Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Thai Police: We'll Get You For Online Social Media Criticism

timothy posted about 4 months ago | from the yes-your-preeminence dept.

Censorship 86

wired_parrot (768394) writes 'After a leading protester of the recent military coup in Thailand made several critical posts in Facebook criticizing the military takeover, Thailand's Technology Crime Suppression Division tracked his location through his IP address and promptly arrested him.. The arrested was meant to send a message to Thailand's online community. Said the police: "I want to tell any offenders on social media that police will come get you."'

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

FB gave the ip address, thank you! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47185787)

FB gave the ip address, thank you!

Re:FB gave the ip address, thank you! (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47185843)

I think he was tricked to visiting some site, more likely - and wasn't really trying to hide the ip. or it's a plant pr job.

Anyhow, a while ago, the junta blocked Facebook for the whole country for a while apparently because they had no idea how the internet works and had ordered some "Facebook pages" to be blocked(and later their pr making some comment about wanting to make better filtering for their main internet connection, I can only guess that they want the same kind of MITM capability that nsa is running, I have zero faith in them actually accomplishing that as it's anyones guess if even the friggin isp's in Thai know where their traffic is routed out of the country and how. You can buy residential fiber in many areas in Thailand but you might just as well buy cable due to their fucked up routing).

At least they got scandily clad women in military style clothers singing songs in Bangkok.

Running VPN's to outside Thailand is pretty common too - and if you're wondering why they aren't blocking Twitter, Facebook and Line(it's a whatsup clone that everyone uses) the reason is two pronged: it would get them too much flack and frankly the leader of the Junta doesn't care too much since he's pretty.. how to say.. old ways guy, stuck in old media - but on the other hand if he would block them then his political career would be over due to the uproar(he has a political career now and was about to get age based forced retirement from military later this year).

The reason why the coup hasn't had much effect in about anything except 10-20% drop in tourism is quite simple: the Thais had not been getting anything done in the last year anyways due to unwillingness of police and military to get involved in politics the proper way - they didn't secure the voting, they didn't arrest people who had insurrection charges and were openly plotting overthrowing of the elected government through unconstitutional means(and were charged even - and the cops knew exactly where they were and when).

sue they just went form a paralyzed government(which might have not been doing anything even without extra interference because hey, they're Thais) to a overburdened military ran government with a leader with aspirations to run for next PM himself, he better because technically he needs amnesty after this debacle, but like always he might not even bother with that since if the old Elite ways are kept he wont get charged even if he drives drunk over a cop - and status like that is what the old thais are afraid of losing and that's why they backed the demonstrators with loads of raw cash (when they claim they love the King, what they really love is acting like being royalty in medieval times).

Re:FB gave the ip address, thank you! (1)

Type44Q (1233630) | about 4 months ago | (#47185989)

At least they got scandily clad women in military style clothers singing songs in Bangkok.

This is why I like modern Buddhist cultures [like Thailand and Tibet]; they refuse to stereotype themselves and become clichés. :p

Re:FB gave the ip address, thank you! (1)

Type44Q (1233630) | about 4 months ago | (#47185997)

and become clichÃf©s

That should've read "cliches" (so much for the apparently-exotic punctuation...).

Re:FB gave the ip address, thank you! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47186089)

TESTING: clichés
(captcha irony -- if this works -- sporadic)

Accented caracters (1)

DrYak (748999) | about 4 months ago | (#47186165)

use HTML entities [wikipedia.org] like "é" :
"cliché" give "cliché"

Slashdot failure (1)

Immerman (2627577) | about 4 months ago | (#47186627)

Why should we have to resort to such shenanigans when anyone with an appropriate keyboard or a 'nix-style Compose Key configured (I recommend Win Compose if you're not running a 'nix) can enter the characters in a cross-program compatible manner far more easily? This is a clear failure on the part of the Slashdot code, which has been operating an overly-aggressive unicode blacklist on comments for far too long.

Salshdot is US based (1)

DrYak (748999) | about 4 months ago | (#47186745)

Why should we have to resort to such shenanigans

Because Slashdot is US based and is english speaking, and nearly all the discussions here can there for fit within basic ASCII char-set. (Except a few loan-words which are acceptable without accented chars anyway).

The fact that you and I come from other regions and speak other languages won't change the fact that Slashdot doesn't give a fuck about non-english language and their scripts. Support for UTF-8 is not a vital necessity on /.

On the other hand, motivated people like me have found a compatible way around.

Also, given the avarage geekness here around, html entities don't feel that far stretched. Probably half the /. readership has edited HTML source in vi or emacs (depending on religion).

Re:Salshdot is US based (1)

Immerman (2627577) | about 4 months ago | (#47186827)

Actually, if I recall correctly the Slashdot codebase is UTF-8 compliant, but they had some abuses quite some time back and blacklisted the vast majority of the unicode code pages as a result, most of which aren't actually vulnerable to abuse.

Meanwhile, I'm actually an English-speaking American who uses a compose key to easily include exponents, subscripts, extended mathematical symbols, etc. when typing. And Slashdot is one of the few places I can't even include a proper degree-symbol in my comment.

Re:Salshdot is US based (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47187481)

It is not UTF-8 compliant. Try making a facebook (or whatever) account with non-ascii characters and login in with it here. It serves up an Internal Server Error.

Re:Salshdot is US based (1)

lister king of smeg (2481612) | about 4 months ago | (#47187613)

Probably half the /. readership has edited HTML source in vi or emacs depending on religion.

Does using nano for text editing then mean I am an athiest then?

Re:FB gave the ip address, thank you! (1)

phantomfive (622387) | about 4 months ago | (#47186941)

The reason why the coup hasn't had much effect in about anything except 10-20% drop in tourism is quite simple:

Because they have a coup every few years so they have practice in making it run smoothly?

Re:FB gave the ip address, thank you! (1)

mjwx (966435) | about 4 months ago | (#47192509)

The reason why the coup hasn't had much effect in about anything except 10-20% drop in tourism is quite simple:

Because they have a coup every few years so they have practice in making it run smoothly?

Spoken like a person who has never been to Thailand.

Thai's dont run anything smoothly. You cant even get prompt service in restaurants, things happen in their own time there.

Re:FB gave the ip address, thank you! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47187969)

The reason why the coup hasn't had much effect in about anything except 10-20% drop in tourism is quite simple: the Thais had not been getting anything done in the last year anyways due to unwillingness of police and military to get involved in politics the proper way - they didn't secure the voting, they didn't arrest people who had insurrection charges and were openly plotting overthrowing of the elected government through unconstitutional means(and were charged even - and the cops knew exactly where they were and when).

sue they just went form a paralyzed government(which might have not been doing anything even without extra interference because hey, they're Thais) to a overburdened military ran government with a leader with aspirations to run for next PM himself, he better because technically he needs amnesty after this debacle, but like always he might not even bother with that since if the old Elite ways are kept he wont get charged even if he drives drunk over a cop - and status like that is what the old thais are afraid of losing and that's why they backed the demonstrators with loads of raw cash (when they claim they love the King, what they really love is acting like being royalty in medieval times).

You talk like you know what you're talking about; that's a great piece of FUD. But the truth is far from that.

The King of Thailand, Bhumibol Adulyadej, is an extraordinarily popular person and is credited with keeping Thailand relatively free and secure from outside influence during his reign. His ancestors are credited with keeping Thailand free from colonialism when everyone else around them fell apart. However, the so called "elected government" you refer to is anti-monarchical and extremely and dangeroulsy populist, and their party the UDD, run by Thaksin Shinawatra and his sister (the deposed Prime Minister) Yingluck Shinawatra, used quite a few underhanded tactics to get elected. They were the ones riling people up in the streets with their group the red shirts in a move that is similar to the Brown Shirt movement used by the Nazis to gain power in Germany.

The military stepped in because they are staunch monarchists; their leader General Prayuth has always been a fierce supporter of stability which is highly tied to the monarchy in Thailand. The Red Shirts and the UDD are opposing that stability, trying to gain power through chaos and violence in the streets. As much as we may hate coup's or dictatorships here in the West, the government that was overthrown was a far more destabilizing force.

Happy Saturday from The Golden Girls! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47185789)

Thank you for being a friend
Traveled down the road and back again
Your heart is true, you're a pal and a cosmonaut.

And if you threw a party
Invited everyone you knew
You would see the biggest gift would be from me
And the card attached would say, thank you for being a friend.

Re:Happy Saturday from The Golden Girls! (1)

Greg Heller (3031971) | about 4 months ago | (#47186097)

Isn't it a pal and a confidant?

"tracked his location through his IP address" (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47185791)

They must've had a GUI interface made in Visual Basic.

Pointless (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47185795)

This will only catch idiots. Smart people (the ones who are more dangerous) will be driven even more underground, using encrypted chats, sneakernets, and ways to mask IP like VPNs. Bit if what they want is to "make an example", it might work.

Re:Pointless (1)

BitZtream (692029) | about 4 months ago | (#47185805)

... and all of those thing you say ... which don't apply to anything other than silly movies ... will fix posting publicly on social media HOW exactly?

You've seen the Matrix or Sneakers one to many times.

Re:Pointless (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47185813)

... and all of those thing you say ... which don't apply to anything other than silly movies

I think it is you who has been watching too many movies, as you seem to think that the police have infinite resources and powers. There are many things to do that will greatly decrease the chances of them catching you, especially for a government such as Thailand's.

Only if the person is ignorant does he get caught this easily.

will fix posting publicly on social media HOW exactly?

That depends on the information you give away.

Re:Pointless (1)

BitZtream (692029) | about 4 months ago | (#47185861)

Then you really don't know anything about how automated finding someone based on an online profile is. The software has been written, the automation done. It takes VERY LITTLE resources for the system to put it all together. All but the most dedicated and vigilant people will leave enough of a trace that they can be easily tracked down.

That depends on the information you give away.

In order to actually talk to a website, you leave enough information behind to be found, especially with Tor infiltration.

You simply aren't as clever as you think you are, even if you don't realize how easy it is to figure out who you are.

Re:Pointless (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47185897)

Then you really don't know anything about how automated finding someone based on an online profile is.

Useless if you don't give them much to go on. Then it's more difficult.

They found this guy so easily because he made it so easy to find him. I am not saying it is possible to be 100% secure, but you can't deny that there are ways to make it very difficult for them to find you. And Thailand's government doesn't have nearly as many resources as the US government.

In order to actually talk to a website, you leave enough information behind to be found, especially with Tor infiltration.

Yeah, but again, they don't have infinite resources. You can make it difficult enough.

Re:Pointless (2)

rmdingler (1955220) | about 4 months ago | (#47185907)

In order to actually talk to a website, you leave enough information behind to be found, especially with Tor infiltration.

You simply aren't as clever as you think you are, even if you don't realize how easy it is to figure out who you are.

Which is why it is vital that we not magnanimously accept its warrant-less use against us by our governors.

Re:Pointless (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47186093)

(different AC)

All but the true scotsmen will leave enough of a trace that they can be easily tracked down.

FTFY

You simply aren't as clever as you think you are, even if you don't realize how easy it is to figure out who you are.

You have absolutely no idea how clever the previous AC is, or how clever he thinks he is. What we've learned recently is that our own NSA is mortal and fallable, so Thailand's Technology Crime Suppression Division is probably much less sophisticated.

I'm sorry, but I'm starting to lose patience with the whole "just give up on privacy, big brother has won" crowd. You people are boring and defeatist, and I simply refuse to live in your future. Grow a pair and fight back!

Re:Pointless (1)

westlake (615356) | about 4 months ago | (#47186479)

This will only catch idiots. Smart people (the ones who are more dangerous) will be driven even more underground, using encrypted chats, sneakernets, and ways to mask IP like VPNs.

Preaching to the choir.

If you want to be politically effective you need to have significant visibility -- presence and recognition --- above-ground.

You need to take chances.

Re:Pointless (1)

Aighearach (97333) | about 4 months ago | (#47187703)

This will only catch idiots. Smart people (the ones who are more dangerous) will be driven even more underground, using encrypted chats, sneakernets, and ways to mask IP like VPNs. Bit if what they want is to "make an example", it might work.

They're not trying to "make an example" they're trying to get the violence and conflict to stop. There were grenade attacks, etc., that were becoming much too "normal" a feature of political protests.

Furthermore, the Thai constitution is easy to change, and is only a few years old. There is no traditional Constitution for the people to fall back on. There is no tradition or history of democracy. Like early Americans, they care a lot more about civil rights than "democracy." They share similar negative views of "mob rule" that the US "Founding Fathers" did. And rightly so; their recent history of "democracy" has largely featured rather open corruption and nepotism.

They do have a traditional value of meritocracy, so seeing corrupt politicians plunder billions from their nation and replace career workers with cousins, it really bothers a lot of people. If they had a strong Constitution, like the US does, then preserving and strengthening it would make sense. But they don't, and the one they have, most Thais don't even know what it says. They do know that it was not the result of any sort of national dialogue about what it should say, though.

That is the current situation; the military sat both sides down and asked them what their plan was for how to start a national dialogue and work towards a Constitution that represents Thai values. Nobody had any idea for that, they just wanted to engage in a sort of emotive bickering that is unique to places without a history of Democratic ideals.

Here in the US the politics is emotive, but they have to at least pretend to have real points and policies and positions; in Thailand there is not even that expectation. They tend to start and end at raw, emotive accusations and hyperbole. That is why they have low voter turnout, and there seems to be a "silent majority" that supports the King and national unity, but doesn't support any of the political groups.

For people from countries with a Democratic tradition it is very hard to comprehend that the military isn't taking over to rule, and that this is actually a restoration of more traditional Thai government. If you look at Thai history, unlike most places, massacres happen at the hand of civilian groups, and then the military steps in to restore peace. The military takes over when the people start fighting in the streets. The people support the military because they do not want to fight a civil war over political BS, and there is no underlying issue or abuse that warrants war.

Elections will happen as soon as the sides are willing to sit down and come up with a plan to fix the politics, to enact a robust system. The past system was so broken that when the Prime Minister called early elections, she stopped being a real PM, and became a caretaker; then when the election failed, everything was up-in-the-air. That is not a robust system. Democracy had failed, due to the low quality of the Constitution. So far nobody is even proposing a consensus replacement that would allow for some sort of National Unity government. Once they get used to not being allowed to behave like children and also have power, they'll start to make those sorts of proposals. I give it 9 months to start serious talks, 2 years to fail at that a couple times, and then another 6 months to plan elections.

Not surprising. (2)

msauve (701917) | about 4 months ago | (#47185797)

Thailand is one of the few countries which still has Lèse-majesté laws, too.

Re:Not surprising. (1)

shikaisi (1816846) | about 4 months ago | (#47185955)

Don't think that Thailand is unique. It could happen in your country too if you don't take action to prevent it.

Re:Not surprising. (0)

callmetheraven (711291) | about 4 months ago | (#47186353)

Say something about a protected race in the US and see how the "law" behaves. (I put law in quotes because in the US these days the law is a person not a rule.) Donald Sterling.

The Bell Curve (1)

tepples (727027) | about 4 months ago | (#47186785)

Did the authorities start shit with Charles Murray over The Bell Curve [wikipedia.org] ?

Re:Not surprising. (1)

shutdown -p now (807394) | about 4 months ago | (#47189153)

Say something about a protected race in the US and see how the "law" behaves

Nothing happens, because SCOTUS has ruled [wikipedia.org] it to be protected by the First Amendment many years ago.

Re:Not surprising. (1)

Aighearach (97333) | about 4 months ago | (#47187739)

Nonsense, Thailand has those laws only because the King is so popular the "populist" politicians refuse to remove them, and so do the elitists, even though the King has stated in clear and simple language that he believes people should be allowed to criticize him, or anyone, openly.

It could only happen in a place where the average person on the street is offended by insults to the King.

Few places in the world have a monarchy with a good enough history for that to be the case. Notice how through all the changes in Thai government and coups and new Constitutions, those laws always remain?

I mean, is that your fear? That having a history of great Kings and a lack of really bad ones is something that can happen anywhere? Because I doubt that is so.

Re:Not surprising. (1)

mjwx (966435) | about 4 months ago | (#47192487)

Nonsense, Thailand has those laws only because the King is so popular the "populist" politicians refuse to remove them, and so do the elitists, even though the King has stated in clear and simple language that he believes people should be allowed to criticize him, or anyone, openly.

This, The King of Thailand has as much real political power as the Queen of England. He's openly requested the removal of the Leste Majesty laws in Thailand but the politicians have refused because they're such a useful cudgel to use against their political enemies. Political corruption is rife in Thailand, but the monarch can do nothing about it. Also, the king grants royal pardons to people convicted of Leste Majesty. Kind of ironic, he cant get rid of the law but can pardon anyone convicted of it.

Suppression Division (1)

rmdingler (1955220) | about 4 months ago | (#47185815)

All you need to know about us is in the title.

I wish other things came so clearly marked.

Like the woman who will break your things when she leaves or the guy on the street who really doesn't need a light for his cigarette.

Re:Suppression Division (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47185857)

the woman who will break your things when she leaves or the guy on the street who really doesn't need a light for his cigarette.

The qualifiers are redundant, as the words "woman" and "guy" already imply the intended meanings.

Goats (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47185829)

King Bhumibol Adulyadej and Prayuth Chan-Ocha have sex with goats.

Re:Goats (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47185981)

King Bhumibol Adulyadej and Prayuth Chan-Ocha have sex with goats.

Ya, laugh it up. I guess it's funny when it wasn't your goats.
My goats are still in recovery, thank you very much. Typical slashdot, next you'll say that my goats were asking for it because of their pretty fur or whatever.
Slashdot has a serious goat rape culture problem.

Re:Goats (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47186313)

Well, at least with goat rape culture you know the goats have been raped.

As opposed to goat stare rape culture. Anyone looking at a goat is considered a rapist. And you're not a rapist for staring at your goats right?

Goat: Rape! Rape!
You: I'm not raping you. I'm butchering you so I can eat you.
Goat: Oh. That's all right the...HEEYYYYYY!

Re:Goats (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47186333)

The percentage of goats in leadership roles in Thailand is far too low. We need a new campaign to foster goats, to mentor them and make them feel empowered. They don't feel safe to leave the goatyard. Have you noticed the dearth of goats in the new government?

is Slashdot a social media? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47185841)

Just in case it might be, I'd better not say Thailand sucks! Now I'll go visit the local Thai restaurant for some Pad Thai.

Kettle-Pot (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47185871)

And in slashdot you can not criticize the Juden;
Of course you can insult and write the nastiest things about God the Almighty.

Do you know why?
  Because Atheists love to worship the Juden.

so much for the song (1)

cellocgw (617879) | about 4 months ago | (#47185891)

"One night in Bangkok and the world's your oyster... just don't tweet about it OR ELSE"

Doesn't have the same ring to it.

Re:so much for the song (1)

Aighearach (97333) | about 4 months ago | (#47187747)

For values of "or else" that mean you'll be temporarily detained and then released unharmed.

it was bound to happen (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47185893)

This will become the norm everywhere, soon enough. Learn to keep silent, not to make waves, not to stand out. Hold your peace. Those will be invaluable survival skills in the Brave New World to come. And by the way, what is to be gained by criticizing those in power? They're not going away. Might as well learn how to ingratiating yourself to them, for instance informing on subversive individuals. It could lead to better social standing and a better share of what scarce wealth will remain. Yes, this is what one should do.

Re:it was bound to happen (4, Informative)

just_a_monkey (1004343) | about 4 months ago | (#47185949)

But was it really forbidden to critizise the ruling class in A Brave New World? Wasn't it just that no-one did, because constant fun-and-sport-and-sexytimes made every-one both content and shallow as puddles. (Except the protagonist.) I think you want 1984.

Re:it was bound to happen (1)

geniice (1336589) | about 4 months ago | (#47186111)

It was implied that alphas did from time to time and got sent off to various islands.

Re:it was bound to happen (1)

Threni (635302) | about 4 months ago | (#47186377)

1984 is to Brave New World like the Beatles are to the Monkees. Brave New World always struck me as a little too "earnest", for want of a better word. If you're going to say something, say it. Don't create a symbol/metaphor for something. That's lame. I like the honesty of commercials from the 50's and 60's where they show you the product and describe it, rather than current ads which show you a lifestyle the advertisers think you'd like and associate that with the product (hence jet planes zooming around your bathroom in razor ads etc).

Re:it was bound to happen (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47186515)

I don't think you really grok'ed Brave New World.
The whole point was to shape society, thus ensuring stability through manipulative means.
1984 is like a bulldog to a cat. Most people prefer cats.

Brave New World, tried at a very early stage, to describe that cat. It was really way before its time in lots of interesting ways if you look at the time it was written.
The 1984-world is not really sustainable. Brave New World seems eerily stable and could almost pass within today's possibilities.

Re:it was bound to happen (1)

kaatochacha (651922) | about 4 months ago | (#47186997)

Brave New World always struck me as more probable than 1984.

A new form of protest, then? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47186003)

I suggest every Thailander take to Facebook to express acute distaste for the junta, and for the king's passive stance in the matter of their suppression of civil liberties. Surely not all can be arrested for months at a time? Same tactic as the sit-in protests really.

Re:A new form of protest, then? (1)

Aighearach (97333) | about 4 months ago | (#47187773)

They are the Thai people, not the Thailanders. The country is also just "Thai" in the Thai language. Thailand is just to make it easier on foreigners.

I encourage you to spend more time learning about them than you do trying to incite conflict. ;) You may find out that there is no Thai gulag, they're not being held for months, and that they have a broad concept of "civil liberties" that doesn't include any "right" to get blown up by grenade attacks for protesting, and it does not include a "right" for newly elected politicians to replace career government professionals with their cousins, or to plunder the national budget with no-bid contracts given to... themselves!

Also I think it is pretty obviously a breakdown in "democracy" when the elected Prime Minister is allowing a former PM (her brother) who is a wanted criminal (for corruption!) to be fairly openly running the country via video conference from an undisclosed foreign location. In most countries that would be some sort of Treason.

It is pretty hard to say that if the military did nothing, that would somehow enhance "civil liberties." It certainly isn't a proposal for how to end the troubles.

welcome to thailand! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47186009)

please be careful! use some 3 letter program that rhymes with a avenger (and know how to use it).
in reality thailand is very stable and they do have a memory that rivals that of an elephant!

Mrs Peel, we're needed (1)

tepples (727027) | about 4 months ago | (#47186805)

use some 3 letter program that rhymes with a avenger (and know how to use it).

I can't think of a 3-letter program that rhymes with Steed or Peel [wikipedia.org] .

When a service becomes an idependent institution. (3, Insightful)

hey! (33014) | about 4 months ago | (#47186071)

I often find people don't seem to understand when talking about countries like Pakistan or Egypt that the military, police and intelligence services aren't just bureaucracies within the government. They are institutions that have a life of their own, a life that is parallel to the civilian government. And when push comes to shove, the nominal subservience of the security services to civilian authority goes out the window.

And here in the US, people are already crossing the line from respecting and honoring the men and women who serve this country in uniform to revering the military as an institution, and that we should never do.

Re:When a service becomes an idependent institutio (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47186125)

Serious (not tinfoil) comment: you have three such entities in the US (on a scale that their equivalents in the UK do not come close to matching).

The FBI, the CIA and the NSA are all independent institutions with a life of their own.

The FBI has _repeatedly_ demonstrated that independence (under Hoover and after), and little regard for the constitution.

The CIA has a budget which you as citizens do not get to fully inspect, dark revenue streams that have seen it alleged to be involved in drug and arms dealing, and has been implicated in the killing of a presidential candidate. It dodges constitutional issues by largely not getting involved on home turf.

The NSA is operating outside of the constitution, plain and simple.

Your military (though I see your point about reverence, quasi-religiosity and cultural impact) is not on the same scale.

Re:When a service becomes an idependent institutio (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47186183)

I would add that if push comes to shove in the USA and the army steps in (and it would; that's what armies do), your biggest worry is which of the NSA or CIA will take control, and whether the FBI will launch an insurgency.

Re:When a service becomes an idependent institutio (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47186243)

Wow, a serious civil war amongst various branches of armed and/or security services would be quite intrigueing.

Re:When a service becomes an idependent institutio (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47186391)

Too bad it'll never happen because it's the Corporations that rule. Anyone who thinks otherwise is ignorant of reality.

Re:When a service becomes an idependent institutio (1)

khallow (566160) | about 4 months ago | (#47187389)

Reality is itself ignorant of your statement. For example, in the recent Snowden scandal, it wasn't the NSA whose leash got pulled hard, but all the businesses and people affected by them. For example, a huge slice of the US IT industry's existence is threatened by NSA actions, but for the NSA it remains business as usual.

Re:When a service becomes an idependent institutio (1)

CaptnZilog (33073) | about 4 months ago | (#47186677)

I would add that if push comes to shove in the USA and the army steps in (and it would; that's what armies do), your biggest worry is which of the NSA or CIA will take control, and whether the FBI will launch an insurgency.

Wait... you mean they aren't *already* in control?

Re:When a service becomes an idependent institutio (1)

Aighearach (97333) | about 4 months ago | (#47187867)

There is a whole lot you're wrong about there. The FBI is only independent recently, and not entirely. Made so to reduce abuse from being used politically. The CIA is not independent at all. The NSA is independent but has no law enforcement or governing structures or rights; all they can do is collect information and give it to other parts of the government, and they're substantially restricted in what they can share.

Your claim that the CIA "has been implicated in the killing of a presidential candidate" is indeed tinfoil. "Implicated" in no fact at all, "implicated" in baseless accusations by people who claim broader conspiracy, but offer no evidence of such.

The claim that the "The NSA is operating outside of the constitution, plain and simple," is only plain or simple to the same extent that it is tinfoil. It is popular to recite such a claim inside of an anti-establishment echo chamber, but that is not the same as actually being able to point to a part of the Constitution that it is somehow "outside" of. According to the Courts it is not so, and who else but the Courts makes that determination? Our Constitution is not so clearly worded. You may find if you get into the details that there is nothing simple or clear about the issues at all, but that instead that they are fuzzy and disputed, but that most people live in an echo chamber where only one view or the other is socially acceptable even to admit exists! Just admitting it is disputed what it means will tend to get you shouted down by many faux-populists.

The military OTOH is almost entirely independent other than at the very top being controlled by the President. The Secretary of Defense, for example, can't order them around; their Joint Chiefs of Staff, made up of the heads of the different branches of the military, directly control the military, and most of the President's (Commander in Chief) power is exercised by giving directives to the Joint Chiefs. So there is nobody other than the President that ties the military to the rest of government.

Note that regarding the FBI, for example you reference to Hoover, that was when the FBI was _less_ independent, and that is _why_ they are more independent; before the politicians had more power over them, now the lawyers have that power, and the politicians only get to pick the top lawyers. The CIA is also mostly banned from operating inside the USA, and the FBI is tasked with investigating the CIA on a continual basis with regards to their US activities. That was set up after the Vietnam War-era abuses by the CIA.

Re: When a service becomes an idependent instituti (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47188079)

Wow, you really didn't get what I was saying at all.

Thaland (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47186099)

Tourist murder capitol of the world.
They don't like it when you point out the number of tourists that end up getting married, leaving everything to their new thai wife, and then commiting suicide.

Re:Thaland (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47186393)

Of course they go suicide when they find out their bride has a wiener.

Back here in America (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47186129)

I'm old enough to remember the time before Obama, when you could speak out against the government and not have to worry about getting targeted by goons from the IRS.

Re:Back here in America (0)

L. J. Beauregard (111334) | about 4 months ago | (#47187721)

I'm old enough to remember the time before Obama, when you could speak out against the government and not have to worry about getting targeted by goons from the IRS.

Gee, when was that? Poor widdle teabaggers had to fill out a few extra forms. Opponents of george w. bush were herded into "free speech zones", pepper sprayed and busted for having the gall to oppose the War on Terra.

Re:Back here in America (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47188423)

When you were speaking out, was that from a cordoned off free speech zone?

Thai Revolution (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47186237)

If does seem that Thai people need another Revolution to gain freedom...

The Thai Police can go suck a foot. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47186369)

In fact they can suck both my feet.

You'd think this tactic would backfire (2)

ZorinLynx (31751) | about 4 months ago | (#47186417)

Telling people that you'll come arrest them when they speak out against you is admitting that you're not acting in the best interest of the people. Hence people will be less likely to support you in the long run than if you just allow and *gasp* maybe even listen to criticism.

These people act more like playground bullies than adults governing a nation. It's pretty sad and despicable. Imagine if they just came out and said "You may say whatever you like about us; tell us how you really feel. No harm will ever befall you for stating your opinion." The good will that would generate would be FAR more effective than arresting those who disagree with you!

Re:You'd think this tactic would backfire (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47186629)

Say what you want, however as someone living here for ten years now; since the military take over they've arrested over 100 mafia taxi drivers, corrupt politicians, and even more taking down of corrupt officials is planned. Finally progress, something that hasn't happened in decades if ever.

Everyone is tired of this bullshit between two minority political groups so no one is crying a river over these jackasses that are spewing their agendas online getting arrested. If they want to get arrested for it, let them, anything is better then more of this bullshit where protesters of either side rally up in Bangkok and ruin the place.

This isn't about freedom of speech, however much either side will try to persuade you it is with their political agendas, this is simply about shutting up the shouting match that has lasted since 2006 and trying to get people to work together before there is a civil war.

Re:You'd think this tactic would backfire (1)

Aighearach (97333) | about 4 months ago | (#47187879)

Totally agree, it is not about "freedom of speech" it is about various minority political parties taking a "time out" because of grenade attacks and other absurdities. Everybody knows "freedom of speech" will resume after the "time out."

Re:You'd think this tactic would backfire (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47188339)

Umm shutting up a shouting match is /exactly/ freedom of speech. Besides, the military elite like all ruling classes totally don't give one shit about the people. Here is hoping that they'll be able to get rid of both them and the root of their Lèse-majesté laws for supporting this coup.

the king is a retarded faggot (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47186463)

King Bhumibol Adulyadej and Prayuth Chan-Ocha have sex with dogs and cats, the price has aids and married an ex porn actress...the whole country is founded on prostitution... lets hope at least they kill all the muslims

Fuck Thai police... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47186715)

...come and get me cunts!!!

Re:Fuck Thai police... (1)

UnknownSoldier (67820) | about 4 months ago | (#47196535)

More like:

Only Cowards Censor. Fuck the Thai police and King for being cowards.

"The arrested"? (1)

flargleblarg (685368) | about 4 months ago | (#47186749)

The arrested was meant to send a message to Thailand's online community.

Come on, /. editors. Seriously?

Thailand is the new China (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47186847)

because there is a government surplus as well as a budget surplus. Fiscal sovereignty is the mother of political sovereignty. How can a nation's internal affairs be influenced from the outside if they owe no one nothing?

It's merely one more example of nations that are currently prospering are that which are blood-based. Idea-based nations (i.e. Anglosphere) are riddled with debt and illegal immigrants.

Re:Thailand is the new China (0)

L. J. Beauregard (111334) | about 4 months ago | (#47187735)

Yes, we're in hock up to our necks because Greasy Spics and Scary Mooselimbs. It has nothing to do with people baying for MOAR WAR! without being willing to pay the taxes to support it. We had a budget surplus before george w. bush got in.

If you're suggesting a final solution to the Greasy Spic/Scary Mooselimb/whatever problem, then just come out and say so.

Re:Thailand is the new China (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47188431)

>> We had a budget surplus before george w. bush got in.

Bullshit and you know it. There was only a surplus when considering Social Security receipts in excess of benefits. But, all of those excess receipts are spoken for by future liabilities, so they cannot with any honesty be considered part of available funds... of course, we have a dishonest government and an even more dishonest populace, of which you are a prime example.

You'll get you (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47187131)

And since we police work for you, you'll get you.

Outrage to the king (1)

manu0601 (2221348) | about 4 months ago | (#47188437)

Times are changing: at least they did not arrest him for outrage to the king.

Guns in the hands of the common citizens (1)

ub3r n3u7r4l1st (1388939) | about 4 months ago | (#47188665)

will solve this problem. There is a reason brutal monarchies never exists in a society where its citizens are armed.

Thailand will be a great business opportunity to Smith & Wesson.

Re:Guns in the hands of the common citizens (1)

shutdown -p now (807394) | about 4 months ago | (#47189155)

There is a reason brutal monarchies never exists in a society where its citizens are armed.

I suppose it's technically true, since e.g. Iraq under Saddam, while a quite brutal dictatorship, and with no shortage of arms in the hands of the citizens, was not a monarchy.

Re:Guns in the hands of the common citizens (1)

mjwx (966435) | about 4 months ago | (#47192525)

will solve this problem. There is a reason brutal monarchies never exists in a society where its citizens are armed.

Thailand will be a great business opportunity to Smith & Wesson.

LoL.

Go look up where Thailand is for fatal shootings per capita.

Then go look at how corrupt the political system in Thailand is.

Then realise how wrong you are.

Thigh Police? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47189771)

Cankle cops?

Check for New Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?