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Lizard Squad Bomb Threat Diverts Sony Exec's Plane To Phoenix

timothy posted about 4 months ago | from the derring-doo-doo dept.

Crime 131

As if cutting off from their games millions of users wasn't enough for the day, Forbes reports that [the] hacker collective (or individual) known as the “Lizard Squad” succeeded in taking offline many gaming services including Blizzard’s Battle.net and Sony PSN. But things took a turn from irritating DDoS attacks to another level of harassment earlier this afternoon when the group took to Twitter to announce publicly that it a believed the flight carrying Sony Online Entertainment President John Smedley had explosives on board. The flight had been bound from Dallas to San Diego, but in response to the bomb threat, the plane was diverted to Phoenix.

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Aaaand there goes the lizard squad (5, Insightful)

Shadow of Eternity (795165) | about 4 months ago | (#47746615)

Pissing off game companies is one thing. Getting the DHS involved is another entirely. They've just brought a level of hell down on themselves they are woefully unprepared to deal with.

Re:Aaaand there goes the lizard squad (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47746671)

They'll be in the cells next to Ross Ulbricht, who will explain it to them.

Re:Aaaand there goes the lizard squad (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47746717)

Seems quite possible that Sony just offered a lot of money to one of these script kiddies so that the authorities would be incentivised to do the corporation's dirty work.

The offer will never materialise.

Re:Aaaand there goes the lizard squad (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47746791)

^^ That.

With the piles of money that Sony stood to lose over any PR fallout resulting from another "hacking" scandal on the PSN network, regardless of the validity of said scandal, there is every reason to believe that they would use any means necessary to neutralize this threat. And, honestly, posing as the spokesperson for a loosely-affiliated group with no valid way to repudiate the incident is fecking trivial for any entity with the financial and technical resources of Sony.

Re:Aaaand there goes the lizard squad (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47746827)

Outlandish Claim? Check
Zero Evidence? Check.
Impossible to refute? Check.

Yes, sir, we have a typical conspiracy theory.

Re:Aaaand there goes the lizard squad (1)

knightghost (861069) | about 4 months ago | (#47746901)

Yea, that's almost as crazy at the NSA hacking and tracking pretty much everything and everyone. Oh wait...

Re: Aaaand there goes the lizard squad (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47746999)

Good point, now that one conspiracy theory has been proven correct we can safely toss all critical thinking out the window and accept every other half-wit conspiracy that appears on the internet.

Re: Aaaand there goes the lizard squad (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47749257)

Hah! I BET you'd like me to throw it all out the window. The NSA must be standing outside waiting to catch all of my critical thinking!

Re:Aaaand there goes the lizard squad (1)

Zalbik (308903) | about 4 months ago | (#47748477)

Yea, that's almost as crazy at the NSA hacking and tracking pretty much everything and everyone. Oh wait...

I'll take "Things we actually have evidence of" for $100, Alex.

Just because a major hacking incident by a corporate/government power occurred, doesn't mean that they all occurred.

Re:Aaaand there goes the lizard squad (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47748541)

The final category is: Circumstantial Evidence.

People said the suspicions about NSA overreach were "crazy" for years, but all the signs were there before Snowden released hard documents. If everyone waited to be spoon-fed facts about the world around them, rather than drawing conclusions based on life experiences and circumstantial evidence, we'd still be trying to figure out that whole "fire" thing.

Re:Aaaand there goes the lizard squad (2)

Zalbik (308903) | about 4 months ago | (#47748721)

If everyone waited to be spoon-fed facts about the world around them, rather than drawing conclusions based on life experiences and circumstantial evidence, we'd still be trying to figure out that whole "fire" thing.

Funny, I'm suspect the NSA terrorist identification manual has a very similar idea in it.

Once we start relying on gut instinct and circumstantial evidence to determine who the bad guys are, we've gone a long way down the path of becoming the bad guys ourselves.

Re:Aaaand there goes the lizard squad (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47748881)

Funny, I'm suspect the NSA terrorist identification manual has a very similar idea in it.

Do you have any evidence of this?

Re:Aaaand there goes the lizard squad (1)

Zalbik (308903) | about 4 months ago | (#47749003)

No, just circumstantial evidence.

That's it's only a suspicion, rather than "drawing conclusions based on life experiences and circumstantial evidence".

Re:Aaaand there goes the lizard squad (1)

Zalbik (308903) | about 4 months ago | (#47749019)

That's it's only a suspicion, rather than "drawing conclusions based on life experiences and circumstantial evidence".

Damnit, I need more coffee. I keep words in my sentences. That should read:

That's why it's only a suspicion, rather than "drawing conclusions based on life experiences and circumstantial evidence".

Re:Aaaand there goes the lizard squad (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47749391)

You're splitting the hair mighty thin: any conclusion drawn from circumstantial evidence is only a suspicion until it's confirmed.

Re:Aaaand there goes the lizard squad (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47747075)

Way to prove that you have no idea what constitutes a "conspiracy theory," instead opting for the popular definition embraced by the lowest common denominator of the general public. I'm sure you're proud.

Re:Aaaand there goes the lizard squad (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47747495)

The general public is the highest common denominator. Small groups of pretentious idiots living in imaginary LaLa Lands of their own Greatness are the "lowest" denominator, common or otherwise.

Re:Aaaand there goes the lizard squad (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47748421)

That sounds rather pretentious, and you're obviously a drooling idiot, evidenced by your apparent lack of reading comprehension. I don't suppose you live in some imaginary land of some sort?

Re:Aaaand there goes the lizard squad (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47747347)

+2 Insightful on a trollish anon? Nice. So, this is SlashFark, now?

Re:Aaaand there goes the lizard squad (1)

luis_a_espinal (1810296) | about 4 months ago | (#47746975)

^^ That.

With the piles of money that Sony stood to lose over any PR fallout resulting from another "hacking" scandal on the PSN network, regardless of the validity of said scandal, there is every reason to believe that they would use any means necessary to neutralize this threat. And, honestly, posing as the spokesperson for a loosely-affiliated group with no valid way to repudiate the incident is fecking trivial for any entity with the financial and technical resources of Sony.

Obligatory [slashdot.org]

The Faux News of Geekdom (4, Informative)

luis_a_espinal (1810296) | about 4 months ago | (#47746965)

Seems quite possible that Sony just offered a lot of money to one of these script kiddies so that the authorities would be incentivised to do the corporation's dirty work.

The offer will never materialise.

I can't prove it, but I can say it. - Stephen Colbert

Slashdot, where nerds forget The Law of Parsimony.

Re:The Faux News of Geekdom (1)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | about 4 months ago | (#47747001)

Perhaps some reading comprehension is in order. The OP didn't say they did it; they merely pointed out the possibility.

Re:The Faux News of Geekdom (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47747043)

Just kill yourself.

Re:The Faux News of Geekdom (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47747197)

PLEASE, if you are suffering so much that you need to encourage suicide on the internet, go see a therapist. Your negativity is infectious and can be part of a larger problem that may lead to the downfall of civilization and human kind.

Re:The Faux News of Geekdom (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47747247)

Maybe he should kill himself. You know, lead by example.

Re:The Faux News of Geekdom (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47747611)

Perhaps some reading comprehension is in order. The OP didn't say they did it; they merely pointed out the possibility.

Ok, sure, and I'm not calling you a pig-fucker, but do we have any evidence you're not fucking pigs? It's a question we really should be asking, because it's a definite possibility! (/sarcasm)

If someone is just "pointing out a possibility", they really do mean to make the accusation. They're just trying to use weasel-phrasing so they can later claim they didn't really accuse SOE of engaging in illegal criminal activities, even though that is absolutely exactly what they meant, and they and every single person who read it knows that that is exactly what they meant.

Re:The Faux News of Geekdom (1)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | about 4 months ago | (#47747989)

No. They mean before juming to the conclusion that all is as it appears, consider the other very distinct possibilities.

Re:The Faux News of Geekdom (1)

Oligonicella (659917) | about 4 months ago | (#47748453)

Except, of course, the distinctiveness is rather shaky instead of "very". It reads as a weasely accusation.

Re:The Faux News of Geekdom (1)

luis_a_espinal (1810296) | about 4 months ago | (#47749233)

No. They mean before juming to the conclusion that all is as it appears, consider the other very distinct possibilities .

Obligatory : https://www.youtube.com/watch?... [youtube.com]

Re:The Faux News of Geekdom (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47749227)

Just so he's not a hog-fucker. 'cause that is gay.

Re:The Faux News of Geekdom (3, Insightful)

luis_a_espinal (1810296) | about 4 months ago | (#47749219)

Perhaps some reading comprehension is in order. The OP didn't say they did it; they merely pointed out the possibility.

Oh well, in that case, let me point out the possibility that Elvis is still alive, that the Moon landings were a hoax filmed at a NASA's garage, that 9/11 was masterminded by the Rothschild family and "The Protocols of the Elders of Zion" is a real, historical document.

Hell, here is another possibility. Obama ordered it because Benghazi. Or better yet, maybe Bush ordered Cheney to assemble a bunch of hackers back in 2007, but these hackers went rogue for lack of sex or whatever, beyond the original, official parameters of their mission, which did not include making fake bomb threats.

It is possible. You cannot prove it to me that this is not possible.

To borrow your own words, I am merely pointing out the possibility. Again, I cannot prove it (that the possibility is false), but I can say it (pointing it out.)

Anything that is not mathematically provable to be impossible is, by definition, possible. But just because something is possible, it does not make it reasonable. It certainly does not imply that such thing is even noteworthy of consideration.

Again, Law of Parsimony, or Occam's Razor or whatever you want to call it. If people want to spend brain cells in merely pointing out the possibility of really stupid, inane, batshit crazy conspiracy theories, whatever rocks their proverbial boats. They should not expect not to be called on it, though.

Re:The Faux News of Geekdom (1)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | about 4 months ago | (#47749347)

Why would I object to you pointing out those possibilities?

Re:The Faux News of Geekdom (0)

luis_a_espinal (1810296) | about 4 months ago | (#47749205)

Seems quite possible that Sony just offered a lot of money to one of these script kiddies so that the authorities would be incentivised to do the corporation's dirty work.

The offer will never materialise.

I can't prove it, but I can say it. - Stephen Colbert

Slashdot, where nerds forget The Law of Parsimony.

Perhaps some reading comprehension is in order. The OP didn't say they did it; they merely pointed out the possibility.

Oh well, in that case, let me point out the possibility that Elvis is still alive, that the Moon landings were a hoax filmed at a NASA's garage, that 9/11 was masterminded by the Rothschild family, the Chupacabra is related to the Yeti and Kim Kardashian, and "The Protocols of the Elders of Zion" is a real, historical document.

Hell, here is another possibility. Obama ordered the hacking and bomb threat because Benghazi. Or better yet, maybe Bush ordered Cheney to assemble a bunch of hackers back in 2007, but these hackers went rogue for lack of sex or whatever, beyond the original, official parameters of their mission, which did not include making fake bomb threats.

It is possible. You cannot prove it to me that this is not possible.

To borrow your own words, I am merely pointing out the possibility. Again, I cannot prove it (that the possibility is false), but I can say it (pointing it out.)

Anything that is not mathematically provable to be impossible is, by definition, possible. But just because something is possible, it does not make it reasonable. It certainly does not imply that such thing is even noteworthy of consideration.

Again, Law of Parsimony, or Occam's Razor or whatever you want to call it. If people want to spend brain cells in merely pointing out the possibility of really stupid, inane, batshit crazy conspiracy theories, whatever rocks their proverbial boats. They should not expect not to be called on it, though.

self-post snafu (1)

luis_a_espinal (1810296) | about 4 months ago | (#47749255)

Aggg, I replied to myself instead of replying to someone else's post.

Lulzsec 2.0 (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47746733)

Except this time there will be no lulz, only se(cs), of the anal kind.

Re:Lulzsec 2.0 (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47747413)

Someone will get the lulz

Re:Aaaand there goes the lizard squad (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47746781)

What evidence was there that this bomb threat was even possible or credible? The real victims are the law abiding citizens.

Re:Aaaand there goes the lizard squad (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47746795)

Welcome to the next level of swatting.

Re:Aaaand there goes the lizard squad (5, Interesting)

argStyopa (232550) | about 4 months ago | (#47746983)

Agreed.
I can't mod this + enough.
There seems to be a sort of collective dismissal of the power of government in hacker circles, as if the fact that some faceless bureaucrat in a lowly department failing to deploy a firewall to protect trivial information, or the FBI wasting billion$ on a worthless systems upgrade, were representative of the technological competency of the whole of the US gov't.

I doubt that's the case.

What people fail to understand is that the government is *huge* and as easy as it is to find laughable examples of waste, abuse, and outright incompetence, that's only one end of the bell curve.

The OTHER end has incredibly competent people, giant fat gobs of money, and a wealth of resources that beggar the imagination (ie if they need something and cannot ask for or buy it, they can resort to overt legalities like subpoenas, or not-so-legal methods like property condemnation, deportation, or IRS audits) to compel behavior in pursuit of their goals. Further, the great bulk of the US populace (ie not the very vocal 0.01% on internet chat boards) is IN FAVOR OF LAW AND ORDER, full stop, and will cheerfully volunteer cooperation to "the authorities" however they can. The US federal gov't has tremendous credibility with most of the population.

My point is enthusiastically reiterating the OP: it's one thing to hack some nerd-gamer servers, but when you attack the infrastructure of the US (and make no mistake, that's what this was) you will come to the attention of the 'sharp, pointy' end of the bellcurve.

Good luck with that.

Re:Aaaand there goes the lizard squad (4, Interesting)

Type44Q (1233630) | about 4 months ago | (#47747713)

The US federal gov't has tremendous credibility with most of the population.

Oops. You were actually doing quite well until you screwed-up by blurting-out the above load of nonsense: as gullible and dumb as most of the population is, Uncle Sam hardly has "tremendous credibility with most of them."

Re:Aaaand there goes the lizard squad (1)

Type44Q (1233630) | about 4 months ago | (#47747781)

Mind you, if you were to include mainstream media as a branch of the government (which would not be unreasonable, at least from the perspective of someone who has a good idea how things actually work), then your statement would have been a lot less inaccurate...

Re:Aaaand there goes the lizard squad (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47748177)

The multinational corporations are the citizenry now. With them, the government does indeed have credibility with them, because it's theirs. They bought it with the money you gave them up front and it's financed with the money taken from you in back (taxes).

Re:Aaaand there goes the lizard squad (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47748689)

elections

Re:Aaaand there goes the lizard squad (2)

Dutch Gun (899105) | about 4 months ago | (#47748739)

Oops. You were actually doing quite well until you screwed-up by blurting-out the above load of nonsense: as gullible and dumb as most of the population is, Uncle Sam hardly has "tremendous credibility with most of them."

Slashdot is probably not a typical sampling of the US population and their feelings of the government, and "Credibility" doesn't necessarily mean "blind trust" or "unwavering devotion to".

Nor do, I feel, most people view "the government" as a single, monolithic entity, even though it's often referred to as such. For example: would you say that most people feel rather differently about the NSA versus the US Postal Service? How about the National Guard versus the US Congress? The CIA versus the Census Bureau?

In general, when the FBI or DHS goes after guys like these, I'd posit that the typical American has exactly zero problems with those efforts, and I think that's what GP was indicating.

Re:Aaaand there goes the lizard squad (1)

chemicaldave (1776600) | about 4 months ago | (#47747761)

I think it's less about technical know how and more about now having the authority to issue warrants to service providers and connect the dots.

Re:Aaaand there goes the lizard squad (3, Interesting)

AmiMoJo (196126) | about 4 months ago | (#47748257)

That's assuming that they have jurisdiction. If Lizard Squad is not in the US... Well, better hope their country is on good terms with you guys and is willing to hand them over.

Re:Aaaand there goes the lizard squad (4, Insightful)

Dutch Gun (899105) | about 4 months ago | (#47748827)

Oh, I'd wager they're almost certainly in the US, or at least another relatively wealthy country with an extradition treaty. They're also probably a bunch of teenage males from moderately well-off families, and who have far more free time and impotent angst than good sense. Anyone living in an area with lots of real-world problems as opposed to first-world problems wouldn't bother targeting videogame companies or Sony executives.

Re: Aaaand there goes the lizard squad (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47748737)

Whatever makes you believe that the public infrastructure was hacked? It's just as likely there was a gamer in the airport or onborad the very same flight as the Sony exec and the information necessary to make the threat seem credible was purely coincidental. Of course DHS couldn't risk the consequence of being inattentive to a tweet, since the entire US intelligence strategy is laser-focused on Total (electronic) Information Awareness to the growing exclusion of hum-Intel.

The growing cost of security overhead is a prime factor in the collapse of empires, according to Jared Diamond. Perhaps this should become a new thread for Slashdot. You could call it Tweeting While Rome Fuses.

Independence Day (1)

ThatsNotPudding (1045640) | about 4 months ago | (#47749151)

What people fail to understand is that the government is *huge* and as easy as it is to find laughable examples of waste, abuse, and outright incompetence, that's only one end of the bell curve.

"Did you really think they were spending $500 on a hammer?"

Way to taunt the Juggernaut (4, Insightful)

luis_a_espinal (1810296) | about 4 months ago | (#47747025)

Pissing off game companies is one thing. Getting the DHS involved is another entirely. They've just brought a level of hell down on themselves they are woefully unprepared to deal with.

My thoughts exactly. These kids better find a cave or a hole on the ground somewhere near the Khyber Pass or Timbuktu. Making bomb threats/pranks? There is a whole lot of angry coming right at them right now, the likes you can only escape by being a government entity, not some stupid script kiddie.

Re:Way to taunt the Juggernaut (2)

neoritter (3021561) | about 4 months ago | (#47747453)

There's already a whole lot of angry coming at them right now, they stopped me from playing GTA V online yesterday... :O

In all seriousness, I think the fastest way to make your hacking group completely hated is to hack gamers. Lulzsec and Anonymous to some degree, were completely despised after what they to gamers.

Re:Aaaand there goes the lizard squad (1)

oddaddresstrap (702574) | about 4 months ago | (#47747721)

Reminds one of the scene in Burn After Reading where Chad tries to blackmail Osbourne Cox:

Osbourne Cox: If you ever carried out your proposed threat you would experience such a shitstorm of consequences, my friend, your empty little head would be spinning faster than the wheels of your Schwinn bicycle back there.

Chad Feldheimer: Y-you think that's a Schwinn?

False Flag? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47746641)

False Flag?

Re:False Flag? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47746945)

Yes, it's all an elaborate conspiracy by Zoe Quinn to attack 4Chan. Mission accomplished.

Anonymous is not amused. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47746647)

It is starting to look more and more like this is FamedGod's doing, and these lizardtards are just trying to highjack the lulz.
https://www.facebook.com/Lizar... [facebook.com]

Re:Anonymous is not amused. (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47747005)

You are correct. http://www.gamerheadlines.com/... [gamerheadlines.com]

Twit....ter (5, Insightful)

Himmy32 (650060) | about 4 months ago | (#47746659)

Looking at Lizard Squad's twitter feed they have the maturity level of about a screaming toddler. The obvious lack of thinking is painful. They see these things as just pranks and a way to make a political statement. But bomb threats and DDoS attacks are a good way to waste your prime years in prison.

Re:Twit....ter (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47746949)

Why would they give security services such a wealth of information?

I would be very surprised if they hadn't inadvertently given away some information which could be used to identify them.

Re:Twit....ter (1)

Ryanrule (1657199) | about 4 months ago | (#47747353)

stupid is as stupid does.

Those Crazy Russians (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47746675)

Always up to no good.

Poor John Smedley (5, Funny)

Rosco P. Coltrane (209368) | about 4 months ago | (#47746683)

I don't know what's worse: being blown out of the sky with explosives or having to stay in Phoenix.

Re:Poor John Smedley (4, Funny)

SJHillman (1966756) | about 4 months ago | (#47746753)

Having to stay in Phoenix *with a Sony exec*. It's like cramming two levels of Hell together into one Boss Level of Hell.

Re:Poor John Smedley (5, Funny)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about 4 months ago | (#47747261)

And that Boss Level of Hell won't even load because the PSN is down.

Re:Poor John Smedley (1)

spire3661 (1038968) | about 4 months ago | (#47748427)

TO be fair, WESTERN Sony execs arent nearly as bad as the old Japanese guard. IM glad Kaz Hirai (Western) is in charge of SCEI now.

Re:Poor John Smedley (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47746861)

I don't know what's worse: being blown out of the sky with explosives or having to stay in Phoenix.

As someone who has lived in the Phoenix/Metro area all my life, I know the answer to that question...

I mean, it IS August, after all.

What? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47746789)

Is that first line even English? Either it's missing an apostrophe in "games" or it needs rewording.

Re:What? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47747059)

Yup - perfectly valid English, although not a typically-used syntax where I'm from (or where you're from, apparently).

Re:What? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47748757)

not a typically-used syntax where I'm from

An English speaking country?

They got what they wanted (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47746903)

These lizardsquad chuckle heads have been DDoSing all the major game networks for the past 3 weeks. They even claimed to have DDoS fbi.gov and nsa.gov over that same time. Now they finally have the fame they were looking for all along. CNN, Forbes and the front page of /.

Re:They got what they wanted (2)

Unknown74 (3041957) | about 4 months ago | (#47746967)

Ah, but it ain't over yet! Let's just see what else they get...

Re:They got what they wanted (1)

The Grim Reefer (1162755) | about 4 months ago | (#47747869)

Ah, but it ain't over yet! Let's just see what else they get..

An all expenses paid, one way trip to Cuba would be my guess.

What's the point of a hack like this? (4, Funny)

Joe Gillian (3683399) | about 4 months ago | (#47746939)

I just don't get why someone would be willing to commit criminal activity like they did just to annoy some people. It's not exactly a show of skill - PSN has been a low-hanging fruit for DDoS attacks since forever - and it's clearly not making them any money. I'm sure there's also ways they could've annoyed people more without having DHS coming after them for calling in a bomb threat. If I had a DDoS-capable botnet I'd at least do something fun with it, like spam mobile email addresses with fake CNN updates purporting that Christ has risen and he's declared the Year of the Linux Desktop.

Re:What's the point of a hack like this? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47746995)

Never wanted to steal from people, or sell them mexican viagra, so had no use for a botnet.... Until now!!

Re:What's the point of a hack like this? (4, Insightful)

xmousex (661995) | about 4 months ago | (#47747009)

I guess anyone clever enough to do something intelligent or useful with these attacks would also be smart enough not to bother.

Re:What's the point of a hack like this? (1)

Andy Dodd (701) | about 4 months ago | (#47747335)

It's a good question. I can see why PSN was originally targeted - some of Sony's behavior around then was atrocious.

But these guys are targeting everyone.

Re:What's the point of a hack like this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47747465)

It's a good question. I can see why PSN was originally targeted - some of Sony's behavior around then was atrocious.

Since you seem to be well informed, can you enlighten us of the atrocious behaviour of Sony around the time of the last hack?

Re:What's the point of a hack like this? (2)

spire3661 (1038968) | about 4 months ago | (#47748445)

Other OS removal, persecution of GeoHot, attempted trampling of the 1st Amendment (regarding Geohot)

Re:What's the point of a hack like this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47747397)

The Lizard Squad's agenda seems to be in support of ISIS.

They left a tweet saying something like

"Kuffar don't get to play video games until the bombing of ISIL stops"

Which, in my opinion, is a pretty bad plan. I mean, stopping kids from playing video games won't get the army to do anything. It also seems like the lizard squad could be just a troll collective that thinks they are being funny or ironic.

I have never felt less threatened by a group of hackers.

Misleading headline (0)

bluefoxlucid (723572) | about 4 months ago | (#47746985)

They said they've been receiving reports about a bomb on the plane, not that they put one there. They didn't make a bomb threat; they relayed one.

Re:Misleading headline (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47747065)

yeah, the same way the maffia would tell you: "it's a nice little shop you have there, I heard something bad could happen to it, like a fire, or a bomb. Want me to check on you once in a while ? you know just to be sure you're safe and all ?"

it's not like they would ever threaten anyone. Just relaying some hearsay and proposing some help.

Re:Misleading headline (4, Insightful)

gnasher719 (869701) | about 4 months ago | (#47747183)

They said they've been receiving reports about a bomb on the plane, not that they put one there. They didn't make a bomb threat; they relayed one.

They better have proof that they received a bomb threat then.

Re:Misleading headline (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47747739)

Mildly amusing that a few spoken words ( without the first shred of evidence mind you ) can cause so much havoc and panic that everything comes to a stop.

Seriously ? Some lame-ass hacker wanna be group is taken seriously for a terroristic threat when their most dastardly deed up to this point is denying access to a gaming network or two ? Has all common sense been bred out of the fucking country ?

If your five year old goes to school and tells the teacher of a bomb threat against some government official are we going to call out the SWAT teams, scramble the jets, go to Defcon II and run in little circles ? ( Wait . . . . this is the New America . . . . :| )

Before going into a general panic, you might consider the source of the information to . . I don't know . . . MAYBE put some thought into its credibility before going into "omgtehterrorists" panic mode ?

Re:Misleading headline (1)

Zalbik (308903) | about 4 months ago | (#47748613)

can cause so much havoc and panic that everything comes to a stop.

A plane landed in Phoenix instead of San Diego.

It doesn't appear that this involved "so much havoc or panic", or that "everything" depended on John Smedley reaching San Diego on time.

If it did, my Emergency Broadcast System must be broken. They should test that thing some time!

Re:Misleading headline (1)

ADRA (37398) | about 4 months ago | (#47749535)

Yes officer, I just yelled fire because 'someone else' did. I didn't start a panic for nefarious purposes or anything. There's only ONE place to report the threat of a bomb, and that's to authorities, not to a general public who can often knee jerk a response to a potentially real emergency without any form of organized response.

Re:Misleading headline (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47747555)

Actually, it's reasonably accurate, at least in the space of slashdot headlines. I think it's safe to assume they didn't actually receive a bomb threat and just pass it along to be nice guys. If you invented a fictitious bomb threat, guess what -- you just made a bomb threat. (And that holds legally, too. From a post below, USC Title 18: "willfully makes any threat, or maliciously conveys false information knowing the same to be false".)

US Code, Title 18, Part I, Chp 40 844 -Penalties (5, Informative)

luis_a_espinal (1810296) | about 4 months ago | (#47747049)

But things took a turn from irritating DDoS attacks to another level of harassment earlier this afternoon when the group took to Twitter to announce publicly that it a believed the flight carrying Sony Online Entertainment President John Smedley had explosives on board.

From US Code, Title 18, Part I, Chapter 40 844 - Penalties

(e) Whoever, through the use of the mail, telephone, telegraph, or other instrument of interstate or foreign commerce, or in or affecting interstate or foreign commerce, willfully makes any threat, or maliciously conveys false information knowing the same to be false, concerning an attempt or alleged attempt being made, or to be made, to kill, injure, or intimidate any individual or unlawfully to damage or destroy any building, vehicle, or other real or personal property by means of fire or an explosive shall be imprisoned for not more than 10 years or fined under this title, or both.

This is not including whatever state laws that were violated on top of Federal laws. One (well deserving) word: Darwin.

Re:US Code, Title 18, Part I, Chp 40 844 -Penaltie (1, Interesting)

Casualposter (572489) | about 4 months ago | (#47747731)

And the little fuckers talk about their exploits like some drunken dip-shit at a bar. They've lost sympathy from one group of people that might have some for them and they've called in a federal felony level bomb threat. Someone, perhaps their own bragging, is going to rat them out for this and a few years from now, they will be drug out of their mom's basement to the glaring light of CNN while mum tearfully cries on national TV about her over weight pasty skinned stereotype and the loss of every microprocessor device in the house.

Then the feds will hit the formerly bragging stereo type with every thing they can think up to up the charges to several hundred years in jail and the little stereotype will whine on face book and kickstarter about how the government is out to get him. Well, buddy, WE are the GOVERNMENT and WE are hoping you took metal shop in high school so that you can spend a few decades making license plates in a penitentiary. DDOSing a game is bad. Scaring hundreds of innocent people on a plane with bomb threat is way worse.

Didn't just attract attention from the authorities (2)

RedK (112790) | about 4 months ago | (#47747201)

They also pissed off "the better man". https://twitter.com/FamedGod/s... [twitter.com]

I dare ya. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47747705)

I challenge squad to go after bigger fish, say, something like wargaming.net. Be careful though, piss off ruskies enough and they will show up at squads' doorsteps. The digital world is easy but the physical world can be a bitch. Let us know how it works out.

The real hack (4, Interesting)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about 4 months ago | (#47747969)

Everyone seems to think this was no big deal... it was just a DDOS and the use of a phone! etc...

My question is: How did they know what flight Smeadly was on? That right there is the scary bit...

Re:The real hack (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47748277)

> My question is: How did they know what flight Smeadly was on? That right there is the scary bit...

My guess: Sony has a corporate jet just for him. Whenever it goes somewhere, he's on it. All flights are public knowledge. There are even websites dedicated to tracking them in real time.

Re:The real hack (1)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about 4 months ago | (#47748401)

> My question is: How did they know what flight Smeadly was on? That right there is the scary bit...

My guess: Sony has a corporate jet just for him. Whenever it goes somewhere, he's on it. All flights are public knowledge. There are even websites dedicated to tracking them in real time.

Nope, he was on an American Airlines flight.
Also, I'm now reading that this is not just a DDOS attack. They actually got on the servers and covered them with ISIS flags.

Re:The real hack (2)

Coditor (2849497) | about 4 months ago | (#47748399)

If you read the article the information about the exec and where and when he was traveling was public, they just looked up the most likely flight he would be on and used that.

Re:The real hack (1)

spire3661 (1038968) | about 4 months ago | (#47748459)

You are on Slashdot and you wonder how simple data like that was obtained? There are about a hundred ways to track a person now. Hell most people carry a tracking device on them.

Re:The real hack (4, Interesting)

Skuld-Chan (302449) | about 4 months ago | (#47749545)

Its pretty easy - Smeadly said he was going offline on a flight that had no wifi on twitter and that he was heading back to San Diego - he also said this on twitter. So all you have to do is figure out what convention Smeadly was at yesterday - so you know the originating city - and I'm guessing maybe there were a couple flights a day from there to SD.

Its a guess, but its a pretty educated one.

This is like first level private eye stuff here - people really assume everything they do is private, and then they give people clues publicly where they are without a second thought - and then it looks all hackerish like these guys have l33t skills.

Re:The real hack (1)

Skuld-Chan (302449) | about 4 months ago | (#47749571)

I should add - people give away all kinds of important information on where they are on twitter at any given time. I mean just watch this video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?... [youtube.com]

As an Internet Lizard, I just want to say ... (1)

geckoFeet (139137) | about 4 months ago | (#47748601)

... that these are not real internet lizards, just posseurs. I suspect that GEICO jerk. He's a sell-out.

A Sony RootKit on board (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47748611)

Put Sony Exec on the no fly list.

Stupid (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47748965)

Everytime some plinter group gives themselves a unique name, they draw attention to themselves and make it that much easier to be pinpointed...DUH!

why divert? (1)

orgelspieler (865795) | about 4 months ago | (#47749449)

So wait... it's OK if it blows up in Phoenix, but not in San Diego? Not sure I understand the logic of rerouting the flight.
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