×

Announcing: Slashdot Deals - Explore geek apps, games, gadgets and more. (what is this?)

Thank you!

We are sorry to see you leave - Beta is different and we value the time you took to try it out. Before you decide to go, please take a look at some value-adds for Beta and learn more about it. Thank you for reading Slashdot, and for making the site better!

Canadian Teen Arrested For Calling In 30+ Swattings, Bomb Threats

Unknown Lamer posted about 7 months ago | from the stick-to-trolling-the-internet dept.

Crime 350

tsu doh nimh (609154) writes "A 16-year-old male from Ottawa, Canada has been arrested for allegedly making at least 30 fraudulent callsincluding bomb threats and 'swattings' — to emergency services across North America over the past few months. Canadian media isn't identifying the youth because of laws that prevent the disclosure, but the alleged perpetrator was outed in a dox on Pastebin that was picked up by journalist Brian Krebs, who was twice the recipient of attempted swat raids at the hand of this kid. From the story: 'I told this user privately that targeting an investigative reporter maybe wasn't the brightest idea, and that he was likely to wind up in jail soon. But @ProbablyOnion was on a roll: That same day, he hung out his for-hire sign on Twitter, with the following message: "want someone swatted? Tweet me their name, address and I'll make it happen."'"

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

good (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46985377)

good

Re:good (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46985545)

This punk needs to be tried as an adult an given a minimum of 5 years in prison.

Re: good (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46986503)

No, 16, can make own decisions according to law? No. Not adult. Best keep it that way.

Re:good (0)

Rinikusu (28164) | about 7 months ago | (#46985653)

doublegoodplusplus.

Re:good (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46986251)

Investigative reporter. Lol. Another hack writing for some cop lobby propaganda sheet. He even states that the police would call him for verification to see if the next move was necessary.

Autoimmune disorder... (5, Insightful)

Entropius (188861) | about 7 months ago | (#46985405)

... the fact that you can do this with a telephone is pretty scary.

Just recently I saw a massive police overreaction (closing off a block of downtown DC in front of a university hospital, complete with police abusing citizens) just because some student left her backpack lying around. If this is all it takes to provoke this sort of reaction, and if a few phone calls can get someone "swatted", then why the hell does al-Qaeda bother with bombings and flying planes into things? Send over a few sleeper cells with nondescript bags and boxes and watch the panic fly.

This is pretty damn analogous to an allergic reaction: "ack, a piece of peanut antigen! FETCH ALL THE CYTOKINES, BOYS, THIS MEANS WAR!"

Re:Autoimmune disorder... (2, Interesting)

Irate Engineer (2814313) | about 7 months ago | (#46985423)

Yep. Back when Osama bin Hidin was running around, all it took was a video to make the U.S. clench its buttcheeks.

Now it just takes a 16 year old prankster.

Re:Autoimmune disorder... (1)

The New Guy 2.0 (3497907) | about 7 months ago | (#46985443)

Where's the 911 location technology so they can authenticate where a call is coming from?

Re:Autoimmune disorder... (2)

niado (1650369) | about 7 months ago | (#46985487)

Where's the 911 location technology so they can authenticate where a call is coming from?

Generally people don't call in swattings from their home phones. There are numerous methods of spoofing or obfuscating the source of a phone call.

Re:Autoimmune disorder... (1)

The New Guy 2.0 (3497907) | about 7 months ago | (#46985505)

Don't cell phones have GPS and Tower Tracking to get this information out?

Re:Autoimmune disorder... (3, Insightful)

rikkards (98006) | about 7 months ago | (#46985565)

Sure but there also these things called pay phones. Not quite as common as they used to be but they are still around

Re:Autoimmune disorder... (3, Informative)

Rob the Bold (788862) | about 7 months ago | (#46986033)

Don't cell phones have GPS and Tower Tracking to get this information out?

Those things are nowhere near as accurate all the time as you might hope they were.

Good article [ieee.org] in IEEE Spectrum on emergency calls (911, 999, etc.) and the impact of newer communication technology like VOIP and mobile.

Re:Autoimmune disorder... (0)

mark-t (151149) | about 7 months ago | (#46985603)

Like what? You said "numerous". Name three.

Re:Autoimmune disorder... (5, Informative)

pipedwho (1174327) | about 7 months ago | (#46985669)

1. Pay phono
2. Voip over someone else's wifi
3. Someone else's phone while they're too drunk to notice an outgoing call
4. Hacked remote computer, then install and use Voip service
5. Stolen cell phone
6. Break into someone's house and use their land line phone
7. Burn phone
8. etc.

Re:Autoimmune disorder... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46985763)

good ol' fashion beige boxing

Re:Autoimmune disorder... (0)

mark-t (151149) | about 7 months ago | (#46985795)

Most of those may obfuscate the caller, but not the source of the call. Calls from a pay phone for instance, will trace to that pay phone, which may or may not be helpful in finding who used the phone to commit the hoax but that phone is still the source of the call. The person to whom I had responded alleged there are "numerous" ways to obfuscate the source of a call.

Re:Autoimmune disorder... (1)

niado (1650369) | about 7 months ago | (#46986043)

Most of those may obfuscate the caller, but not the source of the call. Calls from a pay phone for instance, will trace to that pay phone, which may or may not be helpful in finding who used the phone to commit the hoax but that phone is still the source of the call. The person to whom I had responded alleged there are "numerous" ways to obfuscate the source of a call.

Well, Wikipedia [wikipedia.org] lists exactly three methods of spoofing caller ID specifically.

One interesting technique is to use (abuse) TRS. [wikipedia.org]

If you are interested in actually learning more about such techniques I would suggest typing "call spoofing" into your favorite search engine.

There are other technical and non-technical methods that, as you pedantically noted, do not actually hide the source of the call, but render that information unhelpful. Pre-paid "burner" cell phones are an obvious and popular choice for many circumstances where anonymous calling is desired, and in many cases payphones can also be used with relative anonymity.

Re:Autoimmune disorder... (-1)

mark-t (151149) | about 7 months ago | (#46986141)

I'm less interested in actually learning about them than I am in understanding where people think that it's necessarily something that there are a plethora of ways that anyone could reasonably be able to accomplish.

Re:Autoimmune disorder... (4, Interesting)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | about 7 months ago | (#46986447)

If you are interested in actually learning more about such techniques I would suggest typing "call spoofing" into your favorite search engine.

Thanks for the reminder. Congresswoman Annie Kuster has been robocalling us with the CallerID spoofed to 'WIRELESS CALLER' in the past few days - been meaning to look that up.

Not that I should dare to question my betters, of course.

Re:Autoimmune disorder... (2)

tragedy (27079) | about 7 months ago | (#46986415)

6. Break into someone's house and use their land line phone.

Why even bother breaking in. Traditional POTS service generally has an easy to break into box on the outside of the house. Let's also not forget that pretty much everyone with home telephone service now uses convenient wireless DECT 6.0 handsets that are also convenentily completely insecure (they have encryption, but it's already been completely broken).

Re:Autoimmune disorder... (1)

milkmage (795746) | about 7 months ago | (#46986417)

that's not spoofing, that's hijacking.

spoof means use your own, but make people think it's someone else.

Re:Autoimmune disorder... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46985711)

Like what? You said "numerous". Name three.

I would also like to know. Until the poster responds, if ever, here are my 3 meatspace hacks that, granted, have issues:

A payphone, another's work or home landline, or another's cell phone. Someone elses cell phone will still work for 9-1-1 after the owner has deactivated service.

Re:Autoimmune disorder... (1)

niado (1650369) | about 7 months ago | (#46986075)

Someone elses cell phone will still work for 9-1-1 after the owner has deactivated service.

This is a good one. Stolen phones are quite useful for this kind of activity.

Re:Autoimmune disorder... (3, Interesting)

arth1 (260657) | about 7 months ago | (#46986323)

A payphone, another's work or home landline, or another's cell phone. Someone elses cell phone will still work for 9-1-1 after the owner has deactivated service.

A friend of mine in Europe has 911 as the first three digits of the phone number.
Some phones will accept dialing the number without a SIM card inserted, because it starts with 911.

Re:Autoimmune disorder... (3, Informative)

dnavid (2842431) | about 7 months ago | (#46985721)

Like what? You said "numerous". Name three.

I can name more than three. Skype or other IP telephony (gatewayed through public wifi for extra measure), Hacked PBX call redirectors (which are a favorite of many scammers), prepaid cell phone, disposable SIM cards, telephone call anonymizing services [spoofcard.com] , public pay phone.

Not like the old days (1)

SuperKendall (25149) | about 7 months ago | (#46985991)

Generally people don't call in swattings from their home phones.

You can thank the end of modem use for that, before it was not unknown... I had the police come out to a hotel once because my modem dialed 911, my wife and I and to talk to them for quite a while before they were convinced all was OK.

Re:Autoimmune disorder... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46985451)

They are even going after Politicians...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berwyn_Heights,_Maryland_mayor%27s_residence_drug_raid

Re:Autoimmune disorder... (5, Insightful)

rahvin112 (446269) | about 7 months ago | (#46985683)

You do realize that these Swatting are caused by someone with the fake caller ID of the address calling emergency services and claiming there home has been invaded by someone with guns and they are actively killing people and have numerous hostages. Or some other variant where someone with a gun is in the process of killing someone with a bunch lined up and the caller is either a hidden victim or the person doing the active killing. There is usually included a statement that the cops need to hurry and that any attempt at contact will result in the "killer" immediately killing multiple people.

The scenario presented doesn't give police many options. Though I don't like SWAT teams nor the militarization of the police, but reacting to these scenarios as if it was a prank is only going to result in a real scenario going bad in a way that results in multiple people being killed and everyone laying blame on the cops for not taking it seriously.

Maybe you should read the transcript of these SWAT'ings and lay out what procedure you would have put in place to determine that it was a prank and not the real thing and prove how smart you are. Keep in mind that in some jurisdictions there may be laws on the books that require this type of response.

Re:Autoimmune disorder... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46985743)

While the police reaction is preditable, the GP's point is that caller ID spoofing shouldn't even be possible. Why are the telcos accepting fake caller IDs, and why are the law enforcement agencies tolerating this crap from the phone companies? That's the problem. The police are, as you say, just reacting to the call they get. The question is why the caller is allowed to lie about what number they're calling from.

Re:Autoimmune disorder... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46985835)

yeah, horrible phone companies, allowing a company to put their corporate number for the caller ID for all calls. Horrible that they trust other local exchanges to pass phone numbers. Rotten, how that works. Terrible that forwarding services will pass the number that's calling when they forward between your different phones. Awful, I tell you, awful.

Re:Autoimmune disorder... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46985971)

In BGP, the *reputable* upstream companies require you to tell them which subnets you will might announce to them. The specifics of your announcements remain up to how you want to run your network, but Joe's ISP shack shouldn't be able to randomly announce EBay's IP space. Why can't the phone companies do the same for caller ID?

Re:Autoimmune disorder... (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46986041)

It's absolutely unacceptable for a telco to report a false number to emergency services, ever. I don't care if a company wants their corporate number on the caller ID for all their calls -- if someone calls 911 from a corporate phone, it needs to have the correct number, name, and address. Same for call forwarding -- when I'm calling 911 and need the EMTs or police here NOW, they better see the number I'm actually calling from, not the one which I normally prefer to display to the world.

If a local exchange proves to be untrustworthy (repeatedly passing spoofed numbers) then they should be cut off from caller ID services and every number passed from that local exchange should be displayed on caller ID as "CALLER ID NOT VERIFIED" until they fix their issues.

Re:Autoimmune disorder... (4, Interesting)

mysidia (191772) | about 7 months ago | (#46986045)

yeah, horrible phone companies, allowing a company to put their corporate number for the caller ID for all calls.

Fine if they put whatever they want in the 'caller id' that is transmitted inband at the start of the call; they should NOT be allowed to use a custom ANI; the ANI number which is used for long distance billing should be unique to the line and should be the number that calls into that line.

The police ought to be provided access to and use the more reliable ANI Billing number (Automatic Number Identification), instead of the relying upon the possibly user-spoofable Caller ID.

Re:Autoimmune disorder... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46985939)

Bullshit.

All bullshit.

This is yet another symptom of the militarization of the police force in the United States.

For the last generation, "Serve and Protect" has become "Cover your ass" and "Everyone is a perp."

The annual mortality rate for police officers is substantially lower than the age-adjusted mortality rate for the population as a whole, and 'police' are trained to regard everyone as a threat regardless and deploy increasing levels of racial and socioeconomic profiling to ensure that the wealthy and well-connected have nothing to fear from their tame police force.

Re:Autoimmune disorder... (3, Insightful)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | about 7 months ago | (#46986257)

For the last generation, "Serve and Protect" has become "Cover your ass" and "Everyone is a perp."

But that's exactly the problem - everybody *is* a perp. We have so many laws and every goddamn things has been criminalized, either by statute or regulation, that we'll all felons [amazon.com] now - it's just a matter of who is having the laws enforced against them.

Disabled man shot up for having a seizure? That's OK, he was a perp anyway.

Re:Autoimmune disorder... (2)

ColdSam (884768) | about 7 months ago | (#46986181)

So the solution is for the police to react calmly, professionally using their presumably expert knowledge with a little bit of common sense. They should be able to suss out these swattings and act appropriately in the vast majority of cases. Breaking down doors and shooting innocents should be an incredible rarity.

Re:Autoimmune disorder... (1)

Nahor (41537) | about 7 months ago | (#46985739)

And then when someone calls 911 because of a real hostage situation or bomb threat, then people go all up in arms because SWAT was too slow, never mind that they were only checking if the call was legit.

What's scary is how people always overreact, no matter what, and require blood if the outcome doesn't please them, even if everything was done right otherwise.

Re:Autoimmune disorder... (1)

cheater512 (783349) | about 7 months ago | (#46985981)

Yep it is a no-win situation.

However I have limited sympathy.
It is like leaving your house unlocked and complain that you always get broken in to.
If they don't even bother attempting to stop swattings, then too bad that is their problem.

Re:Autoimmune disorder... (4, Insightful)

rtb61 (674572) | about 7 months ago | (#46986073)

There is a win, risk analysis based upon reality. Initial police response to confirm is only minutes away, delaying everything whilst waiting for swat is tens of minutes. Unless of course the police force has been right wing screwed up and turned into for profit law enforcement, where police are far away chasing traffic fines and some trigger happy freak is all to eager to send and the swat team and kill some people, anyone.

There is huge risk in sending out the swat team, this has been proven time and time again, by far the safer and quicker response is by a properly managed police force and confirmation being sought by 'actively' patrolling police officers. No public call should ever, I repeat ever, activate the swat team, only a request by a senior officer on site should bring the dogs out.

Re: Autoimmune disorder... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46986131)

Left wing screwed up as an anti worker ...
There, FTFY.

Re:Autoimmune disorder... (1)

ColdSam (884768) | about 7 months ago | (#46986211)

And then when someone calls 911 because of a real hostage situation or bomb threat, then people go all up in arms because SWAT was too slow, never mind that they were only checking if the call was legit.

And those people should be ignored, the police should not overreact (e.g. to the backpack in the example provided) just for public perception.

Re:Autoimmune disorder... (5, Insightful)

melchoir55 (218842) | about 7 months ago | (#46985787)

The reason terrorists don't bother with stuff like this:

There aren't any.

Re:Autoimmune disorder... (1, Offtopic)

fightermagethief (3645291) | about 7 months ago | (#46985873)

Mind = Blown

Re:Autoimmune disorder... (5, Insightful)

Rick Zeman (15628) | about 7 months ago | (#46985925)

... the fact that you can do this with a telephone is pretty scary.

Just recently I saw a massive police overreaction (closing off a block of downtown DC in front of a university hospital, complete with police abusing citizens) just because some student left her backpack lying around. If this is all it takes to provoke this sort of reaction, and if a few phone calls can get someone "swatted", then why the hell does al-Qaeda bother with bombings and flying planes into things? Send over a few sleeper cells with nondescript bags and boxes and watch the panic fly.

If the purpose of terrorism is to terrorize, the terrorists have won.

Re:Autoimmune disorder... (1)

Princeofcups (150855) | about 7 months ago | (#46986037)

If this is all it takes to provoke this sort of reaction, and if a few phone calls can get someone "swatted", then why the hell does al-Qaeda bother with bombings and flying planes into things? Send over a few sleeper cells with nondescript bags and boxes and watch the panic fly.

Because they don't operate like that. Their goal is not to inconvenience Americans, it's to get international attention and power over their own people. The US is just a convenient punching bag. Or do you really think that they are "jealous of our freedoms."

Re:Autoimmune disorder... (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about 7 months ago | (#46986127)

The news here is that if an anonymous prank call is all it takes to launch SWATs, the sleeper cells should just learn to speak flawless English and have 911 on speeddial.

How long do you think it would take for a team of dedicated terrorists to shutdown emergency services if they are this stupid?

Re:Autoimmune disorder... (1)

murdocj (543661) | about 7 months ago | (#46986343)

Maybe you missed the Boston Marathon bombings? The police have a choice. They can ignore warnings, suspicious packages, etc, and we can just accept that major cities are going to lose a few thousand people each year. Or they can react to EACH threat. They don't have 20-20 hindsight.

Worst of both worlds. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46986431)

They will react to each threat and there will still be Boston marathon bombings probably with increasing frequency due to the psychological stress the society is under caused by an over reacting immune system. Worst of both worlds.

Re:Autoimmune disorder... (1)

j-beda (85386) | about 7 months ago | (#46986517)

Maybe you missed the Boston Marathon bombings? The police have a choice. They can ignore warnings, suspicious packages, etc, and we can just accept that major cities are going to lose a few thousand people each year. Or they can react to EACH threat. They don't have 20-20 hindsight.

THOUSANDS of people EACH YEAR in "major cities"? What colour is the sky in your world?

Maybe I have been sleeping - did I miss the announcements of multiple foiled death plots in North America? I guess the police doing all this type of "targeting suspicious activities" could be acting as a deterrent, but I find it hard to believe that in each of our "major cities" there are people crazy enough to want to plot bombings, but at the same time being held back by their fear of the actions of the police.

Re:Autoimmune disorder... (1)

VortexCortex (1117377) | about 7 months ago | (#46986451)

... the fact that you can do this with a telephone is pretty scary.

Militarization of the police fits your "government's" anti-activism agenda [theguardian.com] that has been carried out for over a century. [wikipedia.org]

SWATting won't end on its own, they want the practice to become more acceptable. This is just practice for ensuring no one ever tries to defeat "national security" which means maintaining the social, economic and political status quo even against the will of the people. What's scariest is how easy "citizens" allow themselves to be fooled into paying for oppressive police states they actually do not want. It's like they've not learned a thing from their Declaration of Independence or founding fathers teachings about the folly of trading rights for security.

It seems history has at least one more cycle left to repeat. This isn't analogous to an allergic reaction reaction at all. This is consciously planned out social engineering, and if you think otherwise, you're just ignorant of the facts about your country that have been common knowledge for decades. The 70's did happen, you know. Pentagon Papers ring a bell? Read any FOIA docs recently?

What do you do if a child keeps acting up? You take away it's damn toys. Point the finger all you want, but this is your kid that's running amok, again.

Good, but... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46985419)

It's good that he's been caught, but it's ridiculous how the police will overreact to everything and use a ridiculous amount of force when it's simply not necessary. That does not bode well for us.

Re:Good, but... (4, Insightful)

YrWrstNtmr (564987) | about 7 months ago | (#46985513)

There is no 'but'.

The next time someone calls with the exact same wording, and they don't respond appropriately.....you'll be calling for their heads to roll.
Yes, I get that the police have too any toys they need to use. But wtf are they supposed to do? Send Officer Snuffy with a single bullet in his pocket every time?

Re:Good, but... (2)

Nutria (679911) | about 7 months ago | (#46985599)

Send out the SWAT team, but do a smidgen of reconnaissance before clearing the area and bashing down the doors.

Re:Good, but... (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46985611)

The next time someone calls with the exact same wording, and they don't respond appropriately.....you'll be calling for their heads to roll.

It seems you've mixed me up with imbeciles who want perfect safety and find it acceptable for authority figures to ruin innocent people's lives. That is a mistake, because I'm not like that.

Take note that you're talking to a specific individual. After the 9/11 attacks, I was opposed to the government taking away our freedoms and giving us 'safety'.

It's very troubling when the police overreact to things and respond with an overwhelming amount of force, and idiots who think the police should be 100% perfect shouldn't even be taken into consideration.

Re:Good, but... (1)

sjames (1099) | about 7 months ago | (#46986235)

It's not like they can't respond at all, they just need to avoid shooting the dog and blowing the house up until they see some evidence that something is actually going on. Stuff they really should be doing anyway.

Re:Good, but... (1)

alen (225700) | about 7 months ago | (#46985741)

the one time you don't react, someone will die and there will be a huge investigation and people being fired with no pension benefits

Re:Good, but... (4, Insightful)

j-beda (85386) | about 7 months ago | (#46986545)

the one time you don't react, someone will die and there will be a huge investigation and people being fired with no pension benefits

No one is saying "don't react", they are saying "react appropriately". You put together a well thought out response plan BEFORE the event, then follow it. Such a response plan should not call for busting down the doors with guns blazing on the strength of a single anonymous phone call. Not following the plan is what should result in disciplinary actions.

First Swatting Victims Were Conservative Bloggers (-1, Troll)

Nova Express (100383) | about 7 months ago | (#46985541)

Among the first instances of swatting I was aware of were conservative bloggers like Aaron Walker [breitbart.com] , Erick Erickson [theothermccain.com] and Patrick Frey [laweekly.com] , all of whom were working to expose convicted felon and "Speedway Bomber" Brett Kimberlin [battleswarmblog.com] .

There may have been earlier instances, but those are the first I'm aware of.

Re:First Swatting Victims Were Conservative Blogge (3, Informative)

rahvin112 (446269) | about 7 months ago | (#46985601)

The reason you are only aware of those instances (and of course implying those are the first instances) is because you are a partisan hack.

FYI swatting has been used significantly longer that your partisan views ascribe. I a guy that someone tried to swat (the community didn't have a swat) in 1994 via modem redial on a BBS. Why don't you try climbing out of your partisan cave? There is nothing more disgusting than anyone trying to claim (or imply in this case) that persecution makes them right or virtuous in their cause.

Re:First Swatting Victims Were Conservative Blogge (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46985759)

It certainly dates back to the 1960's, when faking bomb threats from peaceful protesters was used to bring in police and National Guard against them. The Scientologists made an art form of it. Mary Sue Hubbard, L. Ron's wife was convicted for her involvement in "dead agenting" Paulette Cooper, which included faked bomb threats against the Israeli embassy, in order to discredit Paulette's book called "The Scandal of Scientology". And who can forget "The Maine", whose faked fraudulently advertised bomb destruction in 1898 was a vital trigger of the Spanish-American War?

Discrediting your opponents by making fraudulent bomb threats is an old, old political hobby.

Re:First Swatting Victims Were Conservative Blogge (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46985863)

Don't forget World War 2, when the Nazis made up claims about anarchists with explosives in order to justify their abuses.

Re:First Swatting Victims Were Conservative Blogge (1)

rahvin112 (446269) | about 7 months ago | (#46986039)

WWII?, the same thing happened during the french revolution when the Monarchy blamed anarchist for any number of actions their own soldiers commited. This isn't a game of trying to find the first incident, it's probably been happening since og claimed ug shat on the food so he could steal his new cool invention the wheel.

Re:First Swatting Victims Were Conservative Blogge (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46986119)

Oh you thought we were talking the first? When the above person already mentioned the 1898 Spanish-American War?

Re:First Swatting Victims Were Conservative Blogge (2)

Opportunist (166417) | about 7 months ago | (#46986157)

The first victim of war has always been truth. Hell, the crap in the Ukraine isn't even a war yet and truth is already dead and buried.

Re:First Swatting Victims Were Conservative Blogge (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46985649)

I think you've conclusively proven that this Canadian kid advertising his services to random people on Twitter is an American liberal. Great detective work. Now if only the world was limited to just what you personally know.

Re:First Swatting Victims Were Conservative Blogge (-1, Flamebait)

HornWumpus (783565) | about 7 months ago | (#46985777)

16 years old and not too bright. Certainly a liberal.

Re:First Swatting Victims Were Conservative Blogge (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46986047)

All 16 year olds are liberal and brighter than you ever were.

Re:First Swatting Victims Were Conservative Blogge (1)

DutchUncle (826473) | about 7 months ago | (#46985775)

That's only because you didn't live in New York City, where false fire alarms and sending police to someone else's house for a "domestic" call were considered entertainment in certain quarters back in the day. Admittedly, they were less likely to show up with military weapons then.

I don't get it (2, Insightful)

arielCo (995647) | about 7 months ago | (#46985559)

At the risk of being modded into the ground, how is this Slashdot material?

Re:I don't get it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46985625)

Here's one for the nerds: I was amused at the size of the ottowapolice.ca sign on their building.

Re:I don't get it (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46985627)

Because this is what Slashdot has become.

Re:I don't get it (1)

The New Guy 2.0 (3497907) | about 7 months ago | (#46985717)

It's a tech failure for 911 to not know where a call is coming from.

Re:I don't get it (2)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46986519)

OK, I have worked for 3 letter agencies and emergency responders (after studying EE and then CS in university: serves me right...). Tracking 'Land Lines' is dead simple. If you have a physical telephone, the phone company knows (and not just kinda) your location and phone number, and there is a hard line between the phone company and the emergency responders (and if the line between the phone company and where I was went down an alarm went off and then a guy from the phone company would call me in less than a minute). This line does not know about unlisted numbers. The technical term is ANI/ALI (automatic number information/automatic location information). When the 911 operator picks up the phone, the data spill appears on their console (there is a bit of technology that distributes an even number of calls to operators during a shift, and they can put themselves out of the queue temporarily, but whoever picks up the call has the spill go to the forms on their particular computer). The other half of the deal is wireless phones. Its easy to identify the cell tower you are connected to, and just a roaming signal is enough for two towers to determine based on signal strength your approximate location. Its not exact (although it is getting better), and does not require GPS coordinates from the phone (Ambulances, Fire Trucks and Police cars have Trunking radio systems equipped with GPS coordinates that are sent either once every minute, once every 5 seconds if the unit is moving, or whenever the microphone is keyed). The technical term is location based service.

Re:I don't get it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46985781)

At the risk of being modded into the ground, how is this Slashdot material?

The "authorities" consider a lot of people in this neck of the woods the bad guys. It's important to be aware of what the good guys do when they decide you're one of the bad guys.

Re:I don't get it (1)

DutchUncle (826473) | about 7 months ago | (#46985785)

Oh, the technique was totally new, because it involved "with a computer".

Sucks to be his parents (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46985675)

Sucks to be his parents.

Nothing like getting sued by someone whose been swatted.

But that's what they're going to get for raising a little asshole.

Re:Sucks to be his parents (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46985793)

not really how it works in canada, the kid will probably have criminal charges but people wont be able to ruin his parents lives because they all live in fear all the time now and have whiplash

Re:Sucks to be his parents (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | about 7 months ago | (#46985837)

At least they can get judgements against the little bastard and take any money he might earn in the future.

Re:Sucks to be his parents (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46985825)

But that's what they're going to get for raising a little asshole.

As much as I love blaming parents for their llittle turdsquirts...

You're assuming all behavior is learned. It isn't. I'm fine with holding parents responsible for the wanton acts of their hellspawn, but only if a system is enacted to allow parents to emancipate themselves from their offspring.

Some kids are just fucking monsters, and no amount of touchy feely hugging is going to stop them from being sociopathic nightmares.

Re:Sucks to be his parents (2)

mark-t (151149) | about 7 months ago | (#46985945)

All behavior is learned... just not necessarily from a person's parents.

If you don't think behavior is learned, guess what happens to babies who aren't given any stimulation whatsoever beyond being fed and kept only as clean as necessity may dictate?

And for what it's worth, some psycho actually did such an experiment in Europe a few centuries ago.... and if I'm remembering correctly,, he wanted to discover what language babies would learn to speak if they weren't exposed to social interaction. The answer is, of course... they don't learn any language. They die.

Everything that we do is learned... copied from somewhere, possibly mutated by our own imagination or combined with other things we have learned to perhaps produce entire original behavior, but in the end, it sill is all learned.

Re:Sucks to be his parents (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | about 7 months ago | (#46986009)

They were expected to spontaneously start speaking Hebrew.

Seriously. Hard to understand the thinking.

Re:Sucks to be his parents (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46986567)

Hebrew is allegedly the language of the heavens, combined with the "babies are innocent/without sin" meme (well, I suppose they baptized the babies before "abandoning" them), its not difficult to see how they could've gotten the idea. Its completely absurd of course, but religion was a big thing back then, and unfortunately still is.

bleh. (5, Insightful)

rogoshen1 (2922505) | about 7 months ago | (#46985789)

On one hand, glad the little fucker got caught. on the other, also glad he was Canadian. Had he been in the US, he'd probably get a life sentence.

16 year old kids do really incredibly dumb anti social stuff, problems arise with something as easy to pull off as this -- and the supposed anonymity of the internet. How many of you remember winnuke (circa 1996)? Nowadays nuking someone would have been met with a knock on the door, and being hauled away in cuffs.

(NOT defending swatting. more criticizing penalties for teenagers in the US. At 16 you're a moron -- you have some inkling of the consequences but you don't really *get* it.)

Re:bleh. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46985993)

At 16 you are still your parents responsibility. Perhaps we should just send the parents a bill for all the costs associated with the swatting.

Re:bleh. (5, Insightful)

rahvin112 (446269) | about 7 months ago | (#46985997)

I've never met a 16 year old that didn't understand what they were doing. On the other hand I've met plenty that didn't care. Not even 100 years ago 16 years old was an adult in many places able to exercise contracts, get married and work full time. My grandparents married at 17/16. I don't ascribe to the view that 16 years old is incapable of understanding their actions, that ability develops as early as 5 years old. I do ascribe to the view that our society and most western societies don't hold those 16 year old's to that level and that results in kids like this doing these horrible things.

I also don't think he should face quite the same penalties as an older individual but it's foolish to suggest they don't understand the consequences. Most 16 year olds fully understand, in fact they understand so well that they fully grasp that society will not punish them as harshly because of their age and willfully engage in actions like this because they know there is no long term consequence for their action.

That said he should spend the next two years of his life in a juvenile correctional institution receiving the counseling, assistance and parenting he clearly needs. Afterwards his record should be sealed and he should be told that should he commit these actions again he will end up in real prison.

Re:bleh. (4, Insightful)

SuperKendall (25149) | about 7 months ago | (#46986015)

I don't know, I think for something like swatting more than ten or so people deserve the full adult felony treatment - because in that case they are an irredeemable asshole and I'd rather them be vanished than spend time figuring out if they are useful to society or not.

I did some dumb things too as a kid, but not 30 times over...

Re:bleh. (1)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | about 7 months ago | (#46986219)

I did some dumb things too as a kid, but not 30 times over...

That's OK, you just have to do them three times now, and then be unlucky - we sentence on "three strikes" rules now, because, you know, baseball and also "tough on crime!".

30 attempted murders (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46986055)

Sure. He can't possibly understand what his 'fun' is causing. He should be tortured at gitmo for a few years to see if he knows anything about those anonymous terrists then a bullet in the back of the head when he doesn't know it is coming.

Re:bleh. (4, Insightful)

Princeofcups (150855) | about 7 months ago | (#46986063)

At 16 you're a moron -- you have some inkling of the consequences but you don't really *get* it.)

Only in the US, where we try to extend "innocence" as long as possible. In a lot of cultures 16 year old are working and starting families. I'm not saying that's the preferred path, just that a 16 year old SHOULD be able to make adult decisions. The fact that they can't means that society is not raising them correctly.

Re:bleh. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46986403)

Only in the US, where we try to extend "innocence" as long as possible.

Actually, it is everywhere. You are not *really* an adult until at least 25-ish. Why do you think the most age prone group for car crashes is the 16-21 demographic? Why they can't even rent a car? Why is the the young the demographic for the army, not the 30-year olds?

Just because you are old enough to fuck (sorry, "starting a family") does not mean you are old enough to be wise and make intelligent decisions.

Swatting sounds so funny (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46985803)

But holy shit its a waste of resources and should never ever be done. but having your door kicked in by guys with guns wearing masks would scare the shit out of you and it is hilarious.

Re:Swatting sounds so funny (1, Informative)

WilyCoder (736280) | about 7 months ago | (#46985851)

Putting someone's life needlessly in danger is funny to you? Fuck off.

Re:Swatting sounds so funny (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46986005)

Putting someone's life needlessly in danger is funny to you? Fuck off.

Depends on the person, right? You know you agree -- you're thinking right now that I deserve it, aren't you?

Re:Swatting sounds so funny (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | about 7 months ago | (#46986023)

Mel Brooks: You, having a heart attack, is comedy; me, stubbing my toe, is tragedy.

Just up the street from me (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46985849)

I guess that explains the SWAT team that busted down the door of a house just a 100m up the street from me on the weekend --> West End of Ottawa, quiet, no crime neighbourhood. And no need for the battering ram they used, other than a little poetic justice perhaps.

Excellent work! (1)

man_ls (248470) | about 7 months ago | (#46986179)

This kid should rot in jail for a while, then receive a lifetime ban from emergency services.

I'm okay with this (1)

sandbagger (654585) | about 7 months ago | (#46986195)

Seriously, WTF, kiddo?

Lesson learned (2)

penguinoid (724646) | about 7 months ago | (#46986309)

You should stop at 29 swattings and fake bomb threats.

Seriously, how did he not get caught earlier?

Pointing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46986495)

Haw Haw

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?