46909951)

TOR has so few users that you're going to end up being identified as "Oh, you're the one visitor I have that's using TOR!"

Re:yep (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46910017)

"TOR has so few users that you're going to end up being identified as "Oh, you're the one visitor I have that's using TOR!"

Actually, when you visit EFF's panopticlick while using Tor, you have a common user agent, versus a non-Tor browser which is very unique. Yes, the exit node IP gives you away, but there are countermeasures.

One solution is to use Startpage's free web proxy, especially through Tor. They spoof your user agent which changes often.

Tor has a lot of users:

http://metrics.torproject.org/ [torproject.org]

Sadly though recently a lot of bots have appeared, skewing the results.

EFF testing new Privacy Badger tool (5, Informative)

Freshly Exhumed (105597) | about 8 months ago | (#46909789)

EFF is launching a new extension for Firefox and Chrome called Privacy Badger. Privacy Badger automatically detects and blocks spying ads around the Web, and the invisible trackers that feed information to them.

https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/... [eff.org]

Re:Privacy Badger tool (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46909907)

Already submitted:

http://beta.slashdot.org/submi... [slashdot.org]

but never made FP.

Re:Privacy Badger tool (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46909915)

also made it to FP at:

SN: http://soylentnews.org/article... [soylentnews.org]
PD: http://pipedot.org/story/2014-... [pipedot.org]

C'mon, posts about freakin VHS tapes on the FP at least twice in the same day but this news is ignored?

Re:Privacy Badger tool (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46909935)

Resubmitted:

http://slashdot.org/submission... [slashdot.org]

Re:EFF testing new Privacy Badger tool (2)

The New Guy 2.0 (3497907) | about 8 months ago | (#46909937)

Already tried and failed... it ends up with your IP address being tracked instead of your cookie... no way out from that one, and some news sites might stop serving you news for that one.

Re:EFF testing new Privacy Badger tool (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46910315)

Problem with IP tracking is that on CGNAT systems, it fails spectacularly.

Browser addons = WEAK vs. hosts (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46910083)

Hosts do more w/ less (1 file) @ a faster level (ring 0) vs redundant browser addons (slowing up slower ring 3 browsers) via filtering 4 the IP stack (coded in C, loads w/ OS, & 1st net resolver queried w\ 45++ yrs.of optimization):

---

APK Hosts File Engine 9.0++ 32/64-bit:

http://start64.com/index.php?o... [start64.com]

(Details of hosts' benefits enumerated in link)

Summary:

---

A. ) Hosts do more than AdBlock ("souled-out" 2 Google/Crippled by default) + Ghostery (Advertiser owned) - "Fox guards henhouse", or Request Policy -> http://yro.slashdot.org/commen... [slashdot.org]

B. ) Hosts add reliability vs. downed or redirected DNS + secure vs. known malicious domains too -> http://tech.slashdot.org/comme... [slashdot.org] w/ less added "moving parts" complexity + room 4 breakdown,

C. ) Hosts files yield more speed (blocks ads & hardcodes fav sites - faster than remote DNS), security (vs. malicious domains serving mal-content + block spam/phish), reliability (vs. downed or Kaminsky redirect vulnerable DNS, 99% = unpatched vs. it & worst @ ISP level + weak vs FastFlux + DynDNS botnets), & anonymity (vs. dns request logs + DNSBL's).

---

* Addons are more complex + slowup browsers in message passing (use a few concurrently - you'll see) - Addons slowdown SLOWER usermode browsers layering on MORE: I work w/ what you have in kernelmode, via hosts ( A tightly integrated PART of the IP stack itself )

APK

P.S.=> Currently adding 2 features to it:

1.) 'Shearing away' tracker you CAN'T see, via code techniques that emulate a netstat -ano albeit on an automated timer to do so, as I did here on slashdot (much like how "PEERBLOCK" operates, but, not using ADDED COMPLEXITY laying in a filtering driver, but instead, using the native Windows firewall, creating rulesets for that much too)

AND

2.) Making it FASTER on its slowest part (Convert & Filter) by breaking the file into 100 parts (which process FASTER already than doing the single large intake I do currently) by August!

... apk

Re:Browser addons = WEAK vs. hosts (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46910171)

All they can do is downmod you apk but they can't prove you wrong.

I know (it's great - why? Simple...) (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46910437)

Why they'd troll me with failing ad hominem attack attempts or downmodding me "hit & run" (yet NEVER ever disproving my points in favor of custom hosts giving users of them more SPEED, SECURITY, RELIABILITY, & even ANONYMITY online) etc. used to boggle my mind.

It's a good program -> http://start64.com/index.php?o... [start64.com] that does the job & offers the benefits I enumerate in its download link.

HOWEVER - It doesn't boggle my mind anymore why trolls here do:

Obviously those doing it aremalware makers/botnet masters (I block them refreshed daily from 12 reputable & reliable sources in the security community), advertisers (I block their ads which steal speed you PAID for & infect you with malicious scripts + track you), inferior competitors (Ghostery/AdBlock/RequestPolicy), or webmasters (Pissed I block ads - they're being exploited + I held off on letting my app out (not anymore after that)) & it isn't "Souled-Out" INFERIOR (Adblock & Ghostery) & it shores up security faults in DNS & speeds up resolution of your fav. sites hardcoded in it (faster than remote DNS lookups + secures you vs. DNS request logs + DNSBL)

APK

P.S.=> Well, they're going to do that regardless of their transparent WEAK bullshit - so I just post it again (as I have NO POSTING LIMITS unlike other 'ac' posters here - so they'll run "dry" of their modpoints for unjustifiable downmods, & will be "outta gas" - but, I won't EVER be, & they know it so I just post it again - no more *trying* to vainly "hide" my posts (which most here see anyhow)... lmao! They're idiots trying to do futile b.s., that's all...

.. apk

Re:Browser addons = WEAK vs. hosts (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about 8 months ago | (#46910183)

Oh no, not Another Piece of Krap again!

You're MORE THAN WELCOME (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46910217)

To validly technically disprove 17 points in favor of hosts listed here http://start64.com/index.php?o... [start64.com] proving how hosts give users more SPEED, SECURITY, RELIABILITY, & even ANONYMITY... ok?

* :)

Thing is?

Well, look at your bullshit reply!

Heck - I know DAMN WELL you can't... lol!

Since "the best you got" = bogus downmods + weak futile effete failed ad hominem attack attempts - nothing more!

(Both of which dimwits like you used here, no biggie, I just post it again as I have NO POSTING LIMITS even as an AC here)

However -you & those LIKE you troll, never EVER disprove my points validly!

APK

P.S.=> Thanks - since fools like YOU make ME look GOOD & yourselves by way of comparison? Well, lol - "not so good"...

.... apk

Re:EFF testing new Privacy Badger tool (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46910145)

wtf is wrong with adblock (with or without noscript).. gotta be better than this.

Custom hosts files blow away AdBlock... apk (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46910153)

http://yro.slashdot.org/commen... [slashdot.org]

* FACT!

APK

P.S.=> Adblock 'souled-out' to advertisers - they should call it "ALMOST ALL ADS BLOCKED" now because of that (with their default letting google ads etc. through) & it doesn't DO A FRACTION OF WHAT HOSTS CAN for added speed, security, reliability, or anonymity... apk

Browser addons = WEAK vs. hosts files (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46910163)

Hosts do more w/ less (1 file) @ a faster level (ring 0) vs redundant browser addons (slowing up slower ring 3 browsers) via filtering 4 the IP stack (coded in C, loads w/ OS, & 1st net resolver queried w\ 45++ yrs.of optimization):

---

APK Hosts File Engine 9.0++ 32/64-bit:

http://start64.com/index.php?o... [start64.com]

(Details of hosts' benefits enumerated in link)

Summary:

---

A. ) Hosts do more than AdBlock ("souled-out" 2 Google/Crippled by default) + Ghostery (Advertiser owned) - "Fox guards henhouse", or Request Policy -> http://yro.slashdot.org/commen... [slashdot.org]

B. ) Hosts add reliability vs. downed or redirected DNS + secure vs. known malicious domains too -> http://tech.slashdot.org/comme... [slashdot.org] w/ less added "moving parts" complexity + room 4 breakdown,

C. ) Hosts files yield more speed (blocks ads & hardcodes fav sites - faster than remote DNS), security (vs. malicious domains serving mal-content + block spam/phish), reliability (vs. downed or Kaminsky redirect vulnerable DNS, 99% = unpatched vs. it & worst @ ISP level + weak vs FastFlux + DynDNS botnets), & anonymity (vs. dns request logs + DNSBL's).

---

* Addons are more complex + slowup browsers in message passing (use a few concurrently - you'll see) - Addons slowdown SLOWER usermode browsers layering on MORE: I work w/ what you have in kernelmode, via hosts ( A tightly integrated PART of the IP stack itself )

APK

P.S.=> Currently adding 2 features to it:

1.) 'Shearing away' tracker you CAN'T see, via code techniques that emulate a netstat -ano albeit on an automated timer to do so, as I did here on slashdot (much like how "PEERBLOCK" operates, but, not using ADDED COMPLEXITY laying in a filtering driver, but instead, using the native Windows firewall, creating rulesets for that much too)

AND

2.) Making it FASTER on its slowest part (Convert & Filter) by breaking the file into 100 parts (which process FASTER already than doing the single large intake I do currently) by August!

... apk

if she wanted safety (1)

ozduo (2043408) | about 8 months ago | (#46909807)

she should have worn tin foil over her baby bump!

Cash is King (1)

mrflash818 (226638) | about 8 months ago | (#46909821)

Buying things with cash and not using membership/credit/debit cards, is about the best we can hope for, if we do not what our purchases and lives tracked.

Likely this using-cash-only anonymity costs more, as well as the inconvenience(?) of not making any internet purchases.

Really seems a truism, that "anonymity isn't free."

Re:Cash is NOT King anymore (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46909889)

All bill numbers are recorded as they leave ATM machine and the cash flow is tracked. Pay using your body or offer services instead.

Re:Cash is NOT King anymore (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46909927)

Citation needed!

Re:Cash is NOT King anymore (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about 8 months ago | (#46910191)

I have a vision...I see people starting randomly exchanging banknotes on the streets!

Re:Cash is NOT King anymore (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46910389)

Hey bigmouth: You're being called out http://slashdot.org/comments.p... [slashdot.org]

Re:Cash is NOT King anymore (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46910431)

PARTYVAN!

Re:Cash is King (1)

RJFerret (1279530) | about 8 months ago | (#46910015)

Likely this using-cash-only anonymity costs more...

Huh? *tilts head, why might that be a presumption? In my case cash saves lots annually...

About 15% discount for cash at one of my car repair shops, 10% discount at the closer/less expensive one.

Discount for cash on rent.

Discount for cash with every service person I've ever had do work for me (plumbers, roofing, furnace repair, appliances, etc.) Heck, just yesterday, tow truck...who also offered a post-payment lift wherever I wanted to go afterward.

Card price is 4% more at many gas stations, although Discover gives 2% of that back to you, cash is 2% less than that (if you are at a station that doesn't charge different prices, that just means the cash buyers are subsidizing the card fees).

The only places I can think of that don't discount for cash that I regular pay for locally would be haircut, groceries and box store type purchases, but if there's still a local shop instead of Home Despot or BLowes, they are typically cheaper/better quality and discount for cash (thankfully there are still plumbing shops around here, if not general hardware stores anymore).

Heck, local property taxes are more via card, but same check/cash, so no discount truly there.

Normal things for North Korea and USA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46909873)

Don't expect to hide any of your activities in regimes like North Korea or USA. Just last week landed in New York and was terrified by the amount of security forces on the streets. They are everywhere!!!
In kindergardens, grocery stores, parking lots and cars are buzzing through the streets to remind, american enslaved people who is in power.

Please explain this to me... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46909887)

I do not use my real name on any service.

I use "perk" cards but do not use my real name or info on them. And if I use them, I pay in cash. Or loan them out to 3-4 other friends as well.

I don't use cookies, and keep my browser locked down.

I use a vpn.

If I must register something, I do it with a pseudonym. (And have MANY different ones just for this reason.)

So just how accurate and good is tracking going to be with me?

Re:Please explain this to me... (4, Insightful)

kruach aum (1934852) | about 8 months ago | (#46909945)

Very, because your name is completely irrelevant. Imagine you want to know everything about penguins. You look at what they do all day, where they eat, where they hunt, which other penguins they hang out with, where they shit, whether they have eggs, who looks after the egg at what time, what kind of fish they're eating, what color their shit is, on and on and on. At that point, what extra information would a name give you? It would tell you absolutely nothing. You can assign the name yourself, just to ease the process of telling penguins apart. That the name didn't come from the penguins directly doesn't matter in the slightest.

Names are not how Big Data tracks you. They simply look at what connections are made from where to where at what time, and assign labels to the points where information flows from, and where information flows to. One of those points refers to you, and if they're any good, to your smart-phone, laptop, toaster, and all other internet-enabled devices you use as well.

Re:Please explain this to me... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46910059)

Ok, so, I have fairly diverse set of net only connections. People I have never, nor never will meet. And they do not know my actual name.

I do not have a phone. If I need to call I either 1. borrow a friend's cell, or 2. use a skype phone that's married to a fake acct.

I dump my browser info after every session and sandbox while using.

And I actively create disinformation about what little I can find about myself online.

So is it still "very" accurate? I'm honestly curious how I could do better? Any tips would be very much appreciated.

Wrong summary and silly article (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46909929)

Quite frankly, this woman is considerably naive, and not a little bit daft. Once she told her relatives the cat was instantly out of the bag, as anybody with a single functional neuron should have expected. At any rate, there is no evidence that 'big data' or 'clever algorithms' caught her. Her article amounts to rambling about nothing.

Re:Wrong summary and silly article (1)

kruach aum (1934852) | about 8 months ago | (#46909957)

From a sociologist? Surely you jest.

Re:Wrong summary and silly article (1)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | about 8 months ago | (#46909971)

She's a faculty member - so right there you know here connection to the real world is pretty tenuous.

(No, I am not attempting to make a joke. I work with faculty every day)

Re:Wrong summary and silly article (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46910327)

(No, I am not attempting to make a joke. I work with faculty every day)

Thus displaying that your connection to the real world is also rather tenuous.

Re:Wrong summary and silly article (1)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | about 8 months ago | (#46910345)

Woah. Mind blown.

Big Data snoop infects everything, check your TV (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46909955)

The latest firmware update from LG for their Smart TVs includes a 'privacy' policy that requires you to allow them to track what TV channels you watch, your voice (it is recorded) if you have a voice activated remote, any apps you use, any movies you stream...the list goes on.

Decline the agreement and they disable pretty much everything, including services like Netflix and Amazon, though they also say in their ToS that these 3rd party services are outside of LG's control and have their own ToS to agree to. Getting to the point where you will have to agree to an anal exam to buy pants.

I beat those "anal exams" on PC's & Servers (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46910113)

Smartphones too, via -> http://yro.slashdot.org/commen... [slashdot.org] :)

Enjoy - it works, & is a 100% freebie no strings or tracking attached (better than browser addons by a MILE, & even shores up DNS redirection security issues, easily!)

APK

P.S.=> There ya go... apk

Big data existed before the internet (5, Interesting)

wiredlogic (135348) | about 8 months ago | (#46909969)

Acxiom has been doing this for decades before the web existed. If you spend money electronically they have a record of when, where, and what you purchased. With a sufficient enough sample of data they can determine interesting things about people like when they're likely to be pregnant or menstruating or any number of other characteristics marketers can use to improve their chances of a sale. For instance, if women are more likely to buy certain products at certain parts of their cycle then a marketer can synchronize their junk mailing to coincide with the the optimum time for them to be most receptive to spend their money on something. Yes, this really happens.

You have to disconnect from the internet AND spend cash only AND never use loyalty cards AND hope no one you do business with still sells your information to a data broker to be able to hide from them. Tor alone won't cut it.

Improperly configured TorBrowser and Addons? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46909979)

This puff piece imo sounds like a fishing expedition to uncover skilled privacy/security experts or anyone interested in encrypted communications.

Bottom line is if you don't know what the fuck you're doing (especially if you use TBB or TAILS out of the box without tweaking the default settings) don't use it.

So stay offline (2)

HockeyPuck (141947) | about 8 months ago | (#46910013)

So for 9months:

Pay for your prenatal supplies with cash.
Don't surf the web for anything related to pregnancy or children.
Surf the web for chainsaws and snowblowers.
Read books.
Read Newspapers made from paper.
Read Magazines made from paper.
Buy them at the local store in cash.
Don't give them your "Frequent Shopper Card"
Stay offline.

Not so tough.

Why? Stopping trackers = EASY (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46910125)

On PC's & Servers (smartphones too) http://yro.slashdot.org/commen... [slashdot.org] :)

Enjoy - it works, & is a 100% freebie no strings or tracking attached (better than browser addons by a MILE, & even shores up DNS redirection security issues, easily!)

APK

P.S.=> There ya go - it works, using what you have NATIVELY (not "piling on" more complexity + room for breakdown with SLOWER usermode messagepassing overheads bound browser addons that don't do a FRACTION of what hosts can do)... apk

Re:Why? Stopping trackers = EASY (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46910333)

That's quite some dedication you've got there. Reply, control-v, preview, save.

Re: So stay offline (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46910301)

And then your hospital sells your name (and baby's) to the marketers.

I beat it all using custom hosts files (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46910027)

Hosts do more w/ less (1 file) @ a faster level (ring 0) vs redundant browser addons (slowing up slower ring 3 browsers) via filtering 4 the IP stack (coded in C, loads w/ OS, & 1st net resolver queried w\ 45++ yrs.of optimization):

---

APK Hosts File Engine 9.0++ 32/64-bit:

http://start64.com/index.php?o... [start64.com]

(Details of hosts' benefits enumerated in link)

Summary:

---

A. ) Hosts do more than AdBlock ("souled-out" 2 Google/Crippled by default) + Ghostery (Advertiser owned) - "Fox guards henhouse", or Request Policy -> http://yro.slashdot.org/commen... [slashdot.org]

B. ) Hosts add reliability vs. downed or redirected DNS + secure vs. known malicious domains too -> http://tech.slashdot.org/comme... [slashdot.org] w/ less added "moving parts" complexity + room 4 breakdown,

C. ) Hosts files yield more speed (blocks ads & hardcodes fav sites - faster than remote DNS), security (vs. malicious domains serving mal-content + block spam/phish), reliability (vs. downed or Kaminsky redirect vulnerable DNS, 99% = unpatched vs. it & worst @ ISP level + weak vs FastFlux + DynDNS botnets), & anonymity (vs. dns request logs + DNSBL's).

---

* Addons are more complex + slowup browsers in message passing (use a few concurrently - you'll see) - Addons slowdown SLOWER usermode browsers layering on MORE: I work w/ what you have in kernelmode, via hosts ( A tightly integrated PART of the IP stack itself )

APK

P.S.=> Currently adding 2 features to it:

1.) 'Shearing away' tracker you CAN'T see, via code techniques that emulate a netstat -ano albeit on an automated timer to do so, as I did here on slashdot (much like how "PEERBLOCK" operates, but, not using ADDED COMPLEXITY laying in a filtering driver, but instead, using the native Windows firewall, creating rulesets for that much too)

AND

2.) Making it FASTER on its slowest part (Convert & Filter) by breaking the file into 100 parts (which process FASTER already than doing the single large intake I do currently) by August!

... apk

Re:I beat it all using custom hosts files (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46910195)

Apk all they have is unjustifiable downmods but they can't prove you wrong. You're winning man.

I know (it's great)... apk (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46910419)

Why they'd troll me with failing ad hominem attack attempts or downmodding me "hit & run" (yet NEVER ever disproving my points in favor of custom hosts giving users of them more SPEED, SECURITY, RELIABILITY, & even ANONYMITY online) etc. used to boggle my mind.

It's a good program -> http://start64.com/index.php?o... [start64.com] that does the job & offers the benefits I enumerate in its download link.

HOWEVER - It doesn't boggle my mind anymore why trolls here do:

Obviously those doing it aremalware makers/botnet masters (I block them refreshed daily from 12 reputable & reliable sources in the security community), advertisers (I block their ads which steal speed you PAID for & infect you with malicious scripts + track you), inferior competitors (Ghostery/AdBlock/RequestPolicy), or webmasters (Pissed I block ads - they're being exploited + I held off on letting my app out (not anymore after that)) & it isn't "Souled-Out" INFERIOR (Adblock & Ghostery) & it shores up security faults in DNS & speeds up resolution of your fav. sites hardcoded in it (faster than remote DNS lookups + secures you vs. DNS request logs + DNSBL)

APK

P.S.=> Well, they're going to do that regardless of their transparent WEAK bullshit - so I just post it again (as I have NO POSTING LIMITS unlike other 'ac' posters here - so they'll run "dry" of their modpoints for unjustifiable downmods, & will be "outta gas" - but, I won't EVER be, & they know it so I just post it again - no more *trying* to vainly "hide" my posts (which most here see anyhow)... lmao! They're idiots trying to do futile b.s., that's all...

.. apk

huh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46910097)

I dont even attempt to hide myself and i feel im not tracked at all.

I beat trackers easily (hosts files)... apk (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46910185)

Hosts do more w/ less (1 file) @ a faster level (ring 0) vs redundant browser addons (slowing up slower ring 3 browsers) via filtering 4 the IP stack (coded in C, loads w/ OS, & 1st net resolver queried w\ 45++ yrs.of optimization):

---

APK Hosts File Engine 9.0++ 32/64-bit:

http://start64.com/index.php?o... [start64.com]

(Details of hosts' benefits enumerated in link)

Summary:

---

A. ) Hosts do more than AdBlock ("souled-out" 2 Google/Crippled by default) + Ghostery (Advertiser owned) - "Fox guards henhouse", or Request Policy -> http://yro.slashdot.org/commen... [slashdot.org]

B. ) Hosts add reliability vs. downed or redirected DNS + secure vs. known malicious domains too -> http://tech.slashdot.org/comme... [slashdot.org] w/ less added "moving parts" complexity + room 4 breakdown,

C. ) Hosts files yield more speed (blocks ads & hardcodes fav sites - faster than remote DNS), security (vs. malicious domains serving mal-content + block spam/phish), reliability (vs. downed or Kaminsky redirect vulnerable DNS, 99% = unpatched vs. it & worst @ ISP level + weak vs FastFlux + DynDNS botnets), & anonymity (vs. dns request logs + DNSBL's).

---

* Addons are more complex + slowup browsers in message passing (use a few concurrently - you'll see) - Addons slowdown SLOWER usermode browsers layering on MORE: I work w/ what you have in kernelmode, via hosts ( A tightly integrated PART of the IP stack itself )

APK

P.S.=> Currently adding 2 features to it:

1.) 'Shearing away' tracker you CAN'T see, via code techniques that emulate a netstat -ano albeit on an automated timer to do so, as I did here on slashdot (much like how "PEERBLOCK" operates, but, not using ADDED COMPLEXITY laying in a filtering driver, but instead, using the native Windows firewall, creating rulesets for that much too)

AND

2.) Making it FASTER on its slowest part (Convert & Filter) by breaking the file into 100 parts (which process FASTER already than doing the single large intake I do currently) by August!

... apk

one man's data is another man's information (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46910189)

What until they can get all consumable water in bottles. And then tagged bottles spells the end of privacy.

And pulling your own ground water will be useless from the fracking unless you build a refinery.

So how did she hide again? (1)

wjcofkc (964165) | about 8 months ago | (#46910221)

This "sociologist of technology" (self proclaimed?) might want to go back to school. As far as I am aware, even if you use TOR and gift cards, and have you stuff shipped to a po box, you still need a legit account with a name, in which case off goes your private data.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?