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German Intelligence Agency Planning To Follow Big NSA Brother On Shoestring

timothy posted about 7 months ago | from the ironie-und-sarcasmus dept.

Privacy 80

An anonymous reader, tongue in cheek, writes"Facebook, Twitter, et al are tools for terrorists planning to do whatever terrorists do, Germany's BND has discovered. Inevitably, real-time monitoring of these sites is necessary and urgently required [original, in German], not least because that Snowden chap has shown we're running behind the U.S. and UK. And Spain. And Italy. In short, it's a national emergency — 300 million euros, presto please — and if we do this smartly, we could even get a sense of what the population outside Germany thinks. And while we're at it, why not throw in automated enemy face recognition too — and biometry and-and a program to deform the faces of our own spies' selfies, so the enemy cannot google them. Time to invest in national security startups."

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Good for them! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47134845)

Since the Germans are so eager to bring back the one true East Germany, maybe they can bring back Hitler too. And when they try to conquer the world again, make sure they fucking win this time.

Re:Good for them! (1)

Archtech (159117) | about 7 months ago | (#47134983)

Is this the earliest recorded invocation of Godwin?

Re:Good for them! (1)

gigaherz (2653757) | about 7 months ago | (#47135013)

Now we just need someone to mention Hitler within the summary, I guess? Mentioning Hitler in the article may actually be too soon for Godwin's Law to apply to it? Where do we draw the line and make it just part of the article?

Re:Good for them! (1)

davester666 (731373) | about 7 months ago | (#47137221)

why not just have him both submit the article and be the editor...he could finally stop using 'timothy' as a nom de plume.

Automated enemy face recognition? (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about 7 months ago | (#47134849)

And while we're at it, why not throw in automated enemy face recognition too

Is that a synonym for kufiya recognition these days? Because, you know, these things are roughly equal when it comes to accuracy these days. /s

Staatssicherheit (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47134853)

German intelligence wants to know what people are thinking? It sounds like they are doing this for the security of the state, "Staatssicherheit".

Again.

Re:Staatssicherheit (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47134861)

Well, Homeland Security... just that name is chilling.

Re:Staatssicherheit (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47134887)

Well, Homeland Security... just that name is chilling.

You'd have thought that in 2001-2002 someone would have pointed that out to them. The optics of it are so goddamn Commie you couldn't have used that name in a 1980s/Cold War dystopian sci-fi movie without it being obvious that anyone who uses language like that is a Really Bad Guy.

And yet they did. Right in front of us. While those of us who got the "joke" were called them on it. And it worked anyways.

Re:Staatssicherheit (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47134901)

It worked anyways because the voters are Really Stupid Idiots (irony intended).

Re:Staatssicherheit (1)

rasmusbr (2186518) | about 7 months ago | (#47134979)

Well, Homeland Security... just that name is chilling.

Staatssicherheit meant "security of the state" where "state" refered to the government, so it really meant "security of the government". The main purpose was probably to make sure the East Germany stayed loyal to the Kremlin.

Re:Staatssicherheit (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47141787)

Nope, that translates as "State" or "National" security...none of the homeliness of "Heimatssicherheit"

Who knew the end of capitalism... (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47134859)

... would result in technocratic tyranny where robots and automated identification run rampant as the clueless masses entertain themselves to death in a stupor after the hours of stress at work.

Re:Who knew the end of capitalism... (4, Informative)

MRe_nl (306212) | about 7 months ago | (#47134955)

Terry Gilliam, George Orwell, Aldous Huxley, Karl Marx, Philip K. Dick, Isaac Asimov, Larry Niven?

Re:Who knew the end of capitalism... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47135005)

One of those guys is still alive and I rather suspect that if you took this thesis to him he'd laugh you out of town.

Re:Who knew the end of capitalism... (1)

MRe_nl (306212) | about 7 months ago | (#47135023)

If I could make any of the above-mentioned laugh at any joke of mine I would be a happy necromancer.

Re:Who knew the end of capitalism... (1)

lennier1 (264730) | about 7 months ago | (#47137637)

Considering that Terry Gilliam is still very much alive it might just be because your jokes suck.

Re:Who knew the end of capitalism... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47139657)

One of those guys is still alive

Eventually the conspiracy will get to him as well.

I, for one, welcome our automatically identifying killing robot overlords!

Re: Who knew the end of capitalism... (1)

osiaq (2495684) | about 7 months ago | (#47135171)

You forgot Lem, especially "Return from the stars"

Re: Who knew the end of capitalism... (1)

umghhh (965931) | about 7 months ago | (#47135723)

revolt of the washing machines and peace on earth are bit more appropriate I think but in general the master had predicted quite some of the things that become reality.

Re:Who knew the end of capitalism... (0)

stenvar (2789879) | about 7 months ago | (#47135221)

Germany has been hostile to capitalism for as long as capitalism has existed. Since Germany never had capitalism, it can't actually end there.

Widespread, heavy government control of citizens has been part of German culture for centuries. For Germany, this is nothing new.

Re:Who knew the end of capitalism... (1)

umghhh (965931) | about 7 months ago | (#47135705)

what work? The way this is going these days is that due to interdependent changes in economy, technology, organization etc the masses will be less and less employable. Other than that the diagnosis with tyranny is correct, I think.

I recall reading "The Net Delusion: How Not to Liberate The World" in 2011 and thinking how this can evolve and what about things Morozov did not write, because he maybe did not know (or did not dare to write, being afraid of tin foil hat label etc). I have also an impression that in the world so small as ours (thanx to technology) some means of using the streams of data is needed anyway. Not only for terrorists but also for normal criminals. They use technology too and combating them in old fashion way is increasingly impossible. Checks and balances - that is the way to go. But then there are some tiny little problems, namely with democracy itself. We know now how silly it is to believe that our voices count - they do not. We may vote one asshole out of the office (not an easy feat but still possible) but what to do between elections? What about policies that we disagree with and which are anyway introduced?

Quite frankly, when I think about decisions our Great Leaders make (for the sake of democracy, human rights and their corporate friends), I have this sickening feeling of the past long gone - when for instance questions about discrepancies in party approved history books could mean no access to university (fortunately for me communism fell before this happened).

Re:Who knew the end of capitalism... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47141795)

Go watch the film Brazil, gets less unreal as each day passes

On the uselessness of spies (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47134877)

It's urgent to spend more money on collecting more data than we can analyze. The KGB won the spy war hands down, yet USSR lost the cold war hands down. That's how important spies are to national security.

Re:On the uselessness of spies (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47134889)

Cold war spy fiction was awesomely entertaining and wickedly profitable in a capitalistic sort of way.

Re:On the uselessness of spies (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47135319)

If the KGB won the spy war hands down, why couldn't they see the coming of a global surprise ping which made the Soviet missile forces concentrate below the ice cap?

Re:On the uselessness of spies (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47135403)

Is that a new form of Chewbacca defense? I understand spies livehood depends on the widespread beliefs spies are ultracompetent übermensch and the first and last line of defense against annihilation by foreign threats but this myth is just self serving propaganda so spies can get bigger salaries.

Re:On the uselessness of spies (3, Insightful)

greenbird (859670) | about 7 months ago | (#47135597)

The KGB won the spy war hands down, yet USSR lost the cold war hands down.

Hmmm...I'm guessing you mean the KGB won the foreign espionage battle. Apparently they didn't do so good on the domestic espionage front or they would likely still be here. What it seems you don't understand is none of these programs have anything to do with foreign espionage or counter terrorism for that matter. They're all about domestic espionage, that is spying on and controlling dissent within your own population.

The difference with the USA (4, Insightful)

vikingpower (768921) | about 7 months ago | (#47134897)

...is that Germany is much closer to being a true and functioning democracy. I don't see how this would come through the Bundestag, the German parliament, without being at least watered down, viz. being quietly forced into starvation as soon as a left-leaning government comes into power.

Re:The difference with the USA (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47134907)

Of course the world revolves around the USA.

Re:The difference with the USA (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47134931)

Of course the world revolves around the USA.

For now.

Ignorance feeds the thought that it's always been this way.

Stupidity feeds the thought that it's sustainable.

Re:The difference with the USA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47134969)

Does the USA hold the standard we compare everything to ?

Re:The difference with the USA (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47135017)

Does the USA hold the standard we compare everything to ?

Mostly.

For the moment.

At the rate things are going, not much longer. Except maybe in the destruction of liberty.

Re:The difference with the USA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47135927)

Does the USA hold the standard we compare everything to ?

Nope, they have a crap football team, speaking of football, yes that is what we call it here in Europe. And we don't mean stupid Gridiron (american football) which is just a rugby variant.

Re:The difference with the USA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47144743)

No, it doesn't. It only holds the standard people in the USA compare everything to. I'm not even kidding, whenever I read American journalism *everything* is compared or sized against internal American things, places, celebrities and definitions of political terms. No attempt is even made to acknowledge the existence of anything else on the planet (except in condescension). That brings back a lot of bad memories of the USSR.

Re:The difference with the USA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47137169)

Of course the world revolves around the USA.

For now.

Yes. Our next overlords will be the Chinese. Enjoy it.

The difference with the USA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47134913)

...being quietly forced into starvation as soon as a left-leaning government comes into power.

You're right on. As soon as hell has frozen over, this will be stopped!

Re:The difference with the USA (0)

lennier1 (264730) | about 7 months ago | (#47134925)

Like the last left-leaning government that did more damage to the nation's healthcare, social security, employee protection, financial market regulation and other sectors than the previous conservative government could've ever dreamed during its 16 years of majority?

Re:The difference with the USA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47134951)

...is that Germany is much closer to being a true and functioning democracy. I don't see how this would come through the Bundestag, the German parliament [...]

Easily. Politicians want to keep their jobs, hence they have to vote as the party requires them to vote. Or they are receiving money from corporations, in which case they vote for whatever they prefer. Or both.

The one place where regulations for these topics are typically "stopped" is the federal constitutional court (or now more often the European one). And then it isn't outright stopped, but politicians are typically just told to re-think what they did and come up with something else.

Re:The difference with the USA (2)

Golden_Rider (137548) | about 7 months ago | (#47134965)

...is that Germany is much closer to being a true and functioning democracy. I don't see how this would come through the Bundestag, the German parliament, without being at least watered down, viz. being quietly forced into starvation as soon as a left-leaning government comes into power.

Nope, it will be as usual.

"Diplomacy" is absolutely necessary (all governments know that the others are spying, too, which is important for secret behind-the-scenes deals, so nobody can just STOP spying just because the masses are against it). The spying will go on, while the politicians - in public - will claim to be against it. So when the next Snowden shows up and publishes proof that spying indeed DOES happen, the politicians can claim to not have known about it, some heads will roll, the politicians will promise that something like this will never happen again, while secretly handing over more money to fund BETTER spying.

Re:The difference with the USA (2)

silanea (1241518) | about 7 months ago | (#47134989)

...is that Germany is much closer to being a true and functioning democracy. [...] as soon as a left-leaning government comes into power.

That is, I am afraid, a very naive view. Our social democrats, the SPD, - I assume that is what you meant with left-leaning - have earned themselves the nickname "Verräterpartei" ("traitors' party") amongst those who care about civil rights for the strong discrepancy between their election pledges and their actual voting in parliament. The party's functionaries usually state afterwards that they agreed to rights-infringing laws "mit Bauchschmerzen" ("with bellyache"); that phrase has become a meme over here. A lot of the draconian post-9/11 legislation was rushed through parliament under a social democrat government by then-minister for the interior Otto Schily, which is why the laws are known as the "Otto-Katalog" ("Otto catalogue" obviously, which is a play on German mail-order company Otto).

The actual left-leaning party, the LINKE or Linkspartei, unfortunately is lingering somewhere between 5 and 10% in elections and is politically isolated from all major parties including the SPD. They along with the German Pirate Party are amongst the very few parties over here that actually care about civil rights, but they still do not reach a critical mass of voters. So we Germans have to look to the Federal Constitutional Court in Karlsruhe for protecting us from an ever-growing "security" complex.

Re:The difference with the USA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47135011)

...is that Germany is much closer to being a true and functioning democracy. I don't see how this would come through the Bundestag, the German parliament, without being at least watered down, viz. being quietly forced into starvation as soon as a left-leaning government comes into power.

haha you don't know anything about Germany, do you?

Re:The difference with the USA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47135155)

I actually see no way how this could possibly stand before the Bundesverfassungsgericht (very roughly the Supreme Court that is tasked with upholding the constituation by checking if laws are constitutional). I seriously don't. That is going to get stopped once it starts running.

Sadly after the 300 million euros (times x for "unforseen costs" during the project run) have been spent.

Re:The difference with the USA (1)

ahnungslos (3590053) | about 7 months ago | (#47145385)

I'm afraid we'll be presented with a fait accompli. I'm also in doubt that Karsruhe is able to stop this mess :(

Re:The difference with the USA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47135159)

.is that Germany is much closer to being a true and functioning democracy. I don't see how this would come through the Bundestag

Our Bundeskanzlerin grew up in the GDR, didn't complain about mass surveillance until she got targeted personally and pushes everything she wants as "alternativ los", the likelihood of her or any of her yes men stopping this is about as high as them fixing the broken (and illegal - cite BVG) state of the Bundestagswahlen. Neither would the other big players in Germany do anything against it as long as it could be useful when they are in POWER (TM).

Re:The difference with the USA (1)

stenvar (2789879) | about 7 months ago | (#47135253)

I don't see how this would come through the Bundestag, the German parliament, without being at least watered down, viz. being quietly forced into starvation as soon as a left-leaning government comes into power.

The same way that the government of Brandt that gave the NSA a carte blanche to spy in Germany.

...is that Germany is much closer to being a true and functioning democracy

If by "true and functioning democracy", you mean a mix of right wing populism, left wing demagoguery, technocracy, and corporate cronyism, then Germany is indeed closer to it; but fear not, the US is rapidly heading down that way too, led by such luminaries as Bush and Obama.

Re:The difference with the USA (2)

aliquis (678370) | about 7 months ago | (#47135481)

Democracy Index:
http://sv.wikipedia.org/wiki/D... [wikipedia.org]

#1 Norway, 9.80/10.00
#4 Sweden, 9.50/10.00
#14 Germany, 8.34/10.00
#19 USA, 8.11/10.00

8-10 is condisered functioning democracy.

#119 Russia, 3.92/10.00
#141 China, 3.14/10.00
#167 North Korea, 1.08/10.00

Re:The difference with the USA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47135673)

Well, that of course settles it! The Economist asks a bunch of unnamed "experts" for their opinion, assigns numerical scores, and voila, we have a scientific answer!

Are you really that stupid?

Re:The difference with the USA (1)

aliquis (678370) | about 7 months ago | (#47138599)

Better than nothing.

There's also http://www.freedomhouse.org/re... [freedomhouse.org]

Freedom in the world - 2013
Freedom rating 1-7
Sweden - 1.0, Germany - 1.0, USA - 1.0, Russia - 5.5
Civil liberties 1-7
Sweden - 1, Germany - 1, USA - 1, Russia - 5
Political rights 1-7
Sweden - 1, Germany - 1, USA - 1, Russia - 6

Freedom of the press - 2013
Press freedom score 0-100
Sweden - 10, Germany - 17, USA - 18, Russia - 81 / 100
Legal environment 0-30
Sweden - 2, USA - 3, Germany - 6 , Russia - 25 / 30
Political environment 0-40
Sweden - 4, Germany - 7, USA - 10, Russia - 32 / 40
Economic environment 0-40
Sweden - 4, Germany - 4, USA - 5, Russia - 24 / 40

USD GNI (PPP)
Sweden 53,150
USA 48,620
Germany 44,270
Russia 10,730

Re:The difference with the USA (1)

rtb61 (674572) | about 7 months ago | (#47139533)

From Freedom House http://www.freedomhouse.org/co... [freedomhouse.org] , hardly seems an impartial group and as such its output has been snatched up for US corporate propaganda. One obvious failure of logic is Russia. It is pretty bloody obvious that Putin has to work very hard at being popular with the Russian electorate, as such their democracy must be fairly intact. Perhaps Freedom House measure democracy as to how well the public can be fooled into to believing that a corporate owned government is democratic.

It seems at the moment the real conflict between Russia and the US at the moment, is that Russia is most definitely not corporate controlled and the US which is corporate controlled is aggressively scheming and plotting to turn it into yet another corporate controlled state.

Re:The difference with the USA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47135305)

...is that Germany is much closer to being a true and functioning democracy.

While true, Germany is also closer to the size of a state like California than a country like the USA...

Re: The difference with the USA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47135343)

Bullshit. Germany censors with the best of them and puts down freedom of speech at will. In addition, they're as bad if not worse on immigration as the US is; try being a Turk who has lived all their life in Germany and tried to get citizenship.

The icing on the cake is that Germany wants to become part of Five Eyes [wikipedia.org] . Scroll on down to "Future Enlargement' and weep.

Re: The difference with the USA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47137299)

Bullshit. Germany censors with the best of them and puts down freedom of speech at will.

Surprisingly, speech is relatively free. Not as free as in the US, of course. The one main unusual limitation is that it is illegal to state disbelieve about Nazi crimes.

Even public TV is broadcasting satire shows (which more and more turn into reality-TV) showing the weirdest form of abuse of powers thinkable. Hardly anyone is watching, and even fewer people care. People only care about themselves. And should they be directly affected, they prefer to hide, than to try to change anything. Practically, there is no alternative - both major parties being corporation controlled, and all smaller parties with a concept that cannot be taken seriously.

Re: The difference with the USA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47137469)

Not doing it does not mean not having the power to, and the Basic Law says the State can do anything it feels needed to protect the State's stability and the perceived dignity of its people. Banning swastikas hasn't stopped the NPD just like banning blood in videogames never eliminated violent crime and banning hate speech hasn't made German's any more tolerant of immigrants (even, white European ones.) Having the power and being willing to use it just means waiting for what's going to get banned next since nothing ever seems to come off the list.

Re:The difference with the USA (1)

cpghost (719344) | about 7 months ago | (#47137035)

I wouldn't place my hopes on the Bundestag. They are being controlled by a grand coalition of CDU and SPD, both parties being traditionally more pro-surveillance than pro-civil rights.

Re:The difference with the USA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47137445)

Functioning is a questionable term. For all the people it employees it never seems to be accomplishing much. What's the saying? The bureaucracy is expanding to meet the needs of the expanding bureaucracy?

Gonna do what on what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47134905)

Shoestring? Jeez Louise, no shoestrings.

German Intell is like German TV, so bad it's funny.

If only Erich Mielke could still be with us (2)

Opportunist (166417) | about 7 months ago | (#47134941)

25 years too late, his wet dream coming true.

Not long from now... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47135001)

There's a NSA protein in every one of your cells, waiting to be activated.

Re:Not long from now... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47135969)

Scientists now are experimenting with our DNA at unprecedented levels like correcting bad genes, curing all DNA based diseases, trying to make DNA naturally resistant to cancer (some people are more susceptible than others), as well as designer babes (parents want their child to be the tallest, fittest, strongest AND brainiest kid in the whole high school.)

It would only seem fitting for said scientists to put some form of DNA backdoor in the future, can you say 'nanotech'?

Social protest today - terrorism tomorrow (3, Informative)

Flytrap (939609) | about 7 months ago | (#47135003)

Facebook, Twitter, et al are tools for terrorists planning to do whatever terrorists do

Sounds eerily like the same thing that dictators have been saying for years when citizens organise themselves on social networks like Facebook and Twitter.

Heck, it was just two short years ago that we were hailing the ability for the common folk in Arab countries to organise themselves on social networks like Facebook and Twitter, outside the watchful eye of state agencies, and plot the often violent overthrow of an unpopular government.

Surely if organising violent protest action on social networks was good for the Arab Spring, it should be good for the European Spring

So... what has changed... have the roosters come home to roost!?

Re:Social protest today - terrorism tomorrow (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47135047)

... have the roosters come home to roost!?

... have the roosters come home to pigeon!?

FTFY

Re:Social protest today - terrorism tomorrow (1)

AHuxley (892839) | about 7 months ago | (#47139041)

So... what has changed... have the roosters come home to roost!?
The German and French police experiences of the 1970's and 1980's via peace, workers, law reform groups and the use of early computer networks is been folded into everyday policing.
Facial recognition, computer learning/tracking of written web 2.0 content, voice and web cam collection are all part of keeping one step ahead of the formation of all protest groups.
After individuals have been identified they can be tracked, sorted and appropriate action can be focused on the person. The option to set up, turn into an informant, been used to divide a group or offered an easy way out if they just stop protesting can be considered.
What makes Germany more legally interesting is the pro democracy laws that can put any group left or right under long term watch once legally found to be a problem for German democracy. A neat legal gift left in German law after ww2.
The rest of the tame protesters can be herded into established groups that are 100% gov controlled or totally tracked to do pointless busy work around political ideas with no traction with the wider public.
The mass French protest experience and national coordination with early networking via Minitel https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/... [wikipedia.org] will not be allowed to form on German web 2.0.

The German gov hopes German protesters will see organizing on web 2.0 as risky as a telephone in 1980's East German once on a list.
You chat on web 2.0, protest, your under easy to see active watch, tracked, approached by name and offered gov terms: work with the gov, stop now or expect jail 'soon'.
What the German gov has forgotten is East Germans turned up at churches and protested, risked prison, loss of jobs, loss of eduction, loss of family.

Pics or it didn't happen. (5, Informative)

king neckbeard (1801738) | about 7 months ago | (#47135009)

If you are going to make the claim that terrorism happens on facebook and twitter, how about showing posts that this happens, because I have a hard time believing that anyone but the most incompetent terrorists would do so, and we can catch incompetent terrorists without sacrificing civil liberties.

Re:Pics or it didn't happen. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47135067)

It goes something like this:

"My buddy Omar just went to the drug store to buy some sulfuric and nitric acid, or something. I dunno what it's for. But when he's back, I'll ask him to like your facebook page too."

Re:Pics or it didn't happen. (1)

spacefight (577141) | about 7 months ago | (#47135141)

It's all part of the 'create-fear-by-telling-lies' departments. It has been all the way since 9/11. FUD at its best.

Re:Pics or it didn't happen. (1)

aliquis (678370) | about 7 months ago | (#47135269)

I'm in a Facebook group against safari park hunting, pro-animal rescuing (think animal shelter and adoption) and freedom to all the animals in meat factories and fur farms.

Now I don't know whatever they are active but I'm sure at least the later count as "terrorism" by some.

Re:Pics or it didn't happen. (1)

aliquis (678370) | about 7 months ago | (#47135287)

and freedom to all the animals in meat factories and fur farms.

Now I don't know whatever they are active but I'm sure at least the later count as "terrorism" by some.

It's like helping someone slaves escape. WTF! You bastard what have you done!?

Re:Pics or it didn't happen. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47135357)

And since Zuckerberg is now branded as a Zionist, no self-respecting anti-Israeli terrorist should use Facebook. As of Twitter, well, using it is to support American cultural imperialism. No self-respecting anti-American terrorist should use such a tool. Therefore, the only terrorists one should be able to find there are the remains of right-wing terrorist groups and various political groups and parties influencing the next elections with their intolerable views on social justice and notices of genuine problems like corruption and the care of elderly and disabled.

Re:Pics or it didn't happen. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47137795)

.

Re:Pics or it didn't happen. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47137999)

Does it really matter whether it happened?

The fact of the matter is that terrorists, criminals, whatever, will use anything they can find to facilitate their communcations. Farcebook and twaddle COULD be used for communications by people wanted by the authorities, so the authorities are going to want access to farcebook and twaddle. Whether they get access formally or informally (i.e. illegitimately), if they want access, they will get it. If you do anything in public, and farcebook and twaddle are effectively public, you should assume that anything you say will be read by the authorities.

Act accordingly.

Hey German Intelligence Agency (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47135053)

Connection Metadata, do you speak it?

This is old news (1)

bhima (46039) | about 7 months ago | (#47135097)

I live in Austria and for the past decade there has been a steady stream of news indicating that several European governments have on going programing which are similar and/or complementary to those the Americans are running.

Moreover, as is the case with reports dealing with American programs, when they say "will soon implement", "working on", or "future programs" it's most often the case that such programs are already in place and now what is being worked on is mechanism to use the data they produce in the prosecution regular domestic crimes.

Not a surprise (2)

sasparillascott (1267058) | about 7 months ago | (#47135125)

Snowden showed that all of the big European governments went along with the U.S. as it rolled out its secret total surveillance of electronic communications. Of course there are the really close co-operators (Britain, Australia and some others), but they all went along with it. Of course Europe had trains blowing up etc. to push them along.

From what has been shown, not a single big government didn't run with the U.S. down that path to where their govts can know everything about the general population - just like East Germany wanted.

This was one of the goals of Bin Laden, destroying the freedoms inherent in the west...he succeeded here. The sad thing is not a single government realized having a total surveillance state is incompatible with have a true Democracy (mid to longer term) where privacy and freedom are required. Europe has the best chance of turning over this garbage.

Well... (1)

spacefight (577141) | about 7 months ago | (#47135129)

... the rich and powerful elite behind todays governments and therefore also the secret services will learn hopefully soon enough, that their wealth and power is worth nothing, absolutely nothing if you face a large turnaround in society regarding civil rights and privacy rights. Good luck.

Re:Well... (2)

lagomorpha2 (1376475) | about 7 months ago | (#47135679)

... the rich and powerful elite behind todays governments and therefore also the secret services will learn hopefully soon enough, that their wealth and power is worth nothing, absolutely nothing if you face a large turnaround in society regarding civil rights and privacy rights. Good luck.

You seem to be under the impression the same laws apply to the rich elites as apply to the working class.

Re:Well... (1)

spacefight (577141) | about 7 months ago | (#47137517)

Not at all... But we have seen people overthrowing governments lately. It can happen in the west too.

Thank you Mr. Snowden (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47135131)

I, for one, want to thank you, Mr. Snowden, for being brave enough to go beyond outing just domestic US surveillance. There are those too ignorant to think otherwise, but I thank you for not only weakening US foreign intelligence capabilities, but escalating the same capabilities internationally. You are truly a citizen of the world and I hope you reap all the benefits you deserve. I eagerly await your damning exposé on the Russian and Chinese intelligence services, on which I expect you are working diligently.

Facebook, Twitter, et al are tools for terrorists (2)

nurb432 (527695) | about 7 months ago | (#47135243)

So is knowledge, so lets ban books. So are vocal cords and eyes...

NSA: Big Asshole (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#47135521)

BND: Little Asshole. Quite disgusting, actually.

I was ripped off (1)

ssufficool (1836898) | about 7 months ago | (#47139321)

I was only paid 2 million. Geez, I should have kept the redistribution rights.
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